First iPad estimates: 4 million units in year one, 8 million in 2011

1246

Comments

  • Reply 61 of 110
    bdkennedy1bdkennedy1 Posts: 1,459member
    I don't know about that. Out of the dozen people I talked to today about the iPad, I was the only one that thought it was great and saw the potential. The general consensus was that it was "stupid" or "ugly".
  • Reply 62 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Again, this just shows your ignorance. Apparently you missed the memo about Apple's recycling program for computers they sold you (regardless of whether you replaced it with a new Mac or not). Here, if interested, check this out: http://www.apple.com/recycling/computer/



    Add: And, since you seem very concerned about this, let me ask you: Did you recycle your used computers, sorry, 'toys'? Perhaps you can give us some guidance on what we should do with ours if you think Apple's program is bogus. Unless, of course, your consumption habits and views on the environmental consequences of electronics are entirely consistent, and you don't use any electronics - do you consume electronics 'toys?'



    Yeah you got me. I'm on my 5th iphone. I threw the other 4 in some lake some where. Now you need to simmer yourself down and have some Flavor-aid.
  • Reply 63 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Father View Post


    Yeah you got me. I'm on my 5th iphone. I threw the other 4 in some lake some where. Now you need to simmer yourself down and have some Flavor-aid.



    I am very simmered-down, thanks.



    I have a slight issue with 'talk-is-cheap' kind of posts.
  • Reply 64 of 110
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steviet02 View Post


    I would like it to multi task. They are saying that this is/should replace a laptop yet I can't talk on skype, read my email, and surf the web. Strange, don't you think?



    A built in camera would have been nice to start with. I think I saw that they have an add on that plugs into the 30 pin connector, but thats just another item to carry around, blah......



    I have a couple other gripes, the bezel is very large. I realize that you need a bezel to hold the device but it seems very large to me.







    ***** Edit



    I meant netbook, not laptop....



    I think you and others are just looking at what it doesn't have instead of what it has. Quite honestly, your missing feature list appears rather underwhelming as well. Multitasking is a mere software update away, I was hoping for it too, but it isn't a make or break item for me at all especially since Apples apps can run in the background. I don't get the built in camera at all, maybe a webcam, but holding this device like a camera would look odd to say the least.



    I see this as a great device with massive room for third parties to come in and make some really good apps that you would never dream of on a smaller, less powerful device. The biggest thing I wanted was an internet tablet for lounging on the couch as... laptops are awkward, so it works fine for me.



    Edit: A 128 GB version would be nice though.
  • Reply 65 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mark2005 View Post


    What's missing that you wanted in a netbook?



    For me, the only thing missing is Microsoft Office, and not because I want it, but because PC people want files in those formats, and iWork still has issues when translated. Who knows? Maybe MS will write a version of Office for the iPad By the way, Apple just set the mid-tier pricing bar for iPad apps by pricing each iWork app at $9.99.



    The other thing could be a physical keyboard. but for me, netbook keyboards usually suck, and I have an iPhone, so I'm already pretty good at typing on a virtual keyboard.



    Why an iPad? It's much easier to whip out and quicker to start up than a netbook; think about using a netbook in a car or carrying it around to meetings at work. It's 50% lighter (or more). Its battery lasts much longer. It won't be bogged down by malware or anti-malware, and won't need to be updated constantly for security reasons. It looks easier to use as touch will work better than a trackpad or nub. Buying software (games, utilities, etc) for it will be much cheaper.



    I guess I want it to be more like a computer and less like a touch.
  • Reply 66 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    That's the least of it. You've just confirmed that you don't know much, really.



    Start here: http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...ics_maker.html or here: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-10371224-37.html and work backwards.





    Answer one question, when you 'recycle' your computer, where does it go? If you can answer that with proof to back it up, I'll make a promise never to respond to one of your posts again.



