Windows 7 starts race with Apple to full multi-touch desktop OS

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Comments

  • Reply 101 of 106
    Hmm I have an iPhone and I do have keep cleaning the screen if I want to see pictures clearly. My iMac at work doesn't like people touching the screen either, smudges all the time, quite a nuisance actually. (Never understood why people have to touch a screen to SHOW me something)

    Whereas the multi-touch mouse-pad on the Mac Laptops is pretty cool to work with.

  • Reply 102 of 106
    isoftisoft Posts: 1member
    hello all,



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  • Reply 103 of 106
    vineavinea Posts: 5,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Many times, the keyboard shortcuts are a faster way to do things. Just taking your hand off the keyboard between text entry and control and back can rob productivity, especially if it's an action in a submenu somewhere vs just hitting two keys.



    This is incorrect. To quote Tog:



    "
    • Test subjects report that keyboarding is faster than mousing.

    • The stopwatch consistently proves mousing is faster than keyboarding.

    This contradiction between user-experience and reality apparently forms the basis for many user/developers? belief that the keyboard is faster.



    People new to the mouse find the process of acquiring it every time they want to do anything other than type to be incredibly time-wasting. And therein lies the very advantage of the mouse: it is boring to find it because the two-second search does not require high-level cognitive engagement.



    It takes two seconds to decide upon which special-function key to press. Deciding among abstract symbols is a high-level cognitive function. Not only is this decision not boring, the user actually experiences amnesia! Real amnesia! The time-slice spent making the decision simply ceases to exist."



    http://www.asktog.com/TOI/toi06KeyboardVMouse1.html



    Caveats:
    • Shortcuts that are committed to muscle memory are faster since the cognitive load is lower. This is stuff like ctrl-x, c, v for cut, copy and paste and any application specific shortcut you use so often it's "second nature".

    • This may no longer be true if you're using a dual monitor setup and the menu is on the wrong one.

    So it's not "many times" but in reality "a few times". Also, the reason that Apple went with a one button mouse is the assumption that the other hand is still on the keyboard and able to provide the required context information (cmd, ctrl, short) for what the button click means.



    In practice the keys are IMHO too far from the home position to be useful in two-handed input UI design a la Engelbart and users, even seasoned Mac users, don't appear to make those keys the new "home" position when mousing.



    That statement is not backed up by empirical data...hence the IMHO. Just casual observation.



    Anything not measured in an experimental environment is hugely subject to human perception errors.
  • Reply 104 of 106
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by vinea View Post


    This is incorrect. To quote Tog:



    "
    • Test subjects report that keyboarding is faster than mousing.

    • The stopwatch consistently proves mousing is faster than keyboarding.

    This contradiction between user-experience and reality apparently forms the basis for many user/developers’ belief that the keyboard is faster.



    People new to the mouse find the process of acquiring it every time they want to do anything other than type to be incredibly time-wasting. And therein lies the very advantage of the mouse: it is boring to find it because the two-second search does not require high-level cognitive engagement.



    So maybe using the mouse makes me so bored out of my skull that using the high level cognitive engagement is what prevents me from going postal.



    Quote:

    Caveats:
    • Shortcuts that are committed to muscle memory are faster since the cognitive load is lower. This is stuff like ctrl-x, c, v for cut, copy and paste and any application specific shortcut you use so often it's "second nature".

    • This may no longer be true if you're using a dual monitor setup and the menu is on the wrong one.




    I'm satisfied with that, that's pretty much what I meant. I wonder if the size / resolution of the screen would also have an impact, it sounds like they might have been doing their testing with the original Mac. Not only that, computer applications are a lot more complex these days. Maybe those two would cancel each other out, I don't know. Cmd-i seems to have the biggest edge vs. "get info", for some reason, I get confused trying to find it in the menu, it's not in a consistent place even if many different kinds of app use it.
  • Reply 105 of 106
    alandailalandail Posts: 696member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    So maybe using the mouse makes me so bored out of my skull that using the high level cognitive engagement is what prevents me from going postal.



    The problem is that high level cognitive engagement interrupts the high level thinking you are applying to the presumably higher level task you are using the computer for in the first place.
  • Reply 106 of 106
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    The problem is that high level cognitive engagement interrupts the high level thinking you are applying to the presumably higher level task you are using the computer for in the first place.



    I would think that saying I'm getting bored using the computer would imply that I'm not doing such a high level task.



    But I think the quote by vinea showed that someone that uses a particular command a lot is going to benefit from hot keys. Occasional use, occasional enough that you don't remember the combination without thinking, is going to cause problems.
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