Brick = New Manufacturing process

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
after reading this im now v



http://9to5mac.com/macbook-brick

http://www.engadget.com/2008/10/05/a...macbook-brick/



does anyone have any ideas how true this can be, cause ive been waiting for a new macbook for a 2 months
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    We already have a discussion going on about this:

    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...t=91061&page=3
  • Reply 2 of 25
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Steve Jobs frickin' built his own damn factory! Holy f*K.
  • Reply 3 of 25
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spikeme View Post


    after reading this im now v



    http://9to5mac.com/macbook-brick

    http://www.engadget.com/2008/10/05/a...macbook-brick/



    does anyone have any ideas how true this can be, cause ive been waiting for a new macbook for a 2 months



    It's been taking that bloody long because they friggin' BUILT THEIR OWN FACTORY TO MAKE THEM. HOLY F***K.
  • Reply 4 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fishyesque View Post


    We already have a discussion going on about this:

    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...t=91061&page=3



    opps sorry about that
  • Reply 5 of 25
    irelandireland Posts: 17,493member
    This is a lot of *****. Sorry it is. Not buying it, at all at all.
  • Reply 6 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    This is a lot of *****. Sorry it is. Not buying it, at all at all.



    I agree. Not one part of this rumor sounds plausible to me.
  • Reply 7 of 25
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,195moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post


    I agree. Not one part of this rumor sounds plausible to me.



    There are a number of questionable factors. Like how did no-one find out about it. But nobody knew who bought PA Semi at first and that was a big deal. Factories get built all the time so it's not a high profile activity and they could have disguised it as something else. They could have hired Apple employees to work there. Maybe even PA Semi workers - after all, what do they do when the iphones and ipods don't need updated? As they said about the Next factory, Apple had more PhD's in there than designing the computers.



    Those workers would never leak a story under NDA.



    The cost aspect is another issue. Dell is closing factories to save money so why would Apple open one to save money. The idea here is that Apple have a more advanced plant. Dell have lots of people who do donkey work. Paying 1600 employees costs a lot more than say 200 employees with advanced equipment.



    Apple also don't have to meet the same level of demand as Dell. They turn out about 25,000 computers per shift. Based on quarterly ship quantities, Dell do about 6 million and Apple have recently achieved 3 million. Apple therefore only have to do 12,000 per shift.



    This may not save huge amounts of money at first but think of all the warranty repairs. If they make better machines, there's less of those to deal with and they get a better reputation so that helps improve sales. Their quality control has been slipping for a while and it's only a matter of time before that turns into a reputation.



    They will probably be able to keep tighter tabs on leaks of new products too - i.e no photos from inside the factory.



    What would be very annoying is if after all this speculation, Jobs just says:



    'Oh and one more thing... we've made a cup holder so you don't knock over your drink onto your laptop. We're calling it the brick, isn't that neat? That's all for today, see you in January.'
  • Reply 8 of 25
    pbpb Posts: 4,231member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


    What would be very annoying is if after all this speculation, Jobs just says:



    'Oh and one more thing... we've made a cup holder so you don't knock over your drink onto your laptop. We're calling it the brick, isn't that neat? That's all for today, see you in January.'



    Good one!



    Or: look at this new power adaptor with the retractable plug! Like a brick, isn't it?
  • Reply 9 of 25
    Of all the rumors I have read on this and other Apple fanboy websites, this is by far the most interesting and significant - if it is true, that is.



    Those of you who have exclaimed: 'Holy Sh*t! Jobs has built a brand new frickin' factory!' echo my own sentiments entirely. While 3D laser CNC cutting machines represent the state-of-the-art in high tech manufacturing, they will indeed give us higher quality computers that are more robust as well as being lighter. In other words, this represents a significant hardware upgrade. The elegance of the design with a ruthless adherence to function that defines intelligent form - with aesthetic beauty the agreeable by-product, We're gonna be lusting after these new computers as if they were made out of solid gold.



