Adobe says CS3 not fully tested with Apple's Leopard

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Adobe said Tuesday that its flagship Photoshop, Illustrator and other Creative Suite 3 programs have not been fully tested with the next version of Apple's operating system due out next month, which could lead to incompatibility issues.



A substantial proportion of Adobe users are also Apple Mac users, notes Reuters, with many eagerly awaiting the new Mac OS X operating system, code-named "Leopard."



Speaking to the media outlet, Adobe chief executive Bruce Chizen said his firm has not received a final copy of Leopard with which to test its software titles, including the recently released Creative Suite 3.0.



"CS3 hasn't fully been tested under Leopard," he said. "If it doesn't work, we will make the necessary adjustments."



Chizen's comments on Leopard compatibility appear to have been extracted from a more general interview with Reuters covering the firm's recently released financial report.



The San Jose, Calif.-based software developer said Monday that third-quarter profit more than doubled to $205.2 million, or 34 cents a share, from $94.4 million, or 16 cents a share, in the same quarter last year.



Apple has said it plans to unleash Leopard sometime in October.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    I definitely have to wait for an upgrade now. What a pain!
  • Reply 2 of 28
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    What a non-story



    How COULD Adobe have received a final copy of Leopard if, Leopard isn't final yet?



    How COULD CS3 be "fully" tested right now?



    How COULD Adobe be certain right now that there will be no issues?



    All they could ever say is exactly what they said: if anything needs to be fixed, they will fix it. What answer could be better than that?



    There's no bad news here. Bad news may come later.
  • Reply 3 of 28
    Adobe and Apple is starting to resemble Paris and Nicole.
  • Reply 4 of 28
    So basically this non-story is...



    Apple won't let Adobe have a copy of the finished Leopard when it's not finished yet but will fix whatever problems crop up anyway.
  • Reply 5 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    What a non-story



    How COULD Adobe be certain right now that there will be no issues?



    There's no bad news here. Bad news may come later.



    Actually, it's not a non-story. If you forget the simple fact that Adobe gets free publicity, if you read between the lines, Adobe has just announced that CS3 is definitely broken on Leopard and they're trying to head any complaints from their users by preassigning the blame to Apple.
  • Reply 6 of 28
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jbravo556 View Post


    Actually, it's not a non-story. If you forget the simple fact that Adobe gets free publicity, if you read between the lines, Adobe has just announced that CS3 is definitely broken on Leopard and they're trying to head any complaints from their users by preassigning the blame to Apple.



    People do like looking for patterns



    Where does Adobe suggest that Apple should be blamed for anything?



    And what different phrasing would you expect if the truth were "we don't know yet" instead of "definitely broken"? There must be something in the statement that makes that distinction, but I can't spot it.
  • Reply 7 of 28
    Non story all right.



    But speaking of leopard, are there any apps known to have 64 bit versions already, or have 64 bit updates announced for when Leopard ships?



    There have been many apps released not that long ago...are any known to be leopard ready (or mostly so, since it's not a final release) in advance?
  • Reply 8 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    People do like looking for patterns



    Where does Adobe suggest that Apple should be blamed for anything?



    And what different phrasing would you expect if the truth were "we don't know yet" instead of "definitely broken"? There must be something in the statement that makes that distinction, but I can't spot it.



    Sorry, my mistake. If you read the original article from Reuters:



    http://www.reuters.com/article/techn...36532720070918



    It's the NPD "Analyst" who tries to blame Apple.



    I've never read anything like this article that I could take at face value. If as far as Adobe is concerned everything is working and they haven't yet found the stuff that doesn't work, then they wouldn't come out and say things like that.



    As far as I'm concerned, the simple fact that it was them who started to say that it may not work, and so far ahead of time, it means that they're sure that it won't work (properly) and they won't start fixing it until the final release comes out from Apple. I don't expect Adobe or any developer to guarantee their apps working before testing on the final release, but unless something is definitely wrong, I don't expect them to pre-announce that their apps may not work.



