Apple seeds OS X 10.9 Mavericks Developer Preview 6 to developers

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  • Reply 21 of 28

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by humm View Post


    There is still one big bug in OS X Maverick Beta 6. If you reply an email and you like to change the subject or add some text in it, it deletes the whole subject and it stays empty. This bug is there since beta 1 and is on several machines (imac and macbook air). The language is german.


    I hope they know about that issue and fix it as I guess quite a few people like to do that.



     


    I'm not aware of that issue - but if you've got 10.9 through official means, you should be able to report that through either Apple's bugreport or AppleSeed tools.

  • Reply 22 of 28
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by humm View Post


    If you reply an email and you like to change the subject or add some text in it, it deletes the whole subject and it stays empty. 



    I have no love for Mail on OS X or iOS. My complaint is that it does not recognize standard IMAP protocol from UNIX mail servers. On OS X when you ask it to get new mail it just downloads everything in the inbox regardless if it has a 'been read' flag or not. I realize this is probably the intended behavior but I don't want it to spend tons of time and bandwidth to get every message. I want to see the unread messages only. On iOS there is no way to look at your sent messages or re-read emails unless they originally were sent from the device or originally read on the device. I use my other desktop machines for most of my email and they easily understand when a message was sent or read on the iPhone but the inverse is not the case. I'm sure Apple Mail works fine with iCloud.com email but it sucks at standard corporate mail running on Unix. 

  • Reply 23 of 28
    jlljll Posts: 2,713member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post




    I have no love for Mail on OS X or iOS. My complaint is that it does not recognize standard IMAP protocol from UNIX mail servers. On OS X when you ask it to get new mail it just downloads everything in the inbox regardless if it has a 'been read' flag or not. I realize this is probably the intended behavior but I don't want it to spend tons of time and bandwidth to get every message. I want to see the unread messages only.




     


    You can set it to not keep messages, then it won't download them. You will see the list of e-mails, but it won't download them.


     




    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post




    On iOS there is no way to look at your sent messages or re-read emails unless they originally were sent from the device or originally read on the device.





     


    What? That't totally wrong. On my IMAP accounts I can see every single message in every folder.

  • Reply 24 of 28
    chabigchabig Posts: 640member
    On one hand, mstone is complaining because Mail downloads every message. And on the other hand he is complaining because he thinks iOS Mail does not. Of course, with IMAP they both stay in sync with the server, as they should.
  • Reply 25 of 28
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member


    Really?  That is counter to all the other reports from developers that I have read.

  • Reply 26 of 28
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,124member
    humm wrote: »
    There is still one big bug in OS X Maverick Beta 6. If you reply an email and you like to change the subject or add some text in it, it deletes the whole subject and it stays empty. This bug is there since beta 1 and is on several machines (imac and macbook air). The language is german.
    I hope they know about that issue and fix it as I guess quite a few people like to do that.

    There are other nasty bugs: if you have a smart mailbox and you mark a mail as junk, it's only marked as junk, not moved to the junk mailbox, but if you're in the inbox, it's actually moved to the junk mailbox as it should, too. This is "new behavior" since 10.9; and very annoying, since I replaced the regular inbox with a smart mailbox called "ToDo".

    Also, some changes in IOKit result in the ZEVO implementation of ZFS' drivers no longer properly loading; so if you moved mission critical data to a ZFS formatted drive to take advantage of ZFS' data integrity features, you'll have a rude awakening after the 10.9 upgrade: you can't access your data.
    The latter is the biggest show-stopper in 10.9; the other is that TotalSpaces is (so far) incompatible.

    Aside from that 10.9 is mostly another pleasant recovery release from the 10.7 disaster. 10.7 was truly Apple's Vista. 10.8 made things usable again, and 10.9 continues mostly on that path.

    A few notable exceptions though: XCode is dumbed down (e.g. no indication on where supplemental material is installed and iBook's media management is lazy and retarded compared to what iTunes does: a total downgrade on how your books and PDFs are managed.)
  • Reply 27 of 28

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rcfa View Post



    The latter is the biggest show-stopper in 10.9; the other is that TotalSpaces is (so far) incompatible.


     


    I got TotalSpaces as part of a bundle and installed it but I just didn't get what it gave me over what was built-in. I kept it there but finally uninstalled it shortly before installing 10.9. Likewise I found TotalFinder a bit redundant with 10.9 and uninstalled it too. What I really miss is Hyperspaces (which was, sadly, broken with 10.7). It was the best desktop manager I found with great shortcuts for switching a loads of customization between virtual screens.


     


    Aside from that 10.9 is mostly another pleasant recovery release from the 10.7 disaster. 10.7 was truly Apple's Vista. 10.8 made things usable again, and 10.9 continues mostly on that path.


     


    I guess I was one of the rare folk who didn't have any troubles with 10.7. It certainly didn't exhibit any of the suck that Vista did. Not in my experience.


     


    A few notable exceptions though: XCode is dumbed down (e.g. no indication on where supplemental material is installed and iBook's media management is lazy and retarded compared to what iTunes does: a total downgrade on how your books and PDFs are managed.)


