Something more real in France

Posted:
in AppleOutsider edited January 2014
I came across this link to these great pictures on one of the food blogs I visit. I really think it is refreshing to see real food grown the way nature provides for. Monsanto can stay away from this food. It just takes me away to another world. I live in a world where people eat tons of processed foods out of a box or out of a freezer. To see fresh healthy food compared to the processed crap so many Americans eat is really cool and vintage to me.



Humble



Real



Authentic



http://www.flickr.com/photos/clotild...th/1059067837/



What do you think?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,191member
    Eating 'real' is a choice in America too. If you care to visit your local Whole Foods, Sprouts or many other so-called natural/organic foods markets you can largely avoid the processed foods wormhole.
  • Reply 2 of 27
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    Yesterday I made Rigatoni with Squash and Chicken!



    The sauce was made of acorn squash that I sauteed in olive oil, garlic, and low sodium chicken broth. Then I pureed the mixture and added some milk to make the whole thing saucier. Sauteed some chicken breasts, boiled some pasta, mixed the whole thing together and presto.



    Verdict? Too plain tasting and not worth the prep time. Peeling squash is a bitch.



    Giada made it look so much more appealing.
  • Reply 3 of 27
    dmzdmz Posts: 5,775member
    I just had a fish salad sandwich, on whole wheat bread made in my bread machine, and with fish that I caught/killed myself. There is a real world of eating/stewardship out there fellowship, you just may have to move away from Yee-Haw land to find it. (Although SpamSandwich has a point -- there are plenty of orgasmic choices out there.) Not to mention that you guys in the South can pretty much have year-round gardens if you wanted to.



    Two words fellowship:



    Wendell. Berry.





    edit: Also, pickup or Netflix Jaques Pepin's Fast Food My Way series -- outstanding stuff.
  • Reply 4 of 27
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    I dunno, Austin isn't exactly "Yee Haw" land.



    It's a big, progressive place these days.
  • Reply 5 of 27
    dmzdmz Posts: 5,775member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post


    I dunno, Austin isn't exactly "Yee Haw" land.



    It's a big, progressive place these days.



    Yes but that's...



    **cue derogatory tone**



    Austin







    I hear they even breast feed their babies down there, not something they let slide up DFW way.
  • Reply 6 of 27
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post


    Giada made it look so much more appealing.



    Giada is appealing. Except for the man hands.
  • Reply 7 of 27
    fellowshipfellowship Posts: 5,038member
    Yee Haw is hardly where I live. Granted I do not live in Napa Valley. I do have some wonderful Grocery choices here such as Whole Foods, Sprouts, and Central Market ( http://www.centralmarket.com/cm/cmAbout.jsp ) which is an upscale place with fresh fish and vast produce / wine etc. I even have access to wonderful non chain bakeries with bread that is just like that of Paris France. http://www.themainbakery.com/



    I just love the attention to hand crafted slow and real quality fresh food as the French are known for.



    Fellows
  • Reply 8 of 27
    mydomydo Posts: 1,888member
    That's kinda how I eat. We don't grow our own but we but from the farmers' market. Get a organic farm share. Eat some home grown. It reminds me of going to grandmas for the summer. Most of what we ate was home grown.



    People do live that way in this country.
  • Reply 9 of 27
    ptrashptrash Posts: 296member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Eating 'real' is a choice in America too. If you care to visit your local Whole Foods, Sprouts or many other so-called natural/organic foods markets you can largely avoid the processed foods wormhole.



    First of all, we don't call it whole paycheck for nothing. It's not really a choice if you can't afford it. In fact, that's the really sad thing; with-in 2 generations supermarket food and the stuff you'd buy at the farmers market have switched roles, the former now the budget item while the latter is the luxury item.



    Second, in NYC we have a greenmarket (farmer's market) operating up the street from the Union Square whole foods. After shopping at the farmer's market whole food's produce doesn't look so tasty. Today natural and organic is just a marketing term, denoting gropwing practices around pesticides and fertilizers. (Twenty years ago there was a relationship with taste and freshness in some foodstores, but even then it was tentative--I'm thinking SF Realfoods in the mid to late 80s)



    But wait, even some of that produce at the farmer's market looks a whole lot more manafactured than it did back in the 60s. I remember the time when tomatoes came in funny shapes--now they call those "heirlooms", and the red ones are square. The corn has changed also, as they attempt to create strains that have enough sugar to retain sweetenss for a few days, or even a week. Peaches are less seeet, probably to improve shelf life. Now the strawberries--I wouldn't buy them in any commerical grocery, although I imagine some food lovers stores still exist in various pockets of the country



    PS When I was in Europe last Spring I heard the refrain over and over (in Poland no less, not a country known for it's great food): American food is horrible, especially the fruits and vegetables. Our food has been doctored for so long, we no longer have the standard bearers to compare it with.
  • Reply 10 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ptrash View Post


    PS When I was in Europe last Spring I heard the refrain over and over (in Poland no less, not a country known for it's great food): American food is horrible, especially the fruits and vegetables. Our food has been doctored for so long, we no longer have the standard bearers to compare it with.



