New EU directive pushes toward replaceable iPhone batteries

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 155
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,390member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post


    This legislation is sponsored by... Nokia.



    Nokia reminds all Europeans that a happy Nokia makes for a happy EU.



    What a tool, this has nothing to do with Apple versus other manufactures, it is all to do with the EU recycling programmes
  • Reply 42 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post


    I am not worried about this even if it passes. By the time they finalize this proposal batteries will be more efficient and smaller. I am sure Apple engineers will come up with something innovative.



    I doubt it. Why would Apple engineers come up with something when to date no one else has? Apple does not make batteries. They buy them just like everyone else.



    By this continued "Apple" is the inventor of all things wonderful, you would assume that we all sit and wait for manna to drop from Culpertino.
  • Reply 43 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Booga View Post


    This legislation isn't very forward-looking. Any power source with an energy density like some of the new batteries are planned to have is going to be dangerous for unqualified people to handle when removed from the device...



    WHAT!!!!!!!!!! Is it an nuclear powered battery or just maybe lithium ion, or maybe air zinc or some other combination? Are you saying that something as simple as opening the back and taking out the battery will require a degree?
  • Reply 44 of 155
    I can't believe some of the reactions I read here, it's pretty sad to be honest.

    The EU is trying to do some good for our planet by giving the industry some simple and really not so difficult rules. As you can read in the article they have done this before and with good result. The industry is forced to find new solutions and by doing this they might even improve quality.

    Apple is proudly presenting itself as a 'green' company, which is a great development. Some people acually care for the enviroment and it even sells!

    And for the people that are so scared of removable batteries in their iPod or iPhone... don't be, it's Apple, they will find a beautifull solution for the 'problem' and you might even be happy with this new feature. (the tiny Apple remote is perhaps a good example)
  • Reply 45 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by w00master View Post


    Imho, I'm hoping the EU passes this. I know I'm among the minority here, but imho there's no good reason why Apple has never had replaceable batteries for the iPods and iPhones. iPhone & iPods should have had replaceable batteries A LONG D*MN TIME AGO.



    Disagree with me all you want folks, but come back to me a year after this happens and then tell me if this was a good or bad thing.



    There's simply no excuse for Apple on this one. Flame away folks.





    No flames here. Trust me if this was directed against M$, or Nokia, or Motorola, or some other non-Apple product, the Appleistas here would be cheering and lining up to witch hunt.
  • Reply 46 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monkeystation View Post


    I can't believe some of the reactions I read here, it's pretty sad to be honest.

    The EU is trying to do some good for our planet by giving the industry some simple and really not so difficult rules. As you can read in the article they have done this before and with good result. The industry is forced to find new solutions and by doing this they might even improve quality.

    Apple is proudly presenting itself as a 'green' company, which is a great development. Some people acually care for the enviroment and it even sells!

    And for the people that are so scared of removable batteries in their iPod or iPhone... don't be, it's Apple, they will find a beautifull solution for the 'problem' and you might even be happy with this new feature. (the tiny Apple remote is perhaps a good example)



    Don't waste you time on commen sense with this crowd.
  • Reply 47 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post


    This legislation is sponsored by... Nokia.



    Nokia reminds all Europeans that a happy Nokia makes for a happy EU.



    Your dumb post was sponsored by Apple.
  • Reply 48 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by samab View Post


    No, I am just saying that it's a design choice.



    Remember how PC world said that iphone's battery life is on the top end in their battery tests.



    http://www.pcworld.com/article/14834...ts_rivals.html



    What they don't tell you is that most of the other phones have a much smaller battery.



    It's a designer's choice --- apple got stuck with very lousy battery life, so they had to incorporate a much larger battery than its competitors.



    The same thing happened when Nokia came out with the original N95. It was underpowered. Nokia fixed it, and did a software upgrade.
  • Reply 49 of 155
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by genericposts View Post


    The same thing happened when Nokia came out with the original N95. It was underpowered. Nokia fixed it, and did a software upgrade.



    Your dumb post was sponsored by Nokia.
  • Reply 50 of 155
    but we should collect and send to factory for recycling.
  • Reply 51 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by vagvoba View Post


    You totally misunderstand the issue. It's not about the iPhone or the removable battery. The problem is that the EU should stay out of this very healthy competitive market and let the market/consumers decide what they want. The EU tries to over-regulate the free market by making non-sense rules.



    I think you misunderstand. It's not about the free market, but about environmental protection, and all those millions of batteries are a dangerous problem. Many people here (in Europe) prefer regulations and state (or even better EU) control in order to protect their environment. What would be the alternative? Being at the mercy of some CEO whose only legitimate goal is to make money?



    You can't honestly believe (after what's happening to Wallstreet right now) that the free market would take anything into consideration but the highest short term profit.
  • Reply 52 of 155
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    How annoying. I have never had to replace a phone battery. And i like the way the iphone feels solid, with no easily broken hatch like other phones



    Just what phones have you been buying where the latch or shell breaks that easily? I have never had a latch broken in 10+ years of using almost as many individual Nokia and Sony Ericsson phones. I haven't heard of a latch breaking on any friend's phone. Some of these phones are from the very bottom of the price range (think £20). And I treat phones far from gently.
  • Reply 53 of 155
    It better be alright for Apple to run a recycling program, instead of redesigning the iPod / iPhone. I personally hate removable batteries. I've never had the need for them, and it's one of the things I appreciate about Apple's consumer products.
  • Reply 54 of 155
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by k2director View Post


    I would truly like to put my foot up the EU's ass if it tries to force Apple to include a removable battery in the iPod and iPhone.



