Apple forces bathroom escorts on WWDC reporters

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 65
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    From what I understand, tech journalists are asked to sign NDAs all the time. That would be much more appropriate.



    Different NDA, if any.



    The press were invited in to hear the keynote and as pointed out by the blogger, the security issue concerned any attempt to get more information outside the restricted area to which they were originally assigned.



    Asking a reporter to sign an NDA? You have to be kidding. Just what would they be restricted to, how much time would it cover and how in the world could you control what they wrote about or claimed was not covered in the agreement?



    And think about it. It would be like Bush getting the press to sign NDAs and then disclose everything about the war to them. Great way to stifle the press if it worked.
  • Reply 42 of 65
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    From what I understand, tech journalists are asked to sign NDAs all the time. That would be much more appropriate.



    Different NDA, if any.



    The press were invited in to hear the keynote and as pointed out by the blogger, the security issue concerned any attempt to get more information outside the restricted area to which they were originally assigned.



    Asking a reporter to sign an NDA? You have to be kidding. Just what would they be restricted to, how much time would it cover and how in the world could you control what they wrote about or claimed was not covered in the agreement?



    And think about it. It would be like, Bush getting the press to sign NDAs and then disclose everything about the war to them. Great way to stifle the press if it worked. And for a reporter to be out of work.
  • Reply 43 of 65
    Has anyone considered the obvious? The escorts were probably not there to monitor what goes on in the bathroom but to make sure reporters don't go someplace other than the bathroom.



    WWDC has a lot of closed sessions with confidential information, and Apple wouldn't want reporters wandering into them.



    As for asking reporters to sign NDAs, reporters have already been writing about background processes and other details of the iPhone SDK that are covered by NDA. Some people couldn't break that NDA fast enough. An NDA doesn't prevent people from leaking, it just gives the company the right to sue people who leak, and suing the press is seldom cost-effective.



    If Hamblem really thinks it's "demoralizing and embarrassing" for Apple employees to know how often he goes to the bathroom, then he should have stayed home and not covered WWDC. If he couldn't find anything more important to write about than bathrooms, he wouldn't have been missing much, anyway. And, if the fact that Hamblem goes to the bathroom is so embarrassing, why did he told the whole world about his embarrassing secret?
  • Reply 44 of 65
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    Different NDA, if any.



    The press were invited in to hear the keynote and as pointed out by the blogger, the security issue concerned any attempt to get more information outside the restricted area to which they were originally assigned.



    Asking a reporter to sign an NDA? You have to be kidding. Just what would they be restricted to, how much time would it cover and how in the world could you control what they wrote about or claimed was not covered in the agreement?



    Sorry, I don't know the specifics, but it might be a different NDA. I don't think the questions you raise are show-stoppers, it would just need to lay out the details.



    If they broke the NDA and somehow they got a grey area or loophole, I don't know if that matters so much in terms of that person in the long term. Do you think Apple would ever invite them back for another press event?
  • Reply 45 of 65
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Sorry, I don't know the specifics, but it might be a different NDA. I don't think the questions you raise are show-stoppers, it would just need to lay out the details.



    If they broke the NDA and somehow they got a grey area or loophole, I don't know if that matters so much in terms of that person in the long term. Do you think Apple would ever invite them back for another press event?



    I don't think that Apple would invite them back or the attending developers would want them back. I certainly wouldn't.



    Lets simplify this. You, a tech writer, are invited to the keynote. Part of that invitation, should you so happen to accept, requires that you sit in a restricted area, abide by the conditions set forth and report on anything that you hear or see while encumbered. Unless personally invited by an official/organizer so permitted to do so, you are not allowed any other entitlements.



    As such, there is no need for your signature on an NDA. If by chance you do become knowledgeable of any other news outside of the keynote presentation whether you became apprised of such by happen chance or due to your reporting prowess, you would then be free to do whatever you wish to with it. A situation of which any reporter would certainly take advantage.



    However, sneaking into the conference (remember that a lot of people paid big monies to be there) could be deemed a criminal act as well as purposely breaking an NDA. Using such a strategy besides being costly, in time, possibly monies and credibility. could be a career killer.



    The main thing here, was that a reporter blogged in fun and then put the situation in the proper perspective. Unfortunately, an editor of another publication, for whatever reason, decided to forgo the rules of good journalism and by omission, turned a rather innocuous situation into a national debate.



