Growing List of Apple's Laughing Stockboyz

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
As Apple ultimately becomes vidicated, it will engender a long line of "Wrong-Way Corrigans" who, standing on the edge of blackhole oblivion, insistently proclaim "There is too much fuss being made about gravity - ummmm, make that Apple!!" Apple's Trail of Tearz starts to the left:



1. MICHAEL MALONE (Author of Infinite Loop) - "Steve Jobs just can?t take on this juggernaut called Intel/Windows. Look at the combined market capitalization of Gateway, Dell, Compaq, Intel and Microsoft. That?s like two trillion dollars that he?s up against. And there almost 300 more. No matter how well he does, he?s still got himself a $15 or $20 billion company. The question is: Can Jobs do much more than he?s done right now? He?s up against 300 companies. No matter how clever Jobs is, the combined creativity and brainpower of 300 companies ultimately will defeat him. He didn?t believe that the first time around. I think he knows that now. That?s why I think he?s positioned Apple for the big exit. I suspect he?s shopping the place around.



I don?t want to say Steve Jobs is a one trick pony, but his two great successes are the Mac and the iMac and they?re both the same thing."



2. NATHAN MYHRVOLD - In discussing Apple's failure to bring the Copland operating system to market, Microsoft's Nathan Myhrvold says Apple had to suffer "the ultimate ignominy" of buying an operating system from the outside. This is a very ironic statement, considering that Bill Gates and Paul Allen bought a CP/M clone called 86-DOS and made some modifications. It was later known as MS-DOS!



3. MICHAEL DELL - When asked how to fix Apple, the head of Dell offers a rather drastic solution: "Close it and return the shareholders' money!"



4. STEVE BALLMER - (Nov 14, 2006) ... Microsoft's Zune Can Beat Apple's IPod, Ballmer Says



5. ED COLLIGAN - "Responding to questions from New York Times correspondent John Markoff at a Churchill Club breakfast gathering Thursday morning, Colligan laughed off the idea that any company -- including the wildly popular Apple Computer -- could easily win customers in the finicky smart-phone sector.



"We've learned and struggled for a few years here figuring out how to make a decent phone," he said. "PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They're not going to just walk in.'"



6. Jeff Zucker/George Kliavkoff (don't deserve to be capitalized) - "A move by NBC Universal to walk away or withdraw a large amount of content will probably hobble Apple?s efforts to move deeper into the sale of video-focused consumer electronics like the iPhone and a new class of iPods"



... and counting!
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 30
    Makking Woz #1 really doesn't do him justice.



    -t
  • Reply 2 of 30
    guarthoguartho Posts: 1,208member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by turtle777 View Post


    Makking Woz #1 really doesn't do him justice.



    -t



    QFT. The Woz always did and always will just want to do what makes him happy. He's not a greed-motivated individual. Working at Apple was no longer making him happy and he was already set for life financially. He really shouldn't be on a list of laughing stocks for choosing to leave a job he didn't want or need.
  • Reply 3 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    ... and counting! ...



    7. Ivan Seidenberg (Verizon boss) - "Steve Jobs eventually will get old" said Seidenberg, scoffing at Apple's iPhone sales so far. "There goes the conspiracy again. You're declaring them a winner before they've earned it on the field. Jobs has no monopoly on innovation!" [Ed. note: Enderle and Verizon was first approached by Apple to handle the iPhone exclusively, but dismissed the iPhone as unworthy.]



    8. Rob Enderle - "Business users should not be too quick to adopt the iPhone because flaws in the product may take time to surface ... Apple is one of those companies that could sell refrigerators to Eskimos, but that does not suggest that Eskimos should actually buy them. The problem is that Apple tends to lead on hype and does a good job controlling initial product reviews. It would be better for employees and their companies if purchases of the iPhone 3G were delayed until at least September (Ed. note: this is about the time RIM will try to roll out their new "iPhone-killer" model).
  • Reply 4 of 30
    not fsjnot fsj Posts: 12member
    No karma. All this negativity is reason for their depression. Apple will create the future and reap the rewards. Heads up and nose to the grind stone.
  • Reply 5 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    Growing List of Apple's Laughing Stockboyz

    As Apple ultimately becomes vidicated, it will engender a long line of "Wrong-Way Corrigans" who, standing on the edge of blackhole oblivion, insistently proclaim "There is too much fuss being made about gravity - ummmm, make that Apple!!" Apple's Trail of Tearz starts to the left:



