Apple provides additional details, renderings for Cupertino campus project

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 94
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,502member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Windsor Smith View Post


    Yeah, I've lived in Silicon Valley for 25 years, and I've never seen any evidence of apple orchards -- just the pitted fruits, like cvaldes1831 said.



    However, despite what was reported in the article, Apple's latest landscaping plan for the site shows more types of fruit trees than just apricots; there will also be cherries, plums, olives, and, yes, apples.



    Steve's name for Apple comes from his work in Oregon on Apple Orchards, if I recall his Biography correctly.



    Apricot Orchards was what Steve mentioned specifically were all around him in his chilldhood.



    Historically speaking, Santa Clara has a large Fruit Tree farming mecca before WWII.



    http://www.sfgenealogy.com/santaclar.../scchist12.htm
  • Reply 62 of 94
    Solar panels are great until there is a short and they catch on fire. When there is a short in the wiring under the panels, there is no way to turn off power from the solar panels. Since you can't turn off the sun, the only way to stop the short is to cover the solar panels with blankets which is what fire fighters try to do. If it's not covered, the fire spreads quickly and shorts out the other panels spreading the problem further and faster. With the entire roof of this huge building covered in solar panels, I really hope they design some kind of motorized covering or foam system to block sun to the solar panels. If they don't, the resulting fire would do massive damage.
  • Reply 63 of 94
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    The Steven P Jobs building.
  • Reply 64 of 94
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GadgetCanada View Post


    Solar panels are great until there is a short and they catch on fire. When there is a short in the wiring under the panels, there is no way to turn off power from the solar panels. Since you can't turn off the sun, the only way to stop the short is to cover the solar panels with blankets which is what fire fighters try to do. If it's not covered, the fire spreads quickly and shorts out the other panels spreading the problem further and faster.



    And this happens often, does it?
  • Reply 65 of 94
    Just have to give a shout out for Washington apples since my grandfather grew them 50 yrs ago there. I believe Washington has considerably more apple orchards than Oregon. But hey, it's not a contest just thought I'd put my .02 cents in.



    Any George Carlin fans?

    "and now a message from the national apple coalition...

    [email protected] pears"
  • Reply 66 of 94
    donarbdonarb Posts: 52member
    Oh great. Now that the plans have been released, expect Samsung to have a copy of their circular headquarters built in the near future.
  • Reply 67 of 94
    Hmmm.... someone else had the idea first:

    http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/spon...ction-ornament



    Kidding, kidding..... just couldn't resist!



    Your idea sounds very intriguing.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    I am currently designing a circular house for myself with a floor level (just one floor) 10' below ground.



    With just 10' of the home (the main central room) visible above ground, giving the exterior of the home a modest, neat and minimal dome-like appearance, with the main 50' circular underground living area a 20' interior ceiling height at the center of the house with a 15' structural glass window in the center of it to bring in natural daylight. The whole house will be constructed using poured concrete formwork giving every wall an 18" waterproof thickness which not only keeps the home very dry, but regulates the interior temperature in winter and summer. This structure will be built to last centuries.



    I'm not an architect nor do I have the money to build it yet; I reckon it will cost around ?4-7M, but I will have the money to build it someday and thy will be done.



    It will having one floating bedroom overlooking the main room 8' above the main floor area covering about 1/10 of the main area below with a 1' wall stopping you falling off the edge containing basically a large bed, a locker and a wardrobe along the opposite exterior wall. Then an additional piano mezzanine for playing piano while looking out one of the three curved windows in the structure with your eves at outdoor ground-level as another floating structure with a 1' wall around it located at another point above the the main large room. The bedroom will have floating concrete stairs up to it with each step as a separate wall-anchored unit. There will be no handrail. The piano mezzanine will feature no stairs as there will be a hidden lift that rises from the ground to transport budding musicians up to play it.



    The two large spare en-suite bedrooms, the main bathroom, the W.C., the utility room, the kitchen and the modest swimming pool will all be underground and off the main room with each given a 10' glass structural ceiling that will be flush with the exterior grass and capable of supporting the weight of a ride-on lawnmower.



    The main James Bond-esque living room will feature a snooker table, a centrally located marble dining table with 8 colored chairs, a TV sofa entertainment area, a stairs to the floating bedroom, a lift to the piano mezzanine and a breakfast bar area all over a polished concrete underfoot-heated floor. All rooms off the central area will have regular door-width entrances with no actual doors, and the kitchen will have an arch door entrance the width of its room. The interior walls will retain the unpainted yet smooth concrete look with soft-textured colorful furnishings peppered throughout the home to wonderfully contrast the solid minimal industrial looking structure and its clean lines.



    The home will be entered via tunnel from the drive-down-in underground triple-garage area located around 40 feet from it. The home will be complimented with the a minimal but beautiful Japanese garden.



    That's the plan and I'm sticking to it.



  • Reply 68 of 94
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Andersen View Post


    The word you want is 'renderings'. 'Renders' is only a noun in a very specific context, and this isn't it. Otherwise interesting writes.



    I was thinks the same thing!
  • Reply 69 of 94
    quazarquazar Posts: 21member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GadgetCanada View Post


    Solar panels are great until there is a short and they catch on fire. When there is a short in the wiring under the panels, there is no way to turn off power from the solar panels. Since you can't turn off the sun, the only way to stop the short is to cover the solar panels with blankets which is what fire fighters try to do. If it's not covered, the fire spreads quickly and shorts out the other panels spreading the problem further and faster. With the entire roof of this huge building covered in solar panels, I really hope they design some kind of motorized covering or foam system to block sun to the solar panels. If they don't, the resulting fire would do massive damage.



