LG holds iMac-suitable touchscreen; new iTunes plus hints

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by webhead View Post


    Doesn't the lack of DRM on the iTunes plus tracks (hopefull all iTunes music soon) mean music purchased on iTunes will work on all your devices as well?



    A) iTunes Plus is only available on EMI and independent label music.

    B) ACCs are used instead of MP3s. ACC is supported by the iPod and Zune, but pretty sporadic after that.
  • Reply 22 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post


    A) iTunes Plus is only available on EMI and independent label music.

    B) ACCs are used instead of MP3s. ACC is supported by the iPod and Zune, but pretty sporadic after that.



    I just finished upgrading the Corpse Bride soundtrack to +.

    From the Warner catalogue.



    M
  • Reply 23 of 46
    jimzipjimzip Posts: 446member
    Aw, I would love an all iTunes Plus catalogue so much...



    I agree with the touchscreen iMac comments though, it would have to be done *very* well, and though I trust Apple - if anyone - would do it, I don't know whether it's the best advancement. I'd prefer a touchscreen keyboard actually, that way it could change depending on context, and could double as a trackpad... Potentially reducing the need for a mouse if it got good enough I suppose.



    Jimzip
  • Reply 24 of 46
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,709member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jimzip View Post


    Aw, I would love an all iTunes Plus catalogue so much...



    I agree with the touchscreen iMac comments though, it would have to be done *very* well, and though I trust Apple - if anyone - would do it, I don't know whether it's the best advancement. I'd prefer a touchscreen keyboard actually, that way it could change depending on context, and could double as a trackpad... Potentially reducing the need for a mouse if it got good enough I suppose.



    Jimzip



    What I want is a thin, small format, wifi, touch screen, iTunes client for my living room.
  • Reply 25 of 46
    bwikbwik Posts: 564member
    Confirmed! Neil Young's "Everybody knows this is nowhere" showed up for me on the big list over the weekend. It is gone now. It certainly was an indication of AAC+ existing on their servers. Can't wait!!
  • Reply 26 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post


    A) iTunes Plus is only available on EMI and independent label music.



    I think that's why he said, albeit in parenthesis "(hopefully all iTunes music soon)."



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post


    B) ACCs are used instead of MP3s. ACC is supported by the iPod and Zune, but pretty sporadic after that.



    Hmm, guess it depends what you mean by "pretty sporadic." Here's a list from wikipedia of PMPs capable of AAC playback:



    Creative Zen Portable

    SanDisk Sansa

    Sony PlayStation Portable (PSP) with firmware 2.0 or greater

    Sony Walkman

    SonyEricsson Walkman Phones-W series, e.g. W890i

    Nintendo DSi To be released in America mid-2009

    Nintendo Wii

    Slacker G2 Personal Radio Player



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advance...oding#Hardware



    I'm sure there are more than that and of course, it's nothing to convert unprotected AACs to MP3s. In addition, it's nearly as easy to remove FairPlay DRM by burning a CD of the protected tracks and then re-importing them back into iTunes; I think you can burn them to DVD and get the same effect as well.
  • Reply 27 of 46
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,500member
    Every major display manufacturer in the world has multitouch now. It's not news. Trouble is, every attempted mass-market application they can show for it can be achieved better with a remote control or other input device. Who wants to have to walk up and use their hands to manipulate pictures on a screen when they can sit on their couch and do the same thing?



    Multitouch only makes sense in certain applications and certain settings. Right now there is no compelling mass-market use for it.
  • Reply 28 of 46
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    During a question and answer session last year, Apple chief executive Steve Jobs noted that multi-touch technology is nicely suited for the iPhone but said he was "not sure it makes sense" on the Mac.



    There will be no video iPod. Nobody wants to watch video on an iPod.



    Apple will not make a mobile phone.



    From CNNMoney.com, "The trouble with Steve Jobs":



    Quote:

    Often Jobs would suddenly "flip," taking an idea that he'd mocked (maybe your idea) and embracing it passionately - and as his own - without ever acknowledging that his view had changed. "He has this ability to change his mind and completely forget his old opinion about something," says a former close colleague who asked not to be named. "It's weird. He can say, 'I love white; white is the best.' And then three months later say, 'Black is the best; white is not the best.' He doesn't live with his mistake. It evaporates."



  • Reply 29 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by auxio View Post


    Every major display manufacturer in the world has multitouch now. It's not news. Trouble is, every attempted mass-market application they can show for it can be achieved better with a remote control or other input device. Who wants to have to walk up and use their hands to manipulate pictures on a screen when they can sit on their couch and do the same thing?



    Multitouch only makes sense in certain applications and certain settings. Right now there is no compelling mass-market use for it.



    I would hesitate to say "no," because there could be some. A mouse pointer has only 1 tip, but some applications might make good use of two digits, although I do tend to agree with you.