    1. MICHAEL MALONE (Author of Infinite Loop) - "Steve Jobs just can’t take on this juggernaut called Intel/Windows. Look at the combined market capitalization of Gateway, Dell, Compaq, Intel and Microsoft. That’s like two trillion dollars that he’s up against. And there almost 300 more. No matter how well he does, he’s still got himself a $15 or $20 billion company. The question is: Can Jobs do much more than he’s done right now? He’s up against 300 companies. No matter how clever Jobs is, the combined creativity and brainpower of 300 companies ultimately will defeat him. He didn’t believe that the first time around. I think he knows that now. That’s why I think he’s positioned Apple for the big exit. I suspect he’s shopping the place around.



    I don’t want to say Steve Jobs is a one trick pony, but his two great successes are the Mac and the iMac and they’re both the same thing."



    2. NATHAN MYHRVOLD - In discussing Apple's failure to bring the Copland operating system to market, Microsoft's Nathan Myhrvold says Apple had to suffer "the ultimate ignominy" of buying an operating system from the outside. This is a very ironic statement, considering that Bill Gates and Paul Allen bought a CP/M clone called 86-DOS and made some modifications. It was later known as MS-DOS!



    3. MICHAEL DELL - When asked how to fix Apple, the head of Dell offers a rather drastic solution: "Close it and return the shareholders' money!"



    4. STEVE BALLMER - (Nov 14, 2006) ... Microsoft's Zune Can Beat Apple's IPod, Ballmer Says



    5. ED COLLIGAN - "Responding to questions from New York Times correspondent John Markoff at a Churchill Club breakfast gathering Thursday morning, Colligan laughed off the idea that any company -- including the wildly popular Apple Computer -- could easily win customers in the finicky smart-phone sector.



    "We've learned and struggled for a few years here figuring out how to make a decent phone," he said. "PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They're not going to just walk in.'"



    6. Jeff Zucker/George Kliavkoff (don't deserve to be capitalized) - "A move by NBC Universal to walk away or withdraw a large amount of content will probably hobble Apple’s efforts to move deeper into the sale of video-focused consumer electronics like the iPhone and a new class of iPods."



    7. Ivan Seidenberg (Verizon boss) - "Steve Jobs eventually will get old" said Seidenberg, scoffing at Apple's iPhone sales so far. "There goes the conspiracy again. You're declaring them a winner before they've earned it on the field. Jobs has no monopoly on innovation!" [Ed. note: Enderle and Verizon was first approached by Apple to handle the iPhone exclusively, but dismissed the iPhone as unworthy.]



    8. Rob Enderle - "Business users should not be too quick to adopt the iPhone because flaws in the product may take time to surface ... Apple is one of those companies that could sell refrigerators to Eskimos, but that does not suggest that Eskimos should actually buy them. The problem is that Apple tends to lead on hype and does a good job controlling initial product reviews. It would be better for employees and their companies if purchases of the iPhone 3G were delayed until at least September (Ed. note: this is about the time RIM will try to roll out their new "iPhone-killer" model).



    9. Monkey Boy Steve Ballmer #2 - Sept. 2008 - "Apple iPhone will utterly fail in next 5 years and we (MS) will win!" Of course, Monkey Boy had already spouted off about the demise of the iPhone before it was actually sold, but this comment comes after a huge sales trend and back to back product of the year awards have already been established.



    ... and the beat goes on!
  • Reply 6 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    10. Nicholas Deleon - (Anti-Apple Toadie/Spin Bloggist) - "NBC back on iTunes because Apple caved to network's demands. Let's all predict Apple's imminent demise!"



    "NBC left iTunes last year because Apple didn?t let it set its own prices for its content. That has now changed. NBC said that it?ll be selling certain, older TV shows for 99 cents a pop versus the ?normal,? Apple-set price of $1.99. NBC is also toying with the idea of creating ?best of? collections that it would sell at a price of its choosing. For example, maybe the five best episodes of The Office for $5 instead of $10."



    Let me see if dum'ol'me can follow this genius's reasoning. According to him, NBC left iTunes last year - NOT BECAUSE IT WANTED TO CHARGE MORE THAN WHAT APPLE ALLOWS, BUT BECAUSE IT WANTED TO CHARGE LESS!



