Verizon's 4G choice and the iPhone; Dell shipments slump in Q3

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  • Reply 21 of 31
    ajmasajmas Posts: 601member
    Does this mean Verizon is going to be adding GSM support? There is plenty of talk of compatible technologies and 4G is the article, but nothing explicitly stating adding support for GSM.



    EDIT: Looks like the answer is YES: http://www.engadget.com/2007/09/21/v...n-4g-networks/ - sweet
  • Reply 22 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    Ethernet is measured in bits, not bytes. 10 GB Ethernet is around the corner, but is still VERY expensive since it requires (so far) fiber.



    10GigE isn't "around the corner". It's shipping right now. But if you're not provisioning a wide area network, there's really no point, especially given current prices.



    There is especially no point to using it on personal systems - there's no way a desktop computer can saturate even a 1G line (not counting contrived tests, where the entire OS does nothing but generate packets.) Your computers don't even have internal buses capable of 10Gbps operation.



    10GigE, IMO, will remain in the domain of router manufacturers. It's great for aggregating lots of slower circuits, but rather pointless in small-scale networks.
  • Reply 23 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ajmas View Post


    Does this mean Verizon is going to be adding GSM support? There is plenty of talk of compatible technologies and 4G is the article, but nothing explicitly stating adding support for GSM.



    EDIT: Looks like the answer is YES: http://www.engadget.com/2007/09/21/v...n-4g-networks/ - sweet



    LTE is based on GSM tech. This doesn't necessarily mean that Verizon's 4G phones will be backwards-compatible with legacy GSM networks. They may very well contract for phones that use CDMA/1x/EVDO for backward compatibility (with their own network) and GSM/LTE only for 4G operation.



    Nothing in the Engadget article says Verizon will be supporting all legacy GSM tech as a part of this move, or that LTE support mandates legacy GSM support.



    Be careful about how much you read between the lines.
  • Reply 24 of 31
    ajmasajmas Posts: 601member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shamino View Post


    LTE is based on GSM tech. This doesn't necessarily mean that Verizon's 4G phones will be backwards-compatible with legacy GSM networks. They may very well contract for phones that use CDMA/1x/EVDO for backward compatibility (with their own network) and GSM/LTE only for 4G operation.



    Nothing in the Engadget article says Verizon will be supporting all legacy GSM tech as a part of this move, or that LTE support mandates legacy GSM support.



    Be careful about how much you read between the lines.



    The more I read about it the more I realise that this not simply adding GSM suport, but adding next generation GSM support. As you say whether that means adding support for current generation GSM phones, which use TDMA, is unclear.



    One thing that might make a difference in the future is covered by a Wired article on radios made of software .
  • Reply 25 of 31
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,573member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ajmas View Post


    Does this mean Verizon is going to be adding GSM support? There is plenty of talk of compatible technologies and 4G is the article, but nothing explicitly stating adding support for GSM.



    EDIT: Looks like the answer is YES: http://www.engadget.com/2007/09/21/v...n-4g-networks/ - sweet



    3G and 4G technologies are based on CDMA.
  • Reply 26 of 31
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Advice to Michael Dell: Close up shop, sell the company and return the money to the shareholders.



    That would be funnier if Dell hadn't just bought the company I work for. \
  • Reply 27 of 31
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,573member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shamino View Post


    10GigE isn't "around the corner". It's shipping right now. But if you're not provisioning a wide area network, there's really no point, especially given current prices.



    There is especially no point to using it on personal systems - there's no way a desktop computer can saturate even a 1G line (not counting contrived tests, where the entire OS does nothing but generate packets.) Your computers don't even have internal buses capable of 10Gbps operation.



    10GigE, IMO, will remain in the domain of router manufacturers. It's great for aggregating lots of slower circuits, but rather pointless in small-scale networks.



    When I say "around the corner" I mean for the average person. I know it's out.



    But, like the older 100 Mbs, and 1Gbs, the cost will be prohibitive for a while after the tchnology was available to corporate.



    I was considering buying $1,500 to $2,000 hubs and switches that had only one or two 100 Mbs, and later 1 Gbs ports amongst the other lower speed ports, and buying those $500+ cards for my machines, but decided to wait.



    Right now, Apple sells no card for the purpose, which is another reason why I said that it was around the corner. Though they do sell two 4Gb Fiber Channel cards. One is dual channel, and one is four.



    http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPL...8IsB6DJ/2.?p=0



    The Mac Pro also allows one to conglomerate the two 1 Gbs Ethernet ports for greater bandwidth, and you can add a multi port card that will add even more.



    It's true that few can even use this tecnology right now, but others can. It's also true that using a 10 Gbs Ethernet card in a Mac Pro is very feasable. The card can use 4, or even eight, channels to get the bandwidth it needs. This is the same way video cards, fiber channel, and conglomerated Ethernet, work, and the principle is the same. There are already 500 MBs (Byte, not bit) ESata towers available for uncompressed HD video editing that are useable on the Mac Pro, with the proper SATA card.



    This will be no different.



    Next year, when Express 2 is out, it will be even easier. I'm even hoping we see a new Mac Pro with that announced at MacWorld, though I'm not holding my breath. I hope Apple doesn't wait for Nehalem.
  • Reply 28 of 31
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    Looks like Verizon is hedging its bets against losing to Google in the FCC's January auction of 700 MHz spectrum.
  • Reply 29 of 31
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,573member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post


    Looks like Verizon is hedging its bets against losing to Google in the FCC's January auction of 700 MHz spectrum.



    The auction is what this is all about.
  • Reply 30 of 31
    Quote:

    Forbes

    The new a la carte service plan, which will be based on bandwidth use, could also be pricy. Verizon hasn't yet disclosed its pricing scheme.



    If Verizon increases prices that could effect you monetarily, you can get out of your Verizon contract without having to pay the Early Termination Fee. It is yet to be seen how Verizon's new pricing schemes could impact current Verizon customers.
  • Reply 31 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball View Post


    If Verizon increases prices that could effect you monetarily, you can get out of your Verizon contract without having to pay the Early Termination Fee. It is yet to be seen how Verizon's new pricing schemes could impact current Verizon customers.



    Contracts go both ways. When you sign up for a two-year commitment, it commits them to not change the terms. If they make changes that you don't agree with, they have to let you out.



    They won't do a thing to your existing contract. If they do choose to impose a new rate schedule, the new rates will take effect at your next renewal. They'll only take place immediately if your contract has expired and you chose to not renew.
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