Why are people so angry about the update?

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
I sincerely do not understand the outcry, even from those with bricked phones. They knew that it was dangerous and that, at the very least it would void their warranty. Many even sung the praises and used an app called iBricker. What did you expect?



As for those who only downloaded a hack of a software installer, what were you thinking? You know Apple has not put out an SDK. So you are voiding your warranty and perhaps the use of your phone to a command line geek who could care less about what it does to your phone.



On top of all that, Apple warned you about modifying your phone. They saw that their update would cause problems for some of the unauthorized hacks and told you that the update was coming and that it would likely break your hacked iPhone. Apple was not trying to brick any iPhones. The last thing they want is a mob of angry people showing potential buyers how fragile the iPhone is. Instead of taking heed, people said things like "Oh, Apple wouldn't dare release an update that would do injury to a modified phone."



Now, I'm not suggesting you did anything illegal, just stupid. If you mess with your firmware in your computer so that it will not turn on, or open an iMac case because you want a better graphics card, or you just want to overclock your system, no problem. But when your computer does not work any more, or a software update breaks your modified system, you have only yourself to blame. The reason you have to back up your data before sending it in to Apple Care is because they will likely restore the system to factory settings. If it works the way it should, then it is your problem, not theirs. Send a warranty voided, obviously modified system to Apple and they won't even look at it. This is true with all products. Why should Apple be any different?



Bottom line. You bought the phone and it worked beautifully. But you wanted it to do even more. You wanted to turn it into something it was not. From the first moment you put home baked software on you phone, you voided your warranty. Apple tried to warn you but you didn't listen. I understand why you are sad about the ill health of your phone. What I don't understand is why you are angry at Apple.



I am not flame bating. I genuinely want to know why you think that your bricked phone is Apple's fault.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 98
    imacfpimacfp Posts: 750member
    I think people were so taken with the iPhone and seem to love them so much they just wanted to make them even better by adding software that Apple did not provide. The other thing too is that many power users are used to changing their phone and/or computers and figured they could do the same thing with the iPhone. Now the people who unlocked the phones are in a somewhat different group, since they know that the iPhone is supposed to only be used with At&T. I don't feel as bad for that later group but I do feel bad for the people who just added software. Apple should have taken a different tack with this whole situation.
  • Reply 2 of 98
    physguyphysguy Posts: 912member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by imacFP View Post


    I think people were so taken with the iPhone and seem to love them so much they just wanted to make them even better by adding software that Apple did not provide. The other thing too is that many power users are used to changing their phone and/or computers and figured they could do the same thing with the iPhone. Now the people who unlocked the phones are in a somewhat different group, since they know that the iPhone is supposed to only be used with At&T. I don't feel as bad for that later group but I do feel bad for the people who just added software. Apple should have taken a different tack with this whole situation.



    For the former group, that just added software, they can downgrade and be where they were. That's IMO the best course for now. Keep what you already liked and see where this all shakes out. If you added software (without the SIM unlock) then you likely have the skills to downgrade - its not really very hard.
  • Reply 3 of 98
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by physguy View Post


    For the former group, that just added software, they can downgrade and be where they were. That's IMO the best course for now. Keep what you already liked and see where this all shakes out. If you added software (without the SIM unlock) then you likely have the skills to downgrade - its not really very hard.



    I am part of the group of people that only added software and not "unlocked" the phone,

    I am also part of a group that is scared to try any more "hacks" for fear of what apple has done in this last "down grade" that if I try to revert to 1.0.2 it might brick the phone and that is not an risk I am going to take.



    Also I has a lot of custom ringtones that I made from old system sounds back in days of OS 7.

    and now I can't use them.



    I just think that apple has too tight of a grip on the OS of the phone and needs to lighten up.
  • Reply 4 of 98
    ebbyebby Posts: 3,110member
    Much of the outcry stems from sudden changes in Apple policies and the now dangerously uncertain corporate/consumer relationship. Apple is alienating much of their fan base by intentionally blocking advancements. (How about a world without podcasts, anyone?) They are expanding their power from owning all things Apple, to controlling all things Apple and users don't want to give up that power. Looking back, the signs are obvious (e.g. "Made for iPod" marketing ploy). Unfortunately, our power over the products we buy is dwindling away one by one. I personally do not like the road we are headed down and see no resolution to this problem without humiliation and serious backlash against Apple. I like this company and am a Apple fan, but they are making wrong choices hand over fist since working with AT&T. The only certainty from this alliance is that it will either hurt Apple or its costomers.
  • Reply 5 of 98
    physguyphysguy Posts: 912member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KG4MXV View Post


    I am part of the group of people that only added software and not "unlocked" the phone,

    I am also part of a group that is scared to try any more "hacks" for fear of what apple has done in this last "down grade" that if I try to revert to 1.0.2 it might brick the phone and that is not an risk I am going to take.