    Now, according to Deleon, it is Apple that caves, in effect saying "Gee, we give up - we want you back, NBC - so much that you can now sell your listings for 99¢ each rather than the $1.99 we were making for you on each transaction, thereby allowing you to make the loss you always wanted and held out for so long rather than the heavy sales volume you were doing at the higher selling point."



    Of course, NBC tries to look as if it wanted to sell 99¢ TV shows all along - mean ol' Apple! - greedy bastards hat they are.



    Pay no attention to the fact that NBC originally wanted the ability to package some of its offerings for a premium price - something Apple does not allow - until now that is - let's see - hmmm - that's 5 of its most prized shows in a collection set which will now sell for - let's do the math - 5 x 99¢ = about $5. Yes, that's the price point NBC was looking for all along.



    Wow - thanks to NBC - we can all expect lower prices because of the outstanding example they have set.



    Prediction - 15 years from now - the man on the street will ask "What's NBC?" One year from now, the man on the street will ask "Who's Nicholas Deleon. Nothin' on goggle about him."
  • Reply 7 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    Sorry - double post.
  • Reply 8 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    11. Roger McNamee (investor in dead man walking Ed Colligan's Palm debacle) - his prognostication about the supposed upcoming release of the Palm Pre - "You know the beautiful thing: June 29, 2009 is the two year anniversary of the first shipment of the iPhone. Not one of those people will still be using an iPhone a month later."



    An obvious shrewd investor and smooth operator on the inside skinny, McNamee knows best, having done his homework. Ohhh! wait!! - did the original unsubsidized iPhone come with a two year contract? Nahhh - surely I must be wrong - tell me that McNamee and Wrong Way Colligan know better.



    As one Gizmodo post put it - "Hilarious. It's one thing to have bravado, but quite another to have a company on the brink of bankruptcy to call out the most successful mobile phone company."



    And the hits just keep on comin'...
  • Reply 9 of 30
    You could really expand the thread by posting some things that have been said around here.
  • Reply 10 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    King of the Wrong Way Corrigans, Monkey Boy Steve Ballmer was quoted this week by Techflash as saying:



    "Apple gained about one point, but now I think the tide has really turned back the other direction.

    The economy is helpful. Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment - same piece of hardware - paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be.



    It continues to amaze how someone like Bill Gates can in any way leave a legacy like MicroSoft for a gentleman like Steve Ballmer to completely screw up!



    And the hits just keep on comin'...
  • Reply 11 of 30
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Monkey Boy still doesn't get it.
  • Reply 12 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    12. Truly the lapsit exillis of all damnations by faint praise, (if Ballmer is the King of the Wrong-Way Corrigans) then the Emperor himself, Bill Gates, has sealed the success of the iPad for all time by disapproving comments directed at the iPad during his recent visit with Brent Schlender of BNET where he was quoted as saying:



    ""So, it’s not like I sit there and feel the same way I did with iPhone where I say, 'Oh my God, Microsoft didn’t aim high enough.' It's a nice reader, but there’s nothing on the iPad I look at and say, 'Oh, I wish Microsoft had done it.'"



    Of course, this contradicts an earlier byte from MacDailyNews ( September 2, 2004) where Gates was similarly quoted as saying an uncannily identical quip about the iPod (which, in true Gatesian style, completely contradicts his recent comment about his initial feelings about the iPod above):



    "There's nothing that the iPod does that I say, 'Oh, wow, I don't think we can do that.'" - Bill Gates, September 02, 2004.



    He-he, he is obviously bowled over by the realization that he won't be able to make a dime off of the devices in terms of software sales, unlike many small developers who will make a fortune.



    Given the prospect that no MicroSoft software income will come from yet another of Steve Jobs' innovation game-changers, MS will be "forced" to get on board in the only way Jobs has left open for them - on the hardware side of the street.



    I can see it now: As iPod has led to iPad, so will the Zune lead to the Zane!



    Surely the genuises at MS will take all that they have "learned" from the school of hard knocks and apply this wisdom vigorously to what this time will hopefully be an unbridled and unparalleled spending spree in an effort to catch Apple.