    On the other hand, when people from the Asian side of the planet come to the US, they are astounded by the quality and amount of food available. I tend to agree with them.
  • Reply 11 of 27
    True. Our dogs are much tastier over here...
  • Reply 12 of 27
    Many American prefer natural locally grown foods. Go to a small town in the American Midwest and look at the fresh produce, chicken, beef, pork eggs and milk. Such food continues to become more common in our cities. We have a beautiful farmers market a few blocks from my trailer here in Houston. You don’t have to eat processed rubbish in the US and you don’t have to be rich not to. Stop whining and go to the farmers market.
  • Reply 13 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by southside grabowski View Post


    Many American prefer natural locally grown foods. Go to a small town in the American Midwest and look at the fresh produce, chicken, beef, pork eggs and milk. Such food continues to become more common in our cities. We have a beautiful farmers market a few blocks from my trailer here in Houston. You don?t have to eat processed rubbish in the US and you don?t have to be rich not to. Stop whining and go to the farmers market.



    I'm lucky because here in Sacramento, California we are literally in the heart of the Central Valley and only 3-4 hours' drive from the Salinas Valley near Monterey, some of the world's most productive and diverse farmland, no contest. As such, the local farmer's markets have a HUGE variety of locally-grown foods that really boggle the mind. We get superb strawberries and asparagus in the spring, lots of different vegetables in the summer, and lots of great vegetables from the Imperial Valley in the winter. And you wonder why some of the most cutting-edge restaurants in the USA are all in California.
  • Reply 14 of 27
    Oh how this thread brings back memories of eating strawberries straight from the plant in my dads vegetable garden



    Also french markets. Man I love french markets. Yummie!
  • Reply 15 of 27
    fellowshipfellowship Posts: 5,038member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SactoMan01 View Post


    I'm lucky because here in Sacramento, California we are literally in the heart of the Central Valley and only 3-4 hours' drive from the Salinas Valley near Monterey, some of the world's most productive and diverse farmland, no contest. As such, the local farmer's markets have a HUGE variety of locally-grown foods that really boggle the mind. We get superb strawberries and asparagus in the spring, lots of different vegetables in the summer, and lots of great vegetables from the Imperial Valley in the winter. And you wonder why some of the most cutting-edge restaurants in the USA are all in California.



    In a way California must be similar to France as far as local crops and wine etc. are cared for cultivated and marketed. I wish more of the country could grow the diversity of foods you find in CA and Fr.



    Fellows
  • Reply 16 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fellowship View Post


    In a way California must be similar to France as far as local crops and wine etc. are cared for cultivated and marketed. I wish more of the country could grow the diversity of foods you find in CA and Fr.



    Fellows



    Ah Fellows....The Metroplex is not representative of most of the US. This is a very diverse country. Perhaps you have lived in Texas all of your life. There are a lot of very nice commmuities in this land.
  • Reply 17 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SactoMan01 View Post


    I'm lucky because here in Sacramento, California we are literally in the heart of the Central Valley and only 3-4 hours' drive from the Salinas Valley near Monterey, some of the world's most productive and diverse farmland, no contest. As such, the local farmer's markets have a HUGE variety of locally-grown foods that really boggle the mind. We get superb strawberries and asparagus in the spring, lots of different vegetables in the summer, and lots of great vegetables from the Imperial Valley in the winter. And you wonder why some of the most cutting-edge restaurants in the USA are all in California.



    I wouldn't say "HUGE", but the little farmer's markets here have a fair amount of good seasonal crops. My only complaint is that the markets are too small and spreadout throughout the downtown parks. Too many times I have to remember to get a specific fruit or vegetable on a Wednesday because the Tuesday market doesn't carry it. I think that's the problem with most farmer's markets. They're just not big enough to meet the needs of most customers. It's nice to pick up a bag of peaches here and there, but I can't do all my fruit and vegetable shopping in one day with them. I don't have the time nor the patience to spreadout my grocery shopping throughout a whole week. That's probably why I end up going to the supermarket instead...
  • Reply 18 of 27
    fellowshipfellowship Posts: 5,038member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by southside grabowski View Post


    Ah Fellows....The Metroplex is not representative of most of the US. This is a very diverse country. Perhaps you have lived in Texas all of your life. There are a lot of very nice commmuities in this land.



    When ya goin ta have me over to tha trailor ?







    Fellows
  • Reply 19 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fellowship View Post


    When ya goin ta have me over to tha trailor ?







    Fellows



    You get a few points for catching that Fellows



    I think the proper language is: "When ya fixin ta "
  • Reply 20 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post


    I wouldn't say "HUGE", but the little farmer's markets here have a fair amount of good seasonal crops. My only complaint is that the markets are too small and spreadout throughout the downtown parks. Too many times I have to remember to get a specific fruit or vegetable on a Wednesday because the Tuesday market doesn't carry it.



    Try going to the one every Sunday morning beneath the W-X Freeway--that one has a pretty good variety of vegetables for sale almost every week.
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