    But there's a bigger story here. If Apple gets this right, what it heralds is a manufacturing revolution not just for computers, mobile phones and other high tech stuff, but for manufacturing as a whole. I would love to see manufacturing return to the USA (just as i'd like us to stop depending on the Middle East oil). Automation will level the economic playing field again. That can't happen soon enough. If it happens in computers, it could also happen in the Auto Industry.



    Steve Jobs is an extraordinary man and I'm beginning to think his contribution to society may soon elevate him above Bill Gates. The sheer depth and breadth of vision he has are quite astonishing.
  • Reply 10 of 25
    jruijrui Posts: 24member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crocodile View Post


    Of all the rumors I have read on this and other Apple fanboy websites, this is by far the most interesting and significant - if it is true, that is.



    Those of you who have exclaimed: 'Holy Sh*t! Jobs has built a brand new frickin' factory!' echo my own sentiments entirely. While 3D laser CNC cutting machines represent the state-of-the-art in high tech manufacturing, they will indeed give us higher quality computers that are more robust as well as being lighter. In other words, this represents a significant hardware upgrade. The elegance of the design with a ruthless adherence to function that defines intelligent form - with aesthetic beauty the agreeable by-product, We're gonna be lusting after these new computers as if they were made out of solid gold.



    But there's a bigger story here. If Apple gets this right, what it heralds is a manufacturing revolution not just for computers, mobile phones and other high tech stuff, but for manufacturing as a whole. I would love to see manufacturing return to the USA (just as i'd like us to stop depending on the Middle East oil). Automation will level the economic playing field again. That can't happen soon enough. If it happens in computers, it could also happen in the Auto Industry.



    Steve Jobs is an extraordinary man and I'm beginning to think his contribution to society may soon elevate him above Bill Gates. The sheer depth and breadth of vision he has are quite astonishing.



    That's a refreshing Post.
  • Reply 11 of 25
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    The rumor is utter bullshit. Carving cases out of solid bricks of metal creates a shit ton of waste. The process would be too expensive. The waste metal that has been carved out of the block would have to be melted back into a new brick to be carved.



    Unless Apple is prepared to absorb the costs that such a process would needlessly create, more expensive MacBooks will not fly in the eyes of consumers facing a recession or a possible depression.



    Conclusion: rumor is utter bullshit...or Apple is in deep bullshit.
  • Reply 12 of 25
    So... what about all the photos of notebook parts that were supposedly real? Are people ignoring those now for the fancy new rumor?



    This doesn't seem the least bit practical. Once again people setting themselves up for disappointment.
  • Reply 13 of 25
    sequitursequitur Posts: 1,901member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post


    Steve Jobs frickin' built his own damn factory! Holy f*K.





    As in brick 'and mortar'?
  • Reply 14 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post


    The rumor is utter bullshit. Carving cases out of solid bricks of metal creates a shit ton of waste. The process would be too expensive. The waste metal that has been carved out of the block would have to be melted back into a new brick to be carved.



    Unless Apple is prepared to absorb the costs that such a process would needlessly create, more expensive MacBooks will not fly in the eyes of consumers facing a recession or a possible depression.



    Conclusion: rumor is utter bullshit...or Apple is in deep bullshit.



    Sorry to be rude, but you obviously know nothing about CNC milling. The process was designed to reduce waste as much as to increase precision. I'm not saying that the Apple rumor is true; it may well prove to be bullshit, but, if it is, it won't be for the reasons you state. Thousands of hi-tech industrial firms already utilize CNC machines without creating massive amounts of waste. Take Pratt & Witney or Rolls Royce who make aero engines. They use 3D laser cutting for manufacturing turbofan blades. Obviously, precision is absolutely essential, but the sheer cost of aircraft grade titanium alloy means nothing can be wasted. So the process maximizes the number of parts that can be cut form a single billet of metal. These guys design the production process as thoroughly as they engineer the required end products.



    What this means for Apple is that it might cut a MacBook case in two halves that slide together so tightly no screws, glue or welding are needed. Without pressing or bending the metal to create the sides, the entire structure would be exponentially stronger and lighter. The metal pieces cut from the block would not be wasted but used to make other components, such as interior plates, battery covers, or even entirely different products such as iPods. The intelligent part of the process is selecting the raw material shape used as the start point.