    Just to make it fair, the usual handicapping should apply: giving Apple a minimum two year head start; and the use of aging technology from another company to manufacture the Zane, preferably under the eagle eye of Monkey Boy Steve Ballmer whose deft and critical touch was unmistakeable in the ordering and delivery of Zunes in the exact same shade of brown Ballmer had earlier insisted on when he went to the trouble of suppling the exact pantone hue to the manufacturer in a specimen bag.
  • Reply 13 of 30
    All these A-Holes speak about apple as you posted, however you never say what you think about it all. What confuses me is that all the negative post you have put up and no dates to them. Are they 2010 current to Apple's success? Again what why post all this? What is you point? Are you for Apple or just some Microsoft Crony trying to ruin someone's day.



    Answered one: 2004, 2006 statements
  • Reply 14 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RussellSakay View Post


    All these A-Holes speak about apple as you posted, however you never say what you think about it all. What confuses me is that all the negative post you have put up and no dates to them. Are they 2010 current to Apple's success? Again what why post all this? What is you point? Are you for Apple or just some Microsoft Crony trying to ruin someone's day.



    Answered one: 2004, 2006 statements



    Sorry RussellSakay about the quality of the thread and my posts in particular. I've reread them and am inclined to agree with you - nobody enjoys reading a thread that leaves gaping holes for the reader to fill. Again - sorry for the confusion - it certainly was not my intention.



    As to the missing dates, please note that there are some dates on the quotes - but I agree that there are no dates on most of them. When they were posted, the items noted were usually highlighted within the same timeframe on a popular Apple or PC web newsite so the reader would probably not be curious as to whether the quote was authentic or not.



    I must say that I never considered the possibility that a quote that was in the public mind when made, might later be subject to an increased scrutiny when reviewed by someone with fresh eyes, but such is obviously the case. You are quite right - I should have done that and will make a note to do so in the future. I am at least partially gratified that the post I made yesterday is properly dated.



    As to the rationale behind my posting and the point I wish to make, again I must thank you for bringing to my attention the need for clarification. Not to be too wishy but English is not my first language but I try hard to be proficient in it - sometimes too much apparently.



    The point of this post is to provide an ongoing list or a type of archive - not too detailed or comprehensive - of what seems to me to be a growing trend of non-Apple people who evince a certain pattern that seems to repeat itself. This pattern is usually one of disrespect for Apple and/or Mr. Steve Jobs, whereby either or both are dismissed or subject to ridicule by some spokesperson who is typically a competitor or a MicroSoft ally, only to have it later blow up in their face as the saying goes.



    History, even recent history, is often replete with such patterns and it provides an interesting perspective to see so many people (who are committed to diminishing Apple's efforts) end up suffering the same fate of ridicule that they had hoped for Apple.



    I am definitely for Apple because I see it as a quintessential archetype of an American underdog story - where a company of vision and passion is beset on all sides by fierce detractors - how you might say "Cry havoc - and let slip the dogs of war!" Yet because of their unswerving commitment to delivering a vision intact which results in a certain joy for the end-user, they will ultimately win out in the end if they stay committed to this pursuit - as I believe time will tell.



    I might not understand your reference to "a MicroSoft crony trying to ruin someone's day" - but I will take it as a question of whether I am such a person. The answer is definitely not - although until relatively recently, I did own a small stake in MicroSoft stock and was finding that I got continually more anxious when I saw MicroSoft do things (often in seeming opposition to Apple) that did not seem in the best interests of the company (at least to the perspective of the tiny investor that I was). The most difficult thing for me was when I saw MicroSoft react to Apple and seemingly fail to reflexively act or even understand the nature of the Apple initiative. That is why I post this.



    While it is my nature to let the chips fall where they may, I must say that I would like it just as fine if my remarks ultimately did not ruin someone's day - as opposed to making one feel uncomfortable for remarks made (as your post has done to me). However, when one goes online and posts a remark, they should stand for the attention it receives - both me in my limited capacity as a small time poster and even Mr. Bill Gates, the Chairperson of one of the largest corporations in the world.



    As I am sure time will tell, Mr. Gates will find out that he has overlooked the ramifications of what the iPad presents and ultimately offers as a game-changing device. I for one as familiar with a British company who is at the forefront of whiteboard technology and who is excited by the prospects of extending their whiteboard experience in the educational classroom by putting an iPad in the hands of teachers and students and letting them control the learning experience by active touchscreen at their student desks. This alone should be huge over the conventional Wacom style bluetooth wireless tablets which have no screen and are little more than a remote mouse.