    Also I has a lot of custom ringtones that I made from old system sounds back in days of OS 7.

    and now I can't use them.



    I just think that apple has too tight of a grip on the OS of the phone and needs to lighten up.



    While I'm not going to take the responsibility of recommending to you to downgrade, as that's your choice, I will say that, after doing it, the tools that Apple provides for recovering the phone (again, as long as you haven't touched the firmware by unlocking the SIM) seem reasonably capable.



    I following the 'Slightly Easier' instructions here. I did 'seem' to brick the iphone the first time so I simply redid it again. The trick is to use the 'home-power' button followed by holding the 'home' button to put it in restore mode. I never used a stopwatch and didn't find the timing all that exacting (as they imply). This hardware reset seems to put the phone back in restore mode even if non-responsive (one time for me at least).



    I did use AppTap to jailbreak the phone so I can't comment if that is important. It's certainly easy to use in the downgrade process. I'm fully back to 1.0.2 with all the 3rd party apps I had before.



    Also looks like going to iTunes 7.3.2 makes it even easier.
  • Reply 6 of 98
    mac voyermac voyer Posts: 1,282member
    Can't get this post to come out right.



    I do not see the difference in jailbreaking your phone for adding app and or adding other carriers. There are probably good reasons that Apple has not released an SDK. Perhaps they didn't want to put out an SDK that would force them to support it and slow the progression of new features they would like to add.



    And everyone still seems to be forgetting that Apple gave fair waning. Their products have always been closed and there are always people trying to unlock them. The only thing Apple did differently in this case is that they gave plenty of warning before they pushed out the update.
  • Reply 7 of 98
    physguyphysguy Posts: 912member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post


    Can't get this post to come out right.



    I do not see the difference in jailbreaking your phone for adding app and or adding other carriers. There are probably good reasons that Apple has not released an SDK. Perhaps they didn't want to put out an SDK that would force them to support it and slow the progression of new features they would like to add.



    And everyone still seems to be forgetting that Apple gave fair waning. Their products have always been closed and there are always people trying to unlock them. The only thing Apple did differently in this case is that they gave plenty of warning before they pushed out the update.



    Well, for one when jailbreaking for apps your only breaking one license, the one with Apple, when modifiying the SIM your breaking two - one with apple for the jailbreaking and one with AT&T for the carrier access.



    On the more important practical level on the first your only modifying the 'OS X' software, not the firmware on the SIM. This is far easier to recover from.



    I've done the former, not the latter. By doing the former I fully understand that Apple is not responsible for fixing this.



    The amazing contradiction to me is in breaking the SIM. Except for a few areas in the country (and they are few by population) where there are small GSM operators, there is only T-Mobile to go to, from AT&T. Not much better and no cheaper. So, the only motivation for breaking the SIM is to sell it overseas (and yes I travel overseas quite a bit and the main thing I need from my phone is my phone number so SIM hacking makes no sense). So the contradiction is



    1) I have to break the SIM so I can have an iPhone NOW

    2) The iPhone has far too few features to interest users outside the poor, mobile backward US.



    hmmmmm.
  • Reply 8 of 98
    First Apple sets a higher expectation from the customer base by delivering on the hype. They *must* at least live up to it.



    Besides, they are a computer manufacturer with both hardware, OS, and software which means their expertise in computer devices are superb. Mac anyone ?. Of course!. Do why do they think the cellphone buying public is as dumb as the average consumer electronics buyer ?. Nope, these are the same customers who buys Macs and higher-end PCs. So there is an expectation of what the hardware can do. Besides, do you see much slowness or stumbling of the UI in the iPhones like in most Nokias and SE phone ?. Nope. Fluid as it can be on the iPhone, so processing power and system balance is great like on a Mac.



    And come on. From OS footprint of 95MB image vs 150Mb image from 1.0.2 to 1.1.1. More than 50% more code, just to deliver a handfull of features ???.

    Ask any developer. There is something sinister lurking in there for sure.

    And was the "bricking" deliberate ?. Hell Ya!



    I hope they fix this "weakness" by Xmas or else they can kiss goodbye to that 10M units they are aiming for.
  • Reply 9 of 98
    physguyphysguy Posts: 912member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nano2Gfteo View Post


    First Apple sets a higher expectation from the customer base by delivering on the hype. They *must* at least live up to it.