    Of most significance, an automated production line with CNC-type machinery would dramatically cuts labor costs. This is probably the single biggest cost item of any new Apple product.



    Almost as important, a single CNC machine can easily be reconfigured to produce a variety of product types. That means production volumes can easily be ramped up (or down) to suit prevailing demand. This in itself is highly efficient.



    The other major cost related to such technology is the energy required to power the machinery. But, if Apple were to generate its own electricity, e.g. through having a solar-powered plant in New Mexico, then you are talking about a game-changing approach to manufacturing.



    When you consider these factors together, you can see why this rumor is so interesting. It is modern day industrial revolution. Personally, I have learned to expect nothing less from Apple.
  • Reply 15 of 25
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,185member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crocodile View Post


    Sorry to be rude, but you obviously know nothing about CNC milling. The process was designed to reduce waste as much as to increase precision. I'm not saying that the Apple rumor is true; it may well prove to be bullshit, but, if it is, it won't be for the reasons you state. Thousands of hi-tech industrial firms already utilize CNC machines without creating massive amounts of waste. Take Pratt & Witney or Rolls Royce who make aero engines. They use 3D laser cutting for manufacturing turbofan blades. Obviously, precision is absolutely essential, but the sheer cost of aircraft grade titanium alloy means nothing can be wasted. So the process maximizes the number of parts that can be cut form a single billet of metal. These guys design the production process as thoroughly as they engineer the required end products.



    What this means for Apple is that it might cut a MacBook case in two halves that slide together so tightly no screws, glue or welding are needed. Without pressing or bending the metal to create the sides, the entire structure would be exponentially stronger and lighter. The metal pieces cut from the block would not be wasted but used to make other components, such as interior plates, battery covers, or even entirely different products such as iPods. The intelligent part of the process is selecting the raw material shape used as the start point.



    Of most significance, an automated production line with CNC-type machinery would dramatically cuts labor costs. This is probably the single biggest cost item of any new Apple product.



    Almost as important, a single CNC machine can easily be reconfigured to produce a variety of product types. That means production volumes can easily be ramped up (or down) to suit prevailing demand. This in itself is highly efficient.



    The other major cost related to such technology is the energy required to power the machinery. But, if Apple were to generate its own electricity, e.g. through having a solar-powered plant in New Mexico, then you are talking about a game-changing approach to manufacturing.



    When you consider these factors together, you can see why this rumor is so interesting. It is modern day industrial revolution. Personally, I have learned to expect nothing less from Apple.



    Agreed. The person is not a Mechanical Engiener and never has taken Manufacturing and Processing Labs which are part of the M.E./Material Science curriculum a part of all ABET accredited US Universities.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crocodile View Post


    Sorry to be rude, but you obviously know nothing about CNC milling. The process was designed to reduce waste as much as to increase precision. I'm not saying that the Apple rumor is true; it may well prove to be bullshit, but, if it is, it won't be for the reasons you state. Thousands of hi-tech industrial firms already utilize CNC machines without creating massive amounts of waste. Take Pratt & Witney or Rolls Royce who make aero engines. They use 3D laser cutting for manufacturing turbofan blades. Obviously, precision is absolutely essential, but the sheer cost of aircraft grade titanium alloy means nothing can be wasted. So the process maximizes the number of parts that can be cut form a single billet of metal. These guys design the production process as thoroughly as they engineer the required end products.



    What this means for Apple is that it might cut a MacBook case in two halves that slide together so tightly no screws, glue or welding are needed. Without pressing or bending the metal to create the sides, the entire structure would be exponentially stronger and lighter. The metal pieces cut from the block would not be wasted but used to make other components, such as interior plates, battery covers, or even entirely different products such as iPods. The intelligent part of the process is selecting the raw material shape used as the start point.



    Of most significance, an automated production line with CNC-type machinery would dramatically cuts labor costs. This is probably the single biggest cost item of any new Apple product.



    Almost as important, a single CNC machine can easily be reconfigured to produce a variety of product types. That means production volumes can easily be ramped up (or down) to suit prevailing demand. This in itself is highly efficient.