    While I do not really wish to "ruin Mr. Gate's day", I am sure he couldn't care less what legacy his calculated remarks ultimately engender if they hit the mark intended when first uttered.



    Again, I thank you for making your remarks very much. My wife who I respect very much for her English says that my word choice is too big for my bite so I must also apologize for that beforehand but it will save me much time if you will politely overlook the indiscretion. This is maybe why I don't talk more when I post because I realize I do not want to be too confusing.



    Sorry for any misunderstanding and thank you for taking the time to write. I appreciate it. Go Apple!!
  • Reply 15 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by meh 2 View Post


    Sorry RussellSakay about the quality of the thread and my posts in particular. I've reread them and am inclined to agree with you - nobody enjoys reading a thread that leaves gaping holes for the reader to fill. Again - sorry for the confusion - it certainly was not my intention.



    As to the missing dates, please note that there are some dates on the quotes - but I agree that there are no dates on most of them. When they were posted, the items noted were usually highlighted within the same timeframe on a popular Apple or PC web newsite so the reader would probably not be curious as to whether the quote was authentic or not.



    I must say that I never considered the possibility that a quote that was in the public mind when made, might later be subject to an increased scrutiny when reviewed by someone with fresh eyes, but such is obviously the case. You are quite right - I should have done that and will make a note to do so in the future. I am at least partially gratified that the post I made yesterday is properly dated.



    As to the rationale behind my posting and the point I wish to make, again I must thank you for bringing to my attention the need for clarification. Not to be too wishy but English is not my first language but I try hard to be proficient in it - sometimes too much apparently.



    The point of this post is to provide an ongoing list or a type of archive - not too detailed or comprehensive - of what seems to me to be a growing trend of non-Apple people who evince a certain pattern that seems to repeat itself. This pattern is usually one of disrespect for Apple and/or Mr. Steve Jobs, whereby either or both are dismissed or subject to ridicule by some spokesperson who is typically a competitor or a MicroSoft ally, only to have it later blow up in their face as the saying goes.



    History, even recent history, is often replete with such patterns and it provides an interesting perspective to see so many people (who are committed to diminishing Apple's efforts) end up suffering the same fate of ridicule that they had hoped for Apple.



    I am definitely for Apple because I see it as a quintessential archetype of an American underdog story - where a company of vision and passion is beset on all sides by fierce detractors - how you might say "Cry havoc - and let slip the dogs of war!" Yet because of their unswerving commitment to delivering a vision intact which results in a certain joy for the end-user, they will ultimately win out in the end if they stay committed to this pursuit - as I believe time will tell.



    I might not understand your reference to "a MicroSoft crony trying to ruin someone's day" - but I will take it as a question of whether I am such a person. The answer is definitely not - although until relatively recently, I did own a small stake in MicroSoft stock and was finding that I got continually more anxious when I saw MicroSoft do things (often in seeming opposition to Apple) that did not seem in the best interests of the company (at least to the perspective of the tiny investor that I was). The most difficult thing for me was when I saw MicroSoft react to Apple and seemingly fail to reflexively act or even understand the nature of the Apple initiative. That is why I post this.



    While it is my nature to let the chips fall where they may, I must say that I would like it just as fine if my remarks ultimately did not ruin someone's day - as opposed to making one feel uncomfortable for remarks made (as your post has done to me). However, when one goes online and posts a remark, they should stand for the attention it receives - both me in my limited capacity as a small time poster and even Mr. Bill Gates, the Chairperson of one of the largest corporations in the world.



    As I am sure time will tell, Mr. Gates will find out that he has overlooked the ramifications of what the iPad presents and ultimately offers as a game-changing device. I for one as familiar with a British company who is at the forefront of whiteboard technology and who is excited by the prospects of extending their whiteboard experience in the educational classroom by putting an iPad in the hands of teachers and students and letting them control the learning experience by active touchscreen at their student desks. This alone should be huge over the conventional Wacom style bluetooth wireless tablets which have no screen and are little more than a remote mouse.



    While I do not really wish to "ruin Mr. Gate's day", I am sure he couldn't care less what legacy his calculated remarks ultimately engender if they hit the mark intended when first uttered.



    Again, I thank you for making your remarks very much. My wife who I respect very much for her English says that my word choice is too big for my bite so I must also apologize for that beforehand but it will save me much time if you will politely overlook the indiscretion. This is maybe why I don't talk more when I post because I realize I do not want to be too confusing.