    It's one thing to introduce laws that protect the physical well-being of the public (ie, limiting harmful materials). It's another to start dictating product design to companies that know their customer base and their business far better than any EU paper-pusher ever could.



    Did you actually read the article? It's about protecting the environment, not protecting individual consumers. Do you think that protecting the environment is a bad thing? Or is the shiny box of wires in your pocket more important to you?



    Actually, this is far from the most extreme case of government interference in phone design. Korea mandates a common charger socket, for example. Again, it's for environmental reasons as it stops redundant (but perfectly functional) chargers from being thrown away.
  • Reply 55 of 155
    monstrositymonstrosity Posts: 2,204member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bishop of Southwark View Post


    That is an urban myth and totally untrue.



    That is NOT an urban myth.



    The urban myth is that it is an urban myth!



    From COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No 2257/94...

    This is as someone else put it ""The regulation that Eurofanatics always deny exists"" which includes the lines...



    "free from malformation or abnormal curvature of the fingers"

    "defects of shape"

    http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/...4R2257:EN:HTML





    An embarrassed EU have been trying to portray this as an urban myth down the usual pro EU channels such as the BBC. They have done this by saying they did not ban "bendy bananas"... sure they never said in so many words "bendy bananas" but what is bendy if it is not "abnormal curvature of the fingers" or "defects of shape"??!!



    Lets not stop with bananas, how about cucumbers...

    EU?s over-regulation. European Commission Regulation No. 1277/88 states...

    "if a cucumber bends more than 10 millimeters per 10 centimeters (0.4 inches per 4 inches) in length"



    Notice now the use of the word "bend"!



    If it is an urban myth, how come the EU dropped much of their (ridiculous) legislation only this year?



    25% of the surface of an apple has to be red, carrots too wide, the regulations were never ending, and were certainly NOT a myth!
  • Reply 56 of 155
    palegolaspalegolas Posts: 1,281member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    ...electrical equipment must be designed to allow that batteries be 'readily removed' for replacement or removal at the end of product's life.



    Even though I'm sure Apple could design an excellent hot swappable battery design for their iPhones without compromising the solid and compact design, this just means there must be simple guidelines of how to remove and replace the battery. Perhaps Apple could offer this service for free in the case of the consumer buying a new battery, or the consumer decides to recycle the product.



    This deal is first for the environment, and secondly for the consumer.
  • Reply 57 of 155
    wheelhotwheelhot Posts: 465member
    Quote:

    First, it's not what consumers want. People may think consumers want it, but they don't, and that's why Apple doesn't do it. We'd all like to be able to easily replace the battery in the iPhone, but not when we see what it does to the size and build quality. Keep in mind for the battery to be user replaceable, there needs to be significant casing around the battery and where the battery connects to the iPhone. Doing this in a way that still provides a solid feel would not be possible without significantly increasing size or reducing capacity. The MacBook Air is even worse as the battery is a diaphragm within the case.



    True, heck we would be furious if suddenly the iPhone gets thicker just to accommodate removable batteries (and maybe storage).



    Quote:

    It better be alright for Apple to run a recycling program, instead of redesigning the iPod / iPhone. I personally hate removable batteries. I've never had the need for them, and it's one of the things I appreciate about Apple's consumer products.



    Same to me, some people say the iPod dont have replaceable batteries, I say, So What! by the time the battery dies of, you yourself would want a new iPod or something else.
  • Reply 58 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    Your dumb post was sponsored by Nokia.



    Wow. How original. Came up with that all by yourself did cha?
  • Reply 59 of 155
    monstrositymonstrosity Posts: 2,204member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monkeystation View Post


    I can't believe some of the reactions I read here, it's pretty sad to be honest.

    The EU is trying to do some good for our planet by giving the industry some simple and really not so difficult rules. As you can read in the article they have done this before and with good result. The industry is forced to find new solutions and by doing this they might even improve quality.

    Apple is proudly presenting itself as a 'green' company, which is a great development. Some people acually care for the enviroment and it even sells!

    And for the people that are so scared of removable batteries in their iPod or iPhone... don't be, it's Apple, they will find a beautifull solution for the 'problem' and you might even be happy with this new feature. (the tiny Apple remote is perhaps a good example)



    Problem is , what we find quite often with the EU is that their regulation often causes more harm than good to the very cause these regulations portray to be supporting.

    I'm not saying that is definitely the case in this particular piece of legislation as I dont have the time to research it, but just because something masquerades as 'green' or 'environmentally friendly' in reality does not always mean it is so.

    Being 'green' is big business, and subject to the same exaggerated truths as any other industry.
  • Reply 60 of 155
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macslut View Post


    First, it's not what consumers want. People may think consumers want it, but they don't, and that's why Apple doesn't do it.



    Have you got anything to back this claim up?



    As the vast majority of mobile phone sold this past year has a user replaceable battery how can you possibly claim that it is not a feature that consumers want?
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