    I understand that circuit breakers have already been invented…



    Also I would expect this to be a quality instillation…
  • Reply 70 of 94
    irelandireland Posts: 17,754member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Hmmm.... someone else had the idea first:

    http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/spon...ction-ornament



    Kidding, kidding..... just couldn't resist!



    Your idea sounds very intriguing.



    Ya bastard! Haha!
  • Reply 71 of 94
    Just think what it would look like if the whole exterior glass was actually active retinal glass!

    We could all sit around and watch movies from the street.



    I wonder if they've thought of putting a running track on the roof (in addition to on the ground).



    You know, it's SO symbolic of Jobs to plop down this big spaceship right on top of the HP buildings!



    G
  • Reply 72 of 94
    f1ferrarif1ferrari Posts: 262member
    Just out of fairness, has Samsung announced a new HQ recently? I was just wondering if they had something, maybe oval in shape, in mind...
  • Reply 73 of 94
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by F1Ferrari View Post


    Just out of fairness, has Samsung announced a new HQ recently? I was just wondering if they had something, maybe oval in shape, in mind...



    You mean a copy of a circle but not quite as accurate as it should be?
  • Reply 74 of 94
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,166member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    I was pretty surprised to see the base isolation-- it seems out of favor for this type of building. But, I guess you don't really mave many options for lateral shear walls to tie everything together. Could it possibly be acting as a single seismic structure with just expansion joints?



    It is a low rise steel structure with glass and transparency as main architectural feature. So shear walls are not the best solution. Base isolators are very important in seismic areas and it is really a must if you have sensitive equipments like computers and servers. If you can afford them then you should use them. Check out Pasadena City Hall.



    I don't know what you mean by single structure with just expansion joints. Those expansion joints should separate structures completely from the foundation to the roof. They width of the joints need to accommodate structural movement during an earthquake so that the buildings don't touch when they sway. They could be as large as one foot.
  • Reply 75 of 94
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    I wonder if there'll be a fruit stand selling Apple apricots?
  • Reply 76 of 94
    galbigalbi Posts: 968member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Just about the freaking coolest building ever. And certainly the coolest office building.




    You need to get out more.



    Search Dubai, UAE.
  • Reply 77 of 94
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Galbi View Post


    You need to get out more. Search Dubai, UAE.



    Being the tallest doesn't mean as much as it used to mean to me. None of these new race-to-the-top skyscrapers have any differentiation to them anymore. They're all variations on the 'spike that slowly gets sections shaved down as it rises' theme. The Illinois did that in '56, for crying out loud.



    The WTC was a revolution in skyscrapers. Taipei 101 had class. The Pentominium looks really interesting, if terrifying, but it's on hold.



    Apple's new office building is regional practicality combined with simplicity in a unique form.
  • Reply 78 of 94
    dh87dh87 Posts: 72member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post


    If you're insinuating that Apple should be planting apple orchards, well, you're wrong.



    Apricots and other stone fruits are the historic crops in this part of Santa Clara County. The street that connects Apple's current HQ on 1 Infinite Loop to De Anza Boulevard is Mariani Avenue; the Apple HQ used to be on Mariani Ave (on the other side of De Anza Blvd) in the company's formative years. The road was named after a farming family (of Croatian origin, if I remember correctly) that used to have orchards in the area.



    Today's one of that family's descendants is still farming, albeit in Morgan Hill: Andy Mariani (http://www.andysorchard.com). He's a stone fruit expert. Much of the fruit farming has moved to south Santa Clara County where property is cheaper and more plentiful, however the entire area is superb for stone fruit cultivation.



    Three miles north of Cupertino in Santa Clara is the historic C.J. Olson fruit stand. The enormous cherry orchards have long been built over, there's a small heritage cherry orchard in Sunnyvale. In Saratoga -- a few miles south of Cupertino -- the plums were rather famous. There's a heritage stone fruit orchard around the Saratoga Public Library.



    The Marianis and Olsons were part of a wave of immigrants in the late 19th century who planted fruit orchards (mostly stone fruit) and vineyards (mostly for wine production). Apples were never a commonly planted crop in western Santa Clara County.



    If you walk into a house in west Santa Clara County that was built in the Fifties and Sixties (like an Eichler), there's a good chance there's a heritage stone fruit tree or two in the backyard or maybe a newer one that replaced the original tree(s).



    Even today, apricot production is getting squeezed. Brentwood, Gilroy, Morgan Hill, Hollister: those are today's quality apricot growing areas, although many growers have moved away from the fabulous Blenheim apricot to other more commercially viable cultivars.



    Planting apricot trees in Cupertino is a tip of the hat to the settlers from 100-120 years ago.



    Remember that Steve Jobs grew up in Cupertino, probably would have walked by apricot orchards on his way to Homestead High.



    He selected apricot trees for a reason. Just like pretty much everything else Steve did.



    Thank you for posting this history. The LA Times has written about the disappearance of Blenheim apricots from cultivation:



    http://articles.latimes.com/2010/jun...watch-20100625



    I know that this post is central to the topic of this thread.
  • Reply 79 of 94
    tunetune Posts: 91member
    "O" is for original.



    Roman Colosseum











    Tulou in China











    Old Busch Stadium











    Maracana Stadium Brazil











    Apple Building











    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Apple's new office building is regional practicality combined with simplicity in a unique form.



  • Reply 80 of 94
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tune View Post






    Interesting, a bunch of open-air buildings that have nothing to do with office buildings nor would necessarily stand up in an earthquake?



    But of course you couldn't care less about being accurate or on the point. One out of four is good enough.



    The only actual comparison is that neat Chinese building, which can be said to serve much the same purpose as the Apple campus and apparently is also earthquake resistant. Thanks for the link to that. And goodbye.
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