    Sorry for any misunderstanding and thank you for taking the time to write. I appreciate it. Go Apple!!



    My intension was not to anger you or make you think I was just some Mac Dick. I wanted to know the purpose of all this feedback you have cut and pasted in this forum.
  • Reply 16 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RussellSakay View Post


    My intension was not to anger you or make you think I was just some Mac Dick. I wanted to know the purpose of all this feedback you have cut and pasted in this forum.



    No, no. Please. I certainly do not think that. I hoped to convey that I actually appreciated your remarks. I believe they were on target and I needed to hear them. I hope I have answered your good question - probably too much!



    Again, I thank you for your time and hope to hear from you some time again, my friend.
  • Reply 17 of 30
    Can we include people from AI?



    Oh wait . . . the list would run for hundreds of pages.
  • Reply 18 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Can we include people from AI?



    Oh wait . . . the list would run for hundreds of pages.



    Yes, if we included AI posters that would easily generate the longest thread ever.
  • Reply 19 of 30
    aizmovaizmov Posts: 988member
    @ meh 2

    too soon

    the iPad could flop, and this is from an iPad-believer like me

    but I sure hope it is a success



    Quote:

    I can see it now: As iPod has led to iPad, so will the Zune lead to the Zane!



    Zane: be inZane
  • Reply 20 of 30
    meh 2meh 2 Posts: 149member
    And so it continues, the endless parade of those who just do not "get it." As another thread (please see "The iPad has no market and the iPhone is not popular according to..." by Mac Voyer - General Discussion) on this forum so aptly put it, some of these individuals obviously must live in "alternate universes."



    The latest and most noteworthy laughingstock is none other than who should be Apple's chief competitor and the one who would spur Apple on to improve their own products - namely, Research In Motion!!!



    This time from RIM's (read that Blackberry's) President & Co-Chief Executive Officer Mike Lazaridis, who downplayed many of Apple's efforts today, April 16th 2010, in a keynote at the TD Newcrest technology conference in Toronto.



    The sum of his remarks? - NO MARKET FOR TABLETS or TOUCH-ONLY PHONES!! - a view only preposterous, of course, when considered from the narrow perspective of this known universe, given that Mr. Lazaridis is, according to RIM's own executive bio page, "known in the global wireless community as a visionary, innovator, and engineer of extraordinary talent."



    One can almost imagine "Steve Jobs, after skimming over the day's newsworthy events and reading the quote from Lazaridis, at that point turning back to an unanswered memo from his earlier director's meeting where the question had come up as to whether to include cutting edge innovations in screen and software improvements in the upcoming summer iPhone release (which would cut into Apple's profit), and sending a simple "thumbs down" icon as a famous Steve response back to those awaiting his decision. Why should we, Steve might ponder, when Pre is down, HTC's balls are soon to be squeezed, and this is the consensus from RIM's "visionary guru." Given this outlook, Steve resists the urge to freeze and halt all iPhone research and improvement for the next 3 years and turn instead to consolidating Apple's satellite network plans."



    To wit: <http://www.electronista.com/articles/10/04/16/rim.co.ceo.questions.ipad.iphone.staying.power/>.



    13. RIM's co-chief Mike Lazaridis downplayed many of Apple's efforts today in a keynote at the TD Newcrest technology conference in Toronto. The executive was concerned that there wasn't necessarily a market for tablets like the iPad and that any devices would have to be put in the context of computers and smartphones. Many companies ask new hires to choose either a new smartphone or a new notebook, and if the tablet is simply a substitute for a notebook it may not have an easy answer, Lazaridis said. He added that smartphones are getting more powerful and more computer like, and by extension would reduce the need for a tablet.



    The company leader also dismissed the importance of touchscreen phones. While it's important to give customers what they want, touch-only phones like the iPhone aren't that popular, Lazaridis argued. He claimed that most of the people buying touchscreen phones are going back to phones with hardware QWERTY keyboards, like those that made RIM "famous."



    He pointed out that it was the experience and not the features that determined a phone's success, and that the most popular BlackBerry was actually the starter Curve 8520. It not only lacks touch but 3G and a high-resolution screen.



    With "wrong-way Corrigans" like this, Apple seems almost unfairly benefitted due to an utter lack of competition from what should be viable corporate entities desirous of making a better mousetrap.
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