    I find it ironic that you link to a greenpeace article yet when they were hassling apple they were just apple haters. Classic anna.
  • Reply 67 of 110
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    ★ The iPad Big Picture

    There was a meta-message in today?s Apple event, not about the iPad in particular, but rather about Apple as a whole. Jobs?s brief preamble included a bit of extra emphasis on the fact that the Apple now generates over $50 billion per year in revenue. (Apple also emphasized this $50 billion revenue thing in their PR two days ago announcing their Q1 2010 financial results.) He also said that when you consider MacBooks as ?mobile? devices, that Apple generates more revenue from mobile hardware than any other company in the world; the three competitors he singled out were Sony, Samsung, and Nokia. The adjective he used was ?bigger?.



    Lastly, there?s the fact that the iPad is using a new CPU designed and made by Apple itself: the Apple A4. This is a huge deal. I got about 20 blessed minutes of time using the iPad demo units Apple had at the event today, and if I had to sum up the device with one word, that word would be ?fast?.



    It is fast, fast, fast. The hardware really does feel like a big iPhone ? and a big original iPhone at that, with the aluminum back. (I have never liked the plastic 3G/S iPhones as much as the original in terms of how it feels in my hand.) I expected the screen size to be the biggest differentiating factor in how the iPad feels compared to an iPhone, but I think the speed difference is just as big a factor. Web pages render so fast it was hard to believe. After using the iPhone so much for two and a half years, I?ve become accustomed to web pages rendering (relative to the Mac) slowly. On the iPad, they seem to render nearly instantly. (802.11N Wi-Fi helps too.)



    The iPad hardware is exactly what you think. It looks great, it feels great. It?s very nice to hold. (People are complaining about the wide bezel around the display, but without that, where would your thumbs go? You don?t want your thumb that?s holding the device to cover on-screen content or register as a touch. Trust me, it?s just right.) Just like with the iPhone, it?s all in the software. And the software is obviously marvelous in many ways. It is clearly the result of deep thought and hard work.



    But: everyone I spoke to in the press room was raving first and foremost about the speed. None of us could shut up about it. It feels impossibly fast. (And our next thought: What happens if Apple has figured out a way to make a CPU like A4 that fits in an iPhone? If they pull that off for this year?s new iPhone, look out.)



    Apple doesn?t talk much about the technical details of the iPhone. They never talk about CPU speed or the name of the chip being used. They don?t tell you how much RAM is in there. Part of their vision for moving computers from technical culture to popular culture is about getting away from defining these things by their technical specs. So the prominent talk about A4 is telling. This is something they want us to notice.



    I mentioned this year-ago quote from Apple COO Tim Cook the other day, but it?s apt here, too. Cook told BusinessWeek, ?We believe in the simple, not the complex. We believe that we need to own and control the primary technologies behind the products we make, and participate only in markets where we can make a significant contribution.?



    Apple now owns and controls their own mobile CPUs. There aren?t many companies in the world that can say that. And from what I saw today, Apple doesn?t just own and control a mobile CPU, they own and control the hands-down best mobile CPU in the world. Software aside (which is a huge thing to put aside), it may well be that no other company could make a device today matching the price, size, and performance of the iPad. They?re not getting into the CPU business for kicks, they?re getting into it to kick ass.



    They?re Microsoft and Intel rolled into one when it comes to mobile computing. In the pre-taped video Apple showed, Bob Mansfield said of the iPad, ?No one else could do it.? Only Apple.



    And so my takeaway from this ? with the bragging about making their own CPUs and their annual revenue and their size compared to companies like Sony, Samsung, and Nokia ? is that this is Apple?s way of asserting that they?re taking over the penthouse suite as the strongest and best company in the whole ones-and-zeroes racket.



    Daring Fireball 10-01-27 10:40 PM John Gruber http://daringfireball.net/
  • Reply 68 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Just curious: How do you deal with the environmental consequences of your own personal use of electronics? (I assume you use some).