    The other major cost related to such technology is the energy required to power the machinery. But, if Apple were to generate its own electricity, e.g. through having a solar-powered plant in New Mexico, then you are talking about a game-changing approach to manufacturing.



    When you consider these factors together, you can see why this rumor is so interesting. It is modern day industrial revolution. Personally, I have learned to expect nothing less from Apple.





    That's all fine and dandy except that you've said nothing about how the process would reduce waste. Simply saying that it does or that "precision" will reduce the waste doesn't cut it.



    Please explain what Apple is going to do with the metal that has been carved out of the block...are they going to use it for other products? You can't use the carved out metal for another MacBook since you're left with volume to work with.



    Perhaps if there were different size MacBooks, they could carve out a block that is smaller from the bigger block...but this is a long shot hypothesis.



    Until you explain how waste will be reduced, I will consider your more ignorant than I am. Your aircraft engine example doesn't apply here...Apple isn't making aircraft engines. Cutting blades with lasers is not the same as carving a solid block to accommodate computer parts.
  • Reply 17 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post


    That's all fine and dandy except that you've said nothing about how the process would reduce waste. Simply saying that it does or that "precision" will reduce the waste doesn't cut it.



    Please explain what Apple is going to do with the metal that has been carved out of the block...are they going to use it for other products? You can't use the carved out metal for another MacBook since you're left with volume to work with.



    Perhaps if there were different size MacBooks, they could carve out a block that is smaller from the bigger block...but this is a long shot hypothesis.



    Until you explain how waste will be reduced, I will consider your more ignorant than I am. Your aircraft engine example doesn't apply here...Apple isn't making aircraft engines. Cutting blades with lasers is not the same as carving a solid block to accommodate computer parts.



    you simply melt down the scraps adn reform the bricks
  • Reply 18 of 25
    joelsaltjoelsalt Posts: 827member
    "i will consider you more ignorant than I am"

    ... what a beautifully ironically ignorant thing to say.



    well, the precision of the cut would use the maximum amount of the block for different parts of different products, and like zerfman says, the scraps could be re-formed (at not that great of cost, compared with the whole process and the savings)
  • Reply 19 of 25
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post


    "i will consider you more ignorant than I am"

    ... what a beautifully ironically ignorant thing to say.



    well, the precision of the cut would use the maximum amount of the block for different parts of different products, and like zerfman says, the scraps could be re-formed (at not that great of cost, compared with the whole process and the savings)



    Yes, and I said earlier that the melting part would be the sole reason why this process would be expensive.



    You're talking out of your ass when you're saying that melting it back into a block is inexpensive compared to the process as a whole. I very much doubt that Apple has its own foundry as well.



    I find it highly amusing when people like zerfman and yourself repeat what I said in my earlier post as if you guys are bringing new information to my attention...but I know reading is hard for some AppleInsider members.



    edit: Seems like writing is hard too for you guys with problems ranging from missing punctuation marks to not capitalizing the first letter of a sentence. I shouldn't even bother answering posts from people that put so little effort into their replies.
  • Reply 20 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post


    Yes, and I said earlier that the melting part would be the sole reason why this process would be expensive.



    You're talking out of your ass when you're saying that melting it back into a block is inexpensive compared to the process as a whole. I very much doubt that Apple has its own foundry as well.



    I find it highly amusing when people like zerfman and yourself repeat what I said in my earlier post as if you guys are bringing new information to my attention...but I know reading is hard for some AppleInsider members.



    edit: Seems like writing is hard too for you guys with problems ranging from missing punctuation marks to not capitalizing the first letter of a sentence. I shouldn't even bother answering posts from people that put so little effort into their replies.



    Well excuse me if im a full time student and in my spare time i like to comment and add useful bits of information to help other people. i am truly sorry that i dont have all day like you to formulate, do rough drafts, edit, and re edit my posts before putting them out there to be ridiculed like individuals such as yourself. there is no need for such blatant rudeness it is not helpful and neither of you need to resort to such childish acts to get your point across. so climb off your high horse and lets discuss matters like civilized individuals.
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