    Has any other developer made such a statement other than Adobe? what about Quark, Omni, Devon? There are hundreds if not thousands of Mac software developers, and none of them are saying anything; which is the way to go about it.
  • Reply 9 of 28
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    I find it strange that no Leopard beta testers have chimed in on this story. Are they all just xcode junkies or are there some designers on the Leopard seed list? CS3 is the top software package for Macintosh so where are the testers?



    m
  • Reply 10 of 28
    kolchakkolchak Posts: 1,398member
    Eh. No skin off my nose. I didn't plan on buying Leopard next month anyway. It's always a bad idea to jump on a major OS revision, even if it's from Apple. I always wait for the .1 release. I figure 10.5.1 should be out around Christmas or so and should take care of most of the major problems the early adopters encounter.
  • Reply 11 of 28
    Adobe... same as Digidesign/Avid, are huge. They make it out like they have no advanced knowledge of Leopard. I made it to WWDC the past two years and have received new seeds as they come out... you can't tell me Adobe doesn't get these. I am not saying it doesn't take work to make everything work right... but I just don't like the assumption that we have to wait for an OS to be out for 3 months before Adobe gets on board... get on board now!



    -Roy
  • Reply 12 of 28
    messiahmessiah Posts: 1,689member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "CS3 hasn't fully been tested under Leopard," he said. "If it doesn't work, we will make the necessary adjustments."



    Yeah, the 'adjusted' release will be called CS4.
  • Reply 13 of 28
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    This isn't any different than any other release Apple has made.
  • Reply 14 of 28
    ajmasajmas Posts: 543member
    As already mentioned, since Leopard is not final it is hard to know what will and what won't break.



    What Adobe is saying is basically what any company at this point in time is likely to say. This also reminds companies that they should wait a bit before upgrading to Leopard, just in case there are incompatibilities. I say remind, since companies should already wait a few months before upgrading, unless it is crucial since things can go wrong and it is better to let someone else find out, than your bottom line.
  • Reply 15 of 28
    Has there been issues with CS3 on the Leopard betas released so far? If so, can't Adobe at least get a head start on software updates for the CS3 package? And if not, then what reason is there to sound the alarm?
  • Reply 16 of 28
    How very unsurprising. I don't think any responsible professional houses working with CS software are going to jump on Leopard the second it comes out. Look what happens in the Windows world. Many are still running W2K precisely because it takes them FOREVER to certify new OS or updates. Who would want to have critical production software running on totally new OS? Heck, even I for my private needs (music/film editing) will wait a good long while before upgrading to Leopard... if I do so at all. I don't find Leopard that compelling from what I can see so far. I may very well skip Leopard and get whatever comes after (10.6) with new hardware. So far, my apps work perfectly well with Tiger. Why should I jump into Leopard the second they release it?
  • Reply 17 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FineWine View Post


    Why should I jump into Leopard the second they release it?



    Because hopefully finder won't suck as much.
  • Reply 18 of 28
    eckingecking Posts: 1,588member
    This isn't anything spectacular, anyone who heavily relies on a certain piece of software should never upgrade their OS once a new one drops. You always wait for them to iron out any potential problems. Especially if you make money with the software.
  • Reply 19 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ecking View Post


    This isn't anything spectacular, anyone who heavily relies on a certain piece of software should never upgrade their OS once a new one drops. You always wait for them to iron out any potential problems. Especially if you make money with the software.



    Isn't the point of Apple supplying developers with builds prior to final release so that they can have fixes ready by launch time?
  • Reply 20 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post


    Has there been issues with CS3 on the Leopard betas released so far? If so, can't Adobe at least get a head start on software updates for the CS3 package? And if not, then what reason is there to sound the alarm?



    Quote:

    I find it strange that no Leopard beta testers have chimed in on this story. Are they all just xcode junkies or are there some designers on the Leopard seed list? CS3 is the top software package for Macintosh so where are the testers?



    Yes, it won't install on the latest. That is all I'm saying.
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