     


    I've found iBooks to be both promising and unusable. It's great with my non-DRM content (in fact I find it more useful in some ways than the Kindle ecosystem as all of the PDFs and non-DRM books I've ever opened in iBooks in my iOS devices automatically showed up in iBooks - with my Kindle I've had to manually add any content I didn't specifically purchase from Amazon [or send to my device via my Kindle email address] to my Kindle device and my Kindle apps), but with the few books I purchased from Apple I get the dreaded "The Apple ID you're currently using doesn't match the one that was used to purchase this book." It may be because my iCloud ID is different than my Apple ID. I haven't found a way to sign out of iBooks unless it's tied to what I'm signed in to for iTunes. Also, with iTunes you can Get Info on media to find out which account it's tied to (handy when I have a US iTunes account and a Japan iTunes account), or if you try to play protected content in iTunes you're asked to authenticate and authorize under the account the media is tied to. With iBooks there does not appear to be any way to find out which account content is tied to. There is no Get Info (maybe this will come), and I do not seem to have an option to authorize iBooks after the initial launch. Perhaps there's a plist file out there I can delete...

  • Reply 28 of 28
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,124member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by djames4242 View Post




    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rcfa View Post



    The latter is the biggest show-stopper in 10.9; the other is that TotalSpaces is (so far) incompatible.


     


    I got TotalSpaces as part of a bundle and installed it but I just didn't get what it gave me over what was built-in. I kept it there but finally uninstalled it shortly before installing 10.9. Likewise I found TotalFinder a bit redundant with 10.9 and uninstalled it too. What I really miss is Hyperspaces (which was, sadly, broken with 10.7). It was the best desktop manager I found with great shortcuts for switching a loads of customization between virtual screens.




     


    The issue is, that the entire Mission Control concept sucks and is another dumbing-down of the UI. TotalSpaces allows for a toroidal topology of the various screens. In a 3x3 layout, that means you can scroll 1-2-3-1-2-3 or 4-5-6-4-5-6 or 7-8-9-7-8-9 or 1-4-7-1-4-7 or 2-5-8-2-5-8 or 3-6-9-3-6-9 (or reverse, of course), which means no screen is ever more than two cursor movements away from any other screen, often it's only one. Way more efficient than going through a linked list of screens or having to expose all screens and select one with the mouse.


     






    Aside from that 10.9 is mostly another pleasant recovery release from the 10.7 disaster. 10.7 was truly Apple's Vista. 10.8 made things usable again, and 10.9 continues mostly on that path.


     


    I guess I was one of the rare folk who didn't have any troubles with 10.7. It certainly didn't exhibit any of the suck that Vista did. Not in my experience.





     


    The issue with 10.7 was the UI, the worst blunders were fixed in 10.8, e.g. the idiocy of grouping and stacking windows on a per application basis, which is non-sensical. If I work on three projects, each on a different screen, each maybe using a bunch of web pages for research, a text document for reporting and spreadsheet for crunching numbers, while having a web page with YouTube open on another screen, etc. then I want to see all the windows associated with a particular project (space), not all the windows associated with a particular app. In 10.7 the various app windows were so tightly stacked, that it was useless.


    In 10.8 the "Group windows by application" setting was added to the Mission Control preferences, which one now can thankfully turn off, making the UI somewhat usable again. Similarly, OS X Server was a joke in 10.7, now it's slowly regaining some of the functionality that was axed in the transition from 10.6 to 10.7, etc.


     


    The issue is, that Apple tries to turn OS X into another iOS, but if I wanted to use iOS, I'd be using iOS and not OS X. The reason I use OS X is because iOS is crippled, and I don't need ANY step that makes OS X more like iOS, if I need anything, then it's something that makes iOS more like OS X.


     







    A few notable exceptions though: XCode is dumbed down (e.g. no indication on where supplemental material is installed and iBook's media management is lazy and retarded compared to what iTunes does: a total downgrade on how your books and PDFs are managed.)


     


    I've found iBooks to be both promising and unusable. It's great with my non-DRM content (in fact I find it more useful in some ways than the Kindle ecosystem as all of the PDFs and non-DRM books I've ever opened in iBooks in my iOS devices automatically showed up in iBooks - with my Kindle I've had to manually add any content I didn't specifically purchase from Amazon [or send to my device via my Kindle email address] to my Kindle device and my Kindle apps), but with the few books I purchased from Apple I get the dreaded "The Apple ID you're currently using doesn't match the one that was used to purchase this book." It may be because my iCloud ID is different than my Apple ID. I haven't found a way to sign out of iBooks unless it's tied to what I'm signed in to for iTunes. Also, with iTunes you can Get Info on media to find out which account it's tied to (handy when I have a US iTunes account and a Japan iTunes account), or if you try to play protected content in iTunes you're asked to authenticate and authorize under the account the media is tied to. With iBooks there does not appear to be any way to find out which account content is tied to. There is no Get Info (maybe this will come), and I do not seem to have an option to authorize iBooks after the initial launch. Perhaps there's a plist file out there I can delete...


     





     


    Exactly, the things are some of the issues I was talking about. None of these were issues while iTunes managed the iBooks content for iOS devices, and there was no reason for iBooks to dumb down and castrate the media management as compared what iTunes did. I fear that the same crippled media management will rear its ugly face in a future version of iTunes, because otherwise it's not clear to me why the iBooks programmers didn't just start out with the iTunes code, cut out all the parts they didn't need, and add the book reading parts to it. That way, they could have saved themselves all the head aches of reinventing any sort of media management in the first place. So assuming these programmer weren't even more stupid than lazy (which truly is a sin), then one can only guess that iBooks is the start of a new code base for media management that will end up being adopted by iTunes. Good riddance! 

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