    Besides, they are a computer manufacturer with both hardware, OS, and software which means their expertise in computer devices are superb. Mac anyone ?. Of course!. Do why do they think the cellphone buying public is as dumb as the average consumer electronics buyer ?. Nope, these are the same customers who buys Macs and higher-end PCs. So there is an expectation of what the hardware can do. Besides, do you see much slowness or stumbling of the UI in the iPhones like in most Nokias and SE phone ?. Nope. Fluid as it can be on the iPhone, so processing power and system balance is great like on a Mac.



    And come on. From OS footprint of 95MB image vs 150Mb image from 1.0.2 to 1.1.1. More than 50% more code, just to deliver a handfull of features ???.

    Ask any developer. There is something sinister lurking in there for sure.

    And was the "bricking" deliberate ?. Hell Ya!



    I hope they fix this "weakness" by Xmas or else they can kiss goodbye to that 10M units they are aiming for.



    Sorry but a total load of BS. IF Apple wanted to intentionally brick the phone it wouldn't take 50+ MB of code. A deliberate brick would only be a few (100's maybe) lines of code. They've locked the phone tighter by simply changing the communications protocol with iTunes (putting more on the iPhone and less in iTunes) and making the decrypt key harder to find. Again hardly 50 MB of code.



    The code increase is likely due to adding things under the hood like TV out (which if it was actually missing from the original releases instead of just turned off would take a few MB). The iTMS store app also added a few MB. etc. Don't get all paranoid.
  • Reply 10 of 98
    The only people miffed by all of this are those who don't bother to adhere to a contract that they themselves signed, so as far as I'm concerned, brick 'em all and next time don't waste the time and energy and money warning the idiots. Apple can live with news reports about people stupid enough to break a contract and then make a fuss about it when things don't work out too well.



    These "people" are miffed about what has happened to them, but the majority are the ones who never did anything to their phones and who suffer because Apple has to waste resources dealing with selfish, immature and boisterous jerks rather than creating good products.



    Everybody loses.
  • Reply 11 of 98
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Quote:

    Why are people so angry about the update?



    Immaturity, pure and simple.
  • Reply 12 of 98
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    Or, they could just release an SDK and have wonderful little apps that delight us on our iphone.



    Like a .mac chat client which should have been there from the start. I have this now on an app tapped iPhone. It's called Apollo.



    Or, a wonderful little app called navizon which integrates cell towers and wifi nodes to tell you where you are without the use of gps. It handily integrates into google maps and makes the experience that much better.



    I can even play tetris now on the little bugger.



    I would gladly trade the existing itunes wifi store for the ability to use these apps as I can still get my itunes music from my laptop when I get home.



    I am not whining, I feel that there is so much potential in this product that to lock it down tightly will be detrimental to the user community and Apple in general.



    Think Different.
  • Reply 13 of 98
    As a hacked (for 3rd party apps, not SIM unlocking) iPhone owner, I?m bummed about the recent turn of events. (I haven?t ?upgraded? to 1.1.1 yet). As someone who has owned every smartphone ever made, the iPhone is still leaps and bounds better than the competition (with or without the hacks). So I?m still a happy iPhone owner.



    Still, though, I wish Apple would issue a statement explaining why the 3rd party apps are so bad. I completely understand why they don?t want people unlocking the SIM to other carriers and concur with their right (which they are probably contractually obligated to exercise) to block the SIM unlocking.



    Can you imagine how quickly Palm would have died if they allowed no add-on applications?



    If Apple were selling/licensing it's own applications, I could see them not wanting the free-bees out there. But they aren't.



    Why put the "full" OSX on the phone if you only allow web-based applications?



    Can you imagine how quickly the Treo would have died if they allowed no add-on applications?
  • Reply 14 of 98
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TednDi View Post


    I am not whining, I feel that there is so much potential in this product that to lock it down tightly will be detrimental to the user community and Apple in general.



    Locked down tightly? What the hell are you talking about? iPhone development isn't "locked" down whatsoever. Apple simply hasn't released a public SDK yet. The most likely reason is that the APIs are still in flux



    You claim not to be whining but then use loaded terms like "locked" that are a clear indication of your perception of the situation. You and many others obviously feel wronged, that apple has done something unfair. In my opinion, it is an immature or naive position to take.