    A new keyboard wit ha multi-touch glass track-pad on it would be nice, though could potentially make the key board too large.
  • Reply 30 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by auxio View Post


    Every major display manufacturer in the world has multitouch now. It's not news. Trouble is, every attempted mass-market application they can show for it can be achieved better with a remote control or other input device. Who wants to have to walk up and use their hands to manipulate pictures on a screen when they can sit on their couch and do the same thing?



    Multitouch only makes sense in certain applications and certain settings. Right now there is no compelling mass-market use for it.



    I tried out a multi touch HP the other day at a office box store and I found it rather different but I would not spend the dollars as it would not work in my office. I have a wireless keyboard and mouse so I can get away from sitting to close to the screen and type with the keyboard in my lap. I think that Steve Jobs was right in the fact that multi touch is a interesting device for small things like the iPod and iPhone but it will not be the next great thing for a desktop, I know I would not buy one.
  • Reply 31 of 46
    expatexpat Posts: 110member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post


    I would hesitate to say "no," because there could be some. A mouse pointer has only 1 tip, but some applications might make good use of two digits, although I do tend to agree with you.



    As we all know, Apple has multi-digit trackpads, and I think this is the way to go. I have to agree when it was said earlier, though, that there isn't anything you could do on a touch monitor that you couldn't do better with a more typical means if control (mouse, trackpad)



    On top of that, I cant think of any applications that would benefit from it. Photoshop maybe, but that is better with a stylus, not your fingers. Maybe programs for the elderly or children, but that's all. I know plenty of people dream of "minority report" computers, but when I think of touch all I think of is a crappy toshiba tablet I used to have at work (which was worthless) and that microsoft surface that only seems to be useful if all you use a computer for is resizing pictures with two fingers and then shuffling them about.
  • Reply 32 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by auxio View Post


    Every major display manufacturer in the world has multitouch now. It's not news. Trouble is, every attempted mass-market application they can show for it can be achieved better with a remote control or other input device. Who wants to have to walk up and use their hands to manipulate pictures on a screen when they can sit on their couch and do the same thing?



    Multitouch only makes sense in certain applications and certain settings. Right now there is no compelling mass-market use for it.



    Exactly, though the iPhone/iPod touch and Apple's MultiTouch trackpad-sporting laptops obviously represent the correct "applications and settings." I also don't understand why some keep propagating the idea of a touch screen keyboard for Apple's desktop computers! While the iPhone's touch screen keyboard works better than those cramped, physical keyboards found on most smart phones, a full-size, touch screen keyboard would simply be no match for a physical one. Tapping on an expensive, giant piece of glass with no feedback is not most people's idea of fun.



    What might make more sense is Apple allowing people's iPhones and iPod touches to serve as external, MultiTouch, motion sensitive trackpads, allowing you to use the gestures Apple's already programed with the added bonus of visual feedback. You could pull things on the main display down into the iPhone's, for doodling on pictures and setting up directions using Google Maps (yes, like DED's proposed idea).
  • Reply 33 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wobegon View Post


    Exactly, though the iPhone/iPod touch and Apple's MultiTouch trackpad-sporting laptops obviously represent the correct "applications and settings." I also don't understand why some keep propagating the idea of a touch screen keyboard for Apple's desktop computers! While the iPhone's touch screen keyboard works better than those cramped, physical keyboards found on most smart phones, a full-size, touch screen keyboard would simply be no match for a physical one. Tapping on an expensive, giant piece of glass with no feedback is not most people's idea of fun.



    What might make more sense is Apple allowing people's iPhones and iPod touches to serve as external, MultiTouch, motion sensitive trackpads, allowing you to use the gestures Apple's already programed with the added bonus of visual feedback. You could pull things on the main display down into the iPhone's, for doodling on pictures and setting up directions using Google Maps (yes, like DED's proposed idea).



    I imagine those complaints could be addressed though. Haptic technology for physical feedback and some kind of aural feedback system based on the area you strike (a different click sound for a different zone you strike?).

    I imagine you could tie a few different ideas like this in a tidy Apple-esque package. You could learn to flow between the different input methods in a very fluid fashion with intuitive sensors, feedback and gestures.
  • Reply 34 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dazabrit View Post


    I imagine those complaints could be addressed though. Haptic technology for physical feedback and some kind of aural feedback system based on the area you strike (a different click sound for a different zone you strike?).

    I imagine you could tie a few different ideas like this in a tidy Apple-esque package. You could learn to flow between the different input methods in a very fluid fashion with intuitive sensors, feedback and gestures.