    Or are you suggesting that, as long as you don't call them 'environmentally friendly,' you're fine with however they they are used and disposed of?



    I make sure I recycle them where I can, make sure I switch things off and not leave them in standby during their life (amazing how much power you can waste doing that), and I accept the fact that the manufacture of them is not environmentally friendly.



    I'm not advocating doing nothing, far from it, and in truth the semiconductor manufacturing industry is starting to do it's part as well, though mostly because electricity costs are going up and they want to reduce their bills.



    Whilst I mentioned I'm not sure it's right to call them environmentally friendly, that's not to say we shouldn't try.
  • Reply 69 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steviet02 View Post


    Answer one question, when you 'recycle' your computer, where does it go? If you can answer that with proof to back it up, I'll make a promise never to respond to one of your posts again.



    I find it ironic that you link to a greenpeace article yet when they were hassling apple they were just apple haters. Classic anna.



    Let me ask you this: Is the food you eat 'environmentally friendly' in how it is produced, consumed, and finally, expended/recycled?



    Actually, let me make it easier for you: is anything?



    If 'no,' are you a living oxymoron? (To go back to your original post).
  • Reply 70 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post


    I make sure I recycle them where I can, make sure I switch things off and not leave them in standby during their life (amazing how much power you can waste doing that), and I accept the fact that the manufacture of them is not environmentally friendly.



    I'm not advocating doing nothing, far from it, and in truth the semiconductor manufacturing industry is starting to do it's part as well, though mostly because electricity costs are going up and they want to reduce their bills.



    Whilst I mentioned I'm not sure it's right to call them environmentally friendly, that's not to say we shouldn't try.



    All good points.



    I just get tired of lazy comments that people make about things being 'oxymorons' or folks getting all snobby, just because companies do it. Many companies - Apple is merely one - are working hard to mitigate the impact of their environmental footprint.



    More important, I find it quite hypocritical that it is in the process of meeting our demands that these companies produce this crud, and yet, many of us wish to take no responsibility for the role the we play in it. (I see a similar snobbishness when it comes to discussions of China's pollution and emissions).
  • Reply 71 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Let me ask you this: Is the food you eat 'environmentally friendly' in how it is produced, consumed, and finally, expended/recycled?



    Actually, let me make it easier for you: is anything?



    If 'no,' are you a living oxymoron? (To go back to your original post).



    That's what I expected, total avoidance and an attempt to redirect the discussion. You just proved my point. You have no idea what you're talking about. Didn't you just tell someone else you didn't like cheap talk? Something about pot calling kettle black ring a bell?
  • Reply 72 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steviet02 View Post


    That's what I expected, total avoidance and an attempt to redirect the discussion. You just proved my point.



    What point was that? The one about (quote) "...electronic device and eco-friendly don't really belong in the same sentence" (unquote). Or your eating habits?
  • Reply 73 of 110
    I think the analyst has missed a ton of variables... and grossly underestimated the sales potential. If Apple can produce enough of them, I could see them easily surpassing that 8 million unit projection in this calendar year alone. Hell, at $499, they'll easily sell a few million of them just around the holidays...



    I also think they missed the potential of Apple's installed base. This device becomes a natural extension of the desktop/iPhone-iPod Touch devices on a number of levels...



    For example, I use an app called TouchOSC on my iPhone, for remote controlling plugins and parameters inside Ableton Live (running on my desktop or laptop)... the multi-touch aspect is magic. I'd buy an iPad just for this app alone! Larger screen? No-brainer! And I'm sure they'll release an iPad-specific version of that app as well, with more controls, etc...



    Combined with my iPhone (not replacing it), it'll give me tremendous control and flexibility...



    That extends to a number of other applications as well... great software + multi-touch interface + wireless communication (between the iPad and an existing computer)... the possibilities are amazing. And that will translate to huge sales, well beyond this analyst's very conservative outlook....