    No wonder that the media, along with politicians and lawyers, gets so lowly scored when it comes to public surveys on 'What profession do you trust the most?"
  • Reply 46 of 65
    dj rizzodj rizzo Posts: 18member
    LOL love the quotes on hand-washing. Hope the escorts made them do it. This story has me picturing Steve Jobs sitting in his office watching everything on camera a la Mr. Burns.



    This is another sad case of lots of people getting inconvenienced because a few a-holes ruined things. It's the same thing as airport screening - the vast majority of us just want to get to where we're going but because of the actions of some uber-a-holes we have to get there 2-4 hours early and take off our shoes.



    But who's watching the escorts? They can just as easily report on the goings on at WWDC as anyone.
  • Reply 47 of 65
    rot'napplerot'napple Posts: 1,839member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    I don't think so. As I understand it, Intel Developer Forum and similar conferences require an NDA for press entry. The same goes for any piece of hardware or software that's tested, benchmarked or reviewed. The NDA applies until a certain date that the company allows stories to be printed or posted. If you want early access, you get the NDA, otherwise, you get access on release day, meaning you're a week behind.



    There are some that refuse to sign NDAs, but I haven't heard of any complaining about it.



    How humorous and what an oxymoron if ever there was one, "require an NDA for press entry". Is that all it takes, an NDA to stifle the press and disregard the first amendment, sunshine laws, Freedom of Information Act? Maybe the federal government should require an NDA of the press about Guitmo Detainees and the Patriot Act if that's all it takes to squelch the press and not have the lefty loom numb-nuts not complain about violation of people's rights?!



    Does Al Gore know about these NDAs the 'tech press' must sign? Where is Al Gore when you need him? I can hear him now... in a loud and raucous, screaming voice, Al says... "STEVE JOBS BETRAYED HIS COMPANY! HE PLAYED ON HIS PARANOIA. HE TOOK THE "TECH PRESS" ON AN ILL-CONCEIVED PISS BREAK, AN EVERYDAY OCCURRENCE PREORDAINED AND PLANNED BEORE THE WWDC 08 EVER TOOK PLACE."



    Yep, how humorous!
  • Reply 48 of 65
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,319member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post


    Since we are on the subject of bathrooms, was that pun intentional?







    No, but a good idea.
  • Reply 49 of 65
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Monkeyoe View Post


    Absolute power corrupts absolutely.



    I love that quote Can't remember who it was by though



    Lord Acton.



    I've noticed that over the years, as I've changed jobs, the procedure for drug tests has been getting more and more invasive. From measuring your pee's temperature to not letting you flush after you are done, I'm surmising that next time I change jobs someone is going to hold my dick.
  • Reply 50 of 65
    wnursewnurse Posts: 427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blursd View Post


    And notice how no one even makes an issue of the fact this reporter PUT UP with the repeated treatment. If he were really so mistreated and offended why didn't he just leave ...? Oh wait, its because he wanted to see the iPhone. So I guess its okay to whore out your morals as long as you get something you want in the end - then when you get what you want you can complain about how you voluntarily placed yourself into a situation where you were supposedly mistreated.



    Remember ... you're only getting half the story here.



    If all the reporters had left, we would have heard about the biases in the media, blah blah blah.

    Yeah, so because no one left, apple was right to treat the reporters that way.

    I guess cause all citizens have not left the united states, means it's ok for bush administration to listen in to our phone calls without warrant. Heck, the bush admin should just start executing people they don't like until all citizens emigrate (after all, if people stay, must mean the administration is right to do whatever they want).



    The educational standards of this country has certainly been lowered.



    I mean, i guess since i want to talk to my father who is on currently in a foreign country and I have to use a phone to call him, i certainly whore'd out myself to get what i wanted (ie, to wish him happy father day) so i should shut up and be happy that Bush is listening in to my conversation without any just cause or warrant,

    right??..



    I think educational institutions across this country should make it mandatory for everyone to take a class in civics and logic.
  • Reply 51 of 65
    wnursewnurse Posts: 427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sky King View Post


    I find it fascinating that so many people are interested in protecting the representatives of the media. Perhaps if the members of the media/press, or whatever you choose to call them, learned to act both responsibly and honestly (to report and not spin the information they sell) one get more excited about the way they are treated. Unfortunately, members of the media, just like members of the judiciary, have taken their constitutionally guaranteed rights and prostituted them. Remember that the Founding Fathers warned of this i(both the media and the judiciary assuming too much power) in the Federalist Papers shortly after our Constitution was written.