    While they might be addressable, I don't think any amount of sensors (what kind?) or aural feedback (which sounds terrible, pardon the pun) will make a full-size, touch screen keyboard a better text input device than a physical, tactile keyboard. It works for the iPhone/iPod touch because 1) you're actually looking at the keyboard while your typing and 2) those tiny physical keyboards on most smart phones don't learn your mistake patterns (which the iPhone's virtual keyboard does), not to mention they're uncomfortable. Then you weigh in the cost of a full-size touch screen keyboard and it makes almost no sense at all.
  • Reply 35 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wobegon View Post


    While they might be addressable, I don't think any amount of sensors (what kind?) or aural feedback (which sounds terrible, pardon the pun) will make a full-size, touch screen keyboard a better text input device than a physical, tactile keyboard. It works for the iPhone/iPod touch because 1) you're actually looking at the keyboard while your typing and 2) those tiny physical keyboards on most smart phones don't learn your mistake patterns (which the iPhone's virtual keyboard does), not to mention they're uncomfortable. Then you weigh in the cost of a full-size touch screen keyboard and it makes almost no sense at all.



    I imagine the audio feedback could be practically unnoticeable. It would output the same kind of clicking sound as the keyboard but alter 'VERY' slightly based on which zone your fingers strike

    so your subconcious makes sense of where your fingers are.



    I guess sensors is the wrong word too really. I mean intelligent software features like the auto correction on the iPhone. Apples previously filed patents show a gesture recognition system that

    allows you to sketch by clasping your fingers as if holding a pen, same approach for typing etc...



    I can imagine something like this being very attractive to a lot of users because it gives you the same kind of chameleon input device that changes based upon the active application. The cost is definitely prohibitive though
  • Reply 36 of 46
    takeotakeo Posts: 440member
    I hope the iMac Touch comes with a 1 liter bottle of windex... in a Jonathan Ive designed bottle of course.
  • Reply 37 of 46
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Takeo View Post


    I hope the iMac Touch comes with a 1 liter bottle of windex... in a Jonathan Ive designed bottle of course.



    you keep the windex as far away from my 30" and my 23" and my 20" cinema displays as possible. bad enough somebody touched my mac book pro screen again yesterday and i had to bite my tongue... not good to freak out on paying clients...
  • Reply 38 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dazabrit View Post


    I imagine the audio feedback could be practically unnoticeable. It would output the same kind of clicking sound as the keyboard but alter 'VERY' slightly based on which zone your fingers strike

    so your subconcious makes sense of where your fingers are.



    While I don't think that'd help much, I did make the mistake of thinking it would be aurally irritating because...a physical keyboard makes sounds too.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dazabrit View Post


    I guess sensors is the wrong word too really. I mean intelligent software features like the auto correction on the iPhone. Apples previously filed patents show a gesture recognition system that

    allows you to sketch by clasping your fingers as if holding a pen, same approach for typing etc...



    How would you apply gesture recognition to typing? Now perhaps they could apply what the mistake-pattern-learning (don't know what the official name is) system the iPhone uses, that would help. However, this still doesn't solve the problem of having to look down at the non-tactile keyboard to type! There have already been inexpensive systems that project a virtual keyboard onto any surface, say, a table top, and they never took off. The iPhone's virtual keyboard works because you're looking at it (or just barely above it at the text field) as you type (and again, the alternative - a micro chiclet keyboard - is not as good).



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dazabrit View Post


    I can imagine something like this being very attractive to a lot of users because it gives you the same kind of chameleon input device that changes based upon the active application. The cost is definitely prohibitive though



    I can understand the draw of a dynamic input device, but when you tell people that input device is also their keyboard, I think the resounding response would be "huh?" Apple doesn't really make "huh?" products, they make "oh! really!? WOW!" products. A separate dynamic input device, especially one that serves as a standalone device like an iPhone or iPod touch, is far more understandable for people to, say, hook up to their computer, enabling MultiTouch manipulation, without losing the physical keyboard that can be typed on without even thinking about it.



    You also have to consider that, if your keyboard were touch sensitive, you'd have to hover your hands over it at all times or put them to the sides to avoid inputing text, unlike a physical keyboard that serves as a resting place for your finger tips. Requiring the user to turn on and off their keyboard via a software or hardware switch to avoid text input when resting their fingers on the touch screen would also be both a hindrance and simply an odd idea for users, new and old, to grasp.
  • Reply 39 of 46
    Yeah, I would prefer a full multi-touch keyboard which means that the key can be changed to different layout so that people who uses different language to type can just change their keyboard layout to the language they are often too. But of course the problem of tactile feedback must first be fixed for that to happen.



    I don't see people will often use a touch display which requires them to lift up their hand from their keyboard and mouse just to touch the screen and drag a picture.
  • Reply 40 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Takeo View Post


    I hope the iMac Touch comes with a 1 liter bottle of windex... in a Jonathan Ive designed bottle of course.



    Yeah, but they designed the bottle to be so thin that it can't hold that much windex.
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