    Going public with incomplete and rapidly evolving APIs would lead to unstable upgrades and a public relations nightmare. 3rd party apps (hacks) currently rely on the unpublished APIs and hence, break as expected when apple releases an update. The same won't be true when the APIs are finished and relatively static. Many, and perhaps even most, seasoned developers belive that a public SDK and public APIs will released at that point.
  • Reply 15 of 98
    mac voyermac voyer Posts: 1,282member
    I am not a programmer, but it is my understanding that no new product releases an SDK right away. The iPhone is not just another smartphone, it is a paradigm shift in how we think about phones. Give them a little time to figure out the best way to introduce 3rd party apps, or take your chances with iBricker. By the way, CPU and GPU overclockers do something similar. Many have burned out their expensive components. But I cannot recall an outcry against the manufacturer for risks they freely took. Here's an article I ran accross that some of you might find enlightening. I still haven't seen anyone address the fact that Apple gave fair warning. It leads me to the same conclusion of the writer of the article below. Enjoy.



    http://www.surfbits.com/?p=1313
  • Reply 16 of 98
    imacfpimacfp Posts: 750member
    The bigger problem is that Apple is being secretive, as they always are, but in this case it is working against them. If they'd just been up front and said the SDK is not ready yet, but will be out in a few months, they would be fine now. It's still possible a SDK will never come, but I think they'll be forced to do it regardless. Apple needs to start talking and explain exactly what they are planning. At&T supports development on all their phones except the iPhone and aren't able to give a good reason why Apple doesn't when asked.
  • Reply 17 of 98
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dfiler View Post


    Locked down tightly? What the hell are you talking about? iPhone development isn't "locked" down whatsoever. Apple simply hasn't released a public SDK yet. The most likely reason is that the APIs are still in flux



    You claim not to be whining but then use loaded terms like "locked" that are a clear indication of your perception of the situation. You and many others obviously feel wronged, that apple has done something unfair. In my opinion, it is an immature or naive position to take.



    Going public with incomplete and rapidly evolving APIs would lead to unstable upgrades and a public relations nightmare. 3rd party apps (hacks) currently rely on the unpublished APIs and hence, break as expected when apple releases an update. The same won't be true when the APIs are finished and relatively static. Many, and perhaps even most, seasoned developers belive that a public SDK and public APIs will released at that point.





    Don't tase me bro!



    The phone is locked. Locked= For use on ATT only and Locked= no 3rd party apps. Simple.



    You can call it what you want, but the phone is still locked out to anyone but apple.



    Your argument for not issuing a SDK is also somewhat flawed. Apple has a history of issuing unstable upgrades. That is why these boards are filled with upgrade yet or not threads. They could have released and updated the SDK and started an iphone app certification process. They did not. The latest upgrade thankfully did not hose my iphone. But, that was a risk I was willing to take as was the conscious step in purposefully voiding my warrantee.



    If I choose to wipe OS X off of my computer and run Linux or Win XP is that breaking my computer? If I modify the icons in OS X is that breaking my computer, If I install Doom on my mac is that breaking my computer? I say no. I bought the hardware and licensed the software. I am contractually bound to pay ATT for 2 years. The only gripe that I have is that the platform is much richer with a robust community of 3rd party apps and iPhone developers.



    If making that observation is whining then so be it.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkMkGOpAF4s





  • Reply 18 of 98
    gizmo-xlgizmo-xl Posts: 141member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TednDi View Post


    Don't tase me bro!



    The phone is locked. Locked= For use on ATT only and Locked= no 3rd party apps. Simple.



    You can call it what you want, but the phone is still locked out to anyone but apple.



    It is a Apple device so what's the problem?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TednDi View Post


    Your argument for not issuing a SDK is also somewhat flawed. Apple has a history of issuing unstable upgrades. That is why these boards are filled with upgrade yet or not threads. They could have released and updated the SDK and started an iphone app certification process. They did not. The latest upgrade thankfully did not hose my iphone. But, that was a risk I was willing to take as was the conscious step in purposefully voiding my warrantee.



    If I choose to wipe OS X off of my computer and run Linux or Win XP is that breaking my computer? If I modify the icons in OS X is that breaking my computer, If I install Doom on my mac is that breaking my computer? I say no. I bought the hardware and licensed the software. I am contractually bound to pay ATT for 2 years. The only gripe that I have is that the platform is much richer with a robust community of 3rd party apps and iPhone developers.



    If making that observation is whining then so be it.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkMkGOpAF4s









    When you purchased your Mac did you sign an agreement that said you can't do any of the above? NO!!!!!!!!!!!! But you did with the iPhone.... you are talking Apples and Orange's
  • Reply 19 of 98
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gizmo-xl View Post


    It is a Apple device so what's the problem?







    When you purchased your Mac did you sign an agreement that said you can't do any of the above? NO!!!!!!!!!!!! But you did with the iPhone.... you are talking Apples and Orange's



    Um, I thought I was talking Apples and IPhones.



    And, frankly after reading the Software License agreement I haven't done anything of the sort either.



    Did you read the Software License agreement?



    http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/iphone.pdf
  • Reply 20 of 98
    gizmo-xlgizmo-xl Posts: 141member
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