    Note to the media: If you don't like being treated like out of control children, then stop acting like out of control children.



    You are joking right?.
  • Reply 52 of 65
    8corewhore8corewhore Posts: 833member
    "Well, he is a reporter after all. I trust my drug dealer more than bloggers and reporters. At least my drug dealer has some integrity. "



    Limbaugh is that you?



    Maybe they got wind Senator Craig was in the house.
  • Reply 53 of 65
    Why didn't Apple just post employees in the bathrooms as monitors instead of making people ask?



    Apple could then have posted a sign on the bathrooms explaining that Apple security employees were present in to monitor against press leaks.



    That way, journalists could have used the bathroom whenever their bladders called for it instead of having to "ask permission" like this is grade school!
  • Reply 54 of 65
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,248member
    I would have asked my attendant to hold my willy and make chit chat while I stood there at the urinal. You can't pay for that kind of customer service these days
  • Reply 55 of 65
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spunkybart View Post


    Apple could then have posted a sign on the bathrooms explaining that Apple security employees were present in to monitor against press leaks.



    That way, journalists could have used the bathroom whenever their bladders called for it instead of having to "ask permission" like this is grade school!



    Yes, and you can just post a sign on your front door. Then, anyone who wants to can walk into your house and use the bathroom.



    Get real. How many companies allow non-employees wander around their corporate facilities without escorts? (And yes, during WWDC, the Moscone Center is an Apple corporate facility.)



    Why don't you walk into the offices of Computerworld and ask Mr. Hamblen if it's okay for you to wander around unescorted. See what he says.
  • Reply 56 of 65
    olternautolternaut Posts: 1,376member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post


    Apple seem to hide some information about the upcoming iPhone. Why they did not show allow anyone to photograph it? what about showing the unit the journalists after the keynotes and let them photograph it?! Furthermore, Apple 3G iPhone FCC filing indicate that Apple requested that photos, specs, and users manual to be withheld from the public for 45 days (thats until July 15th) because of unannounced specs!!!



    I'm not being pessimistic or sarcastic in any way when I ask this but...

    What would be the benefit to apple of announcing at the last second before they go on sale any new features of the iphone 3G??
  • Reply 57 of 65
    felix01felix01 Posts: 258member
    If this minor inconvenience bothered this reporter, it's a good thing he doesn't work for my company where the lower-level employees are subjected to frequent random drug tests. And they don't send you in a bathroom stall where you can fill a cup with urine in private and turn it in to the monitor; rather, you do it in plain view.



    Women too.



    Reason...shenanigans in the past where samples were switched when allowed to do the deed in private. The old "one bad apple ruins the barrel."



    And I suspect some reporter in the past has tried to pull a fast one.



    Thus, the present "escort" procedures.



    Get over it pal.
  • Reply 58 of 65
    wnursewnurse Posts: 427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lonestar1 View Post


    Yes, and you can just post a sign on your front door. Then, anyone who wants to can walk into your house and use the bathroom.



    Get real. How many companies allow non-employees wander around their corporate facilities without escorts? (And yes, during WWDC, the Moscone Center is an Apple corporate facility.)



    Why don't you walk into the offices of Computerworld and ask Mr. Hamblen if it's okay for you to wander around unescorted. See what he says.



    Actually, i have been to other companies... while i wasn't allowed to wander around unescorted, i was allowed to go to the bathroom by myself. And the companies i went to were defense contractors, engaged in work far more secret than anything apple has ever done.
  • Reply 59 of 65
    wnursewnurse Posts: 427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dunks View Post


    I would have asked my attendant to hold my willy and make chit chat while I stood there at the urinal. You can't pay for that kind of customer service these days



    I would have too.. you want to escort me into the bathroom, then come hold my dick, Dick.
  • Reply 60 of 65
    olternautolternaut Posts: 1,376member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Olternaut View Post


    I'm not being pessimistic or sarcastic in any way when I ask this but...

    What would be the benefit to apple of announcing at the last second before they go on sale any new features of the iphone 3G??



    Anyone?
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