How to control another mac on a network

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I've tried searching for this, but I fear I don't know the correct terms to search on. I'm a networking novice, so am relatively clueless.



At work I have two Macs (one Leopard, one Tiger) that are both attached to the network via an Ethernet connection.



What I would like to be able to do is control one Mac with the other (including adding and deleting files). I'm pretty sure OSX natively includes this functionality -- I just don't know where to go for a tutorial.



Could someone kindly point me to a knowledgebase (or other) article that can guide me through this process?



Thanks!

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    Timbuktu Pro pioneered the technology on the Mac.



    PC Anywhere was late to the party.
  • Reply 2 of 19
    Apple remote access will do that but you need the server version
  • Reply 3 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Argelius View Post


    I've tried searching for this, but I fear I don't know the correct terms to search on. I'm a networking novice, so am relatively clueless.



    At work I have two Macs (one Leopard, one Tiger) that are both attached to the network via an Ethernet connection.



    What I would like to be able to do is control one Mac with the other (including adding and deleting files). I'm pretty sure OSX natively includes this functionality -- I just don't know where to go for a tutorial.



    Could someone kindly point me to a knowledgebase (or other) article that can guide me through this process?



    Thanks!



    iChat in 10.5 will let you do it.
  • Reply 4 of 19
    yep, Leopard does it via "screen sharing" ... built into the OS. Any earlier version will require Apple Remote Access (or a third party app that does the same thing.)



    I've gotten Screen Sharing to work on my home network, but have NOT been able to get it to work across the internet.
  • Reply 5 of 19
    With a Mac running Leopard you can in a few quite easy steps make this possible: you can control another Mac on a network (that is running Tiger or Leopard or...).

    If you need to do it on a Mac that isn't running Leopard (or if you need real administration capabilities) you'll need Apple Remote Desktop (any version will do) or for instance Timbuktu Pro (in which case you'll need at least what they call a twin pack).

    There are also some shareware options around, if my memroy serves me right; search for VNC, ARD or remote access or...



    The whole concept works like this: on the machine you wish to control you have to set up an user account to whom you'll give the right to control it. It can be any existing account as well. When you later on control the machine over the network it is in fact _this_ user account that is operating the computer, from the computers point of view, anyway.



    The steps in doing this from Leopard to Tiger are more or less these:



    1. Turn on "Apple Remote Desktop" in the Sharing tab of System Preferences. Click the "Access Privileges.." button and in the list "Allow user to do the following on this computer..." turn on all the rights you wish to give this user. After you have made your choices click OK.

    2. Under the "Access Privileges..." button you now see: "Others can manage your computer using the address x.x.x.x". Use this address to contact the computer if Bonjour doesn't detect it.

    3. On a Mac running Leopard you will now see the Tiger-Mac in the Shared section of the sidebar of any Finder window. Choose it and click Share Screen to log in using the account name and password of the user to whom you earlier gave the right to control the Tiger Mac.

    Like magic you will now see the screen of the other Mac in a window on your screen. And you can use it like sitting in front of it.



    This is in Leopard called "Instant screen sharing from the Finder". Click "Finder" in the list, if that's not what is displayed.



    -matts
  • Reply 6 of 19
    jabohnjabohn Posts: 556member
    "Apple Remote Desktop" is what you want (if you don't have Leopard).



    "Apple Remote Access" is a completely different relic of OS 9 and not even related to desktop screen sharing.



    There are also free alternatives using VNC - do a search for it at versiontracker.com where you'll find many different options.
  • Reply 7 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post


    yep, Leopard does it via "screen sharing" ... built into the OS. Any earlier version will require Apple Remote Access (or a third party app that does the same thing.)



    I've gotten Screen Sharing to work on my home network, but have NOT been able to get it to work across the internet.



    I have been able to do this over the internet without any problems
  • Reply 8 of 19
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    As Matt said.



    To summarize, if the Leopard Mac is the one you are sitting at, all you have to do is make sure that the Tiger machine has Remote Desktop enabled in its Sharing Prefs and that you have an account on the Tiger machine. Once that is done, the Tiger machine will automatically show up in the Leopard machine's Finder sidebar and all you have to do is click Share Screen.



    To control the Leopard machine from Tiger requires adding software to the Tiger machine, and I am not sure that the available methods actually work to control a Leopard machine. So I would not spend any money until that is established.
  • Reply 9 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jabohn View Post


    "Apple Remote Desktop" is what you want (if you don't have Leopard).



    "Apple Remote Access" is a completely different relic of OS 9 and not even related to desktop screen sharing.



    yep, my bad
  • Reply 10 of 19
    Personally I'm concerned that privacy will be endangered due to how screen sharing is implemented: it is too easy. Therefore it will also (maybe) be (too) tempting (not) to peek.



    And yes, I know that screen sharing has to be authorized for all this to be possible. But after that, it IS possible to observe _anyone_ using that computer. Whenever. And without them knowing.



    Not good.



    -matts
  • Reply 11 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by matts View Post


    Personally I'm concerned that privacy will be endangered due to how screen sharing is implemented: it is too easy. Therefore it will also (maybe) be (too) tempting (not) to peek.



    And yes, I know that screen sharing has to be authorized for all this to be possible. But after that, it IS possible to observe _anyone_ using that computer. Whenever. And without them knowing.



    Not good.



    -matts



    the only way the person viewing the other persons screen can not get booted is if they are logged in as the administrator. Yesterday i logged into my girlfriends computer ehile she was in class and was freaking her friends out when they realised she wasnt touching the computer.
  • Reply 12 of 19
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,430moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rich-Myster View Post


    the only way the person viewing the other persons screen can not get booted is if they are logged in as the administrator. Yesterday i logged into my girlfriends computer ehile she was in class and was freaking her friends out when they realised she wasnt touching the computer.



    I've had that kind of experience with a bluetooth mouse. Someone across the room at work had a mouse that had been paired with my computer and I didn't know this but every so often, my mouse just randomly moved across the screen. It was weird because it only came in range at random intervals.



    An easy solution I've used before for remotely controlling a computer is just to turn on remote desktop in the system prefs and then use Chicken of the VNC as a client. To get this to work across a network, just forward the router ports.
  • Reply 13 of 19
    outsideroutsider Posts: 6,008member
    Apple Remote Desktop is a complete remote management solution. It lets you control or observe another computer, copy files to that computer, do Spotlight or other searches on remote computers, run terminal commands (favorite way to set up printers remotely), do all manner or software and hardware reporting, and even install software with .pkg installers.
  • Reply 14 of 19
    tony1tony1 Posts: 258member
    Where can I find information on this if I'm running Netbarrier X4 and a Linky (ethernet) router? I have no clue how to set this up.



    Tony
  • Reply 15 of 19
    today i tried connecting to my girlfriend computer from home with the ip address it says, but i was sure it wasn't going to work. how do you connect to a computer on another network, besides using ichat?
  • Reply 16 of 19
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rich-Myster View Post


    today i tried connecting to my girlfriend computer from home with the ip address it says, but i was sure it wasn't going to work. how do you connect to a computer on another network, besides using ichat?



    How is the network configured? Is the computer that you are trying to connect to behind a router?
  • Reply 17 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    How is the network configured? Is the computer that you are trying to connect to behind a router?



    yes, router. not sure how it's configured though because my girlfriend was at work.
  • Reply 18 of 19
    Chicken of the VNC should work, and is free.



    http://sourceforge.net/projects/cotvnc/
  • Reply 19 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R View Post


    Chicken of the VNC should work, and is free.



    http://sourceforge.net/projects/cotvnc/



    Yes VNC will also work and it is not hard to setup..... Good call!
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