    Just my humble opinion...
  • Reply 74 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steviet02 View Post


    Didn't you just tell someone else you didn't like cheap talk? Something about pot calling kettle black ring a bell?



    I have not said one thing about anything in my life being environmentally friendly.



    Nor did I make snotty remarks about companies claiming to be so (or using/disposing of electronics claiming to be so) being contradictions.



    You did.
  • Reply 75 of 110
    daharderdaharder Posts: 1,580member
    [CENTER]Given the overwhelmingly luke-warm reception the iPad is receiving in the media, it might be best to wait a while before making any such loftily predictions.



    Personally, I'll be buying the 64gb/3G ASAP, but this could well be a case of Newton 2 - Electronic Fail-A-Loo[/CENTER]
  • Reply 76 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post


    [CENTER]Given the overwhelmingly luke-warm reception the iPad is receiving in the media, it might be best to wait a while before making any such loftily predictions.



    Personally, I'll be buying the 64gb/3G ASAP, but this could well be a case of Newton 2 - Electronic Fail-A-Loo[/CENTER]



    Is this the same media that said the iPhone would be a failure?

    At $500, Apple will struggle to keep up with demand. Even the Kindle sold out at one time...
  • Reply 77 of 110
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Neruda View Post


    True. But who says Apple is the only game in town? I can participate, just not with the iPad.



    As bad as the reputation of tablets have been up to this point (not ready for prime time, not done right, etc), there are windows based tablets that put this iPad to shame (functionality wise). I say that and I absolutely hate windows. But I would certainly choose a Windows 7 based tablet over this any day. No comparison.



    As bad as the reputation of smart phones have been up to this point (not ready for prime time, not done right, etc), there are WinMo based phones that put this iPhone to shame (functionality wise). I say that and I absolutely hate windows. But I would certainly choose a WinMo based phone over this any day. No comparison.



    Really, the iPad hate is an exact replay of the iPhone rollout. It's almost comical.
  • Reply 78 of 110
    I can't wait! I think despite the haters that it will be a big seller!





    http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.htm...2&pf_rd_i=ipad
  • Reply 79 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    All good points.



    I just get tired of lazy comments that people make about things being 'oxymorons' or folks getting all snobby, just because companies do it. Many companies - Apple is merely one - are working hard to mitigate the impact of their environmental footprint.



    More important, I find it quite hypocritical that it is in the process of meeting our demands that these companies produce this crud, and yet, many of us wish to take no responsibility for the role the we play in it. (I see a similar snobbishness when it comes to discussions of China's pollution and emissions).



    I don't disagree with anything you say. I guess my problem is with the overuse of the phrase "environmentally friendly" when really it's being used as a marketing slogan designed to absolve people of the need to worry about what they are doing.



    In reality, given I've got a Macbook Pro which I can use for computing on the go, I've got an iPod Touch which I can use for "holding the internet in my hand", I don't actually need an iPad, and it would be better for the environment if I didn't buy something that I don't actually need. Now, I admire people who would be in that position and would take the high ground and not buy one. I won't take the high ground and I'll buy one, I'm just not sure it's healthy for people in my position to be told what they are doing is environmentally healthy.



    I don't advocate stopping people doing what they want, but lets not sugar coat it.
  • Reply 80 of 110
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post


    [CENTER]Given the overwhelmingly luke-warm reception the iPad is receiving in the media, it might be best to wait a while before making any such loftily predictions.



    Personally, I'll be buying the 64gb/3G ASAP, but this could well be a case of Newton 2 - Electronic Fail-A-Loo[/CENTER]



    The last product with a lukewarm reception was the iPhone 3GS. Actually that's not true, it was the camera-less iPod touch. Those devices went on to record sales. Apple products by a rule have very muted receptions. I wouldn't judge this device by it's reception or by what it doesn't have. I think the iPad has a very big upside, especially with a $500 base price.
Sign In or Register to comment.