Apple, IBM debut three new iOS apps for enterprise

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    What does any enterprise partnership garner for any OS Vendor? If you have to ask then you have no experience in the area. It has nothing to do with private apis.

    Sure, the bottom line is increased revenue and profit, but that doesn't explain what this partnership does for these apps that IBM couldn't have done on their own. The fact that so many are skirting the question tells me you all haven't really thought about this particular case.
  • Reply 22 of 32
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,510moderator
    solipsismy wrote: »
    What does this partnership get them with these apps that IBM couldn't have done on its own? Access to still private APIs?

    IBM probably could have deployed these apps and services but they'll get a huge boost from being an official partner with Apple because there's no way that schools buying iPads would immediately think to get in contact with IBM to supply them with software and management capabilities. Similarly Apple doesn't do this kind of server-side data processing for enterprise applications. I think they'll work well together. Microsoft had an advantage in doing both enterprise and consumer together.
  • Reply 23 of 32
    I think this is gong to one heck of a partnership that will give iOS and even greater lead that no other mobile OS can compete with. I just hope this is all exclusive and we won't see version of anything for Android or Microsoft, from IBM (aka the Adobe approach to partnering with Apple).

    As I understand it, Apple is highly involved in the app design, I can't see Apple's contract/partnership will allow the apps showing up on other platforms.

    rogifan wrote: »
    All of these apps so far look really nice. If Apple is involved in the design can they bring some of that to iOS, especially first party apps?

    I too hope to see some of this leak out for more general business use on the iDevices platform... I did have to smirk when I was looking over the Passenger Care app... Every air carrier on the planet will use this except Delta which will have to learn to hate the MS Surface even more... ;)
  • Reply 24 of 32
    Marvin wrote: »
    solipsismy wrote: »
    What does this partnership get them with these apps that IBM couldn't have done on its own? Access to still private APIs?

    IBM probably could have deployed these apps and services but they'll get a huge boost from being an official partner with Apple because there's no way that schools buying iPads would immediately think to get in contact with IBM to supply them with software and management capabilities. Similarly Apple doesn't do this kind of server-side data processing for enterprise applications. I think they'll work well together. Microsoft had an advantage in doing both enterprise and consumer together.

    Might I also mention that IBM is offering a total solution/maintenance solution for major companies. It is by working closely with Apple that Apple has created new AppleCare programs for enterprise to make Apple and IBM's partnership work more friendly to the end users. There's much more going on under the hood to make this program work than just the apps.

    Apple has traditionally done well with the school market, but the rest of the large business and government customer base has been a mixed bag for Apple over the years. IBM is strong on the enterprise side of the customer handling, so each partner does what they do best to be a "WIN" for the end user.

    Finally, like you said, the Apple name is a powerful lever for IBM to use in negotiations... The Microsoft name is still to be reckoned with, but it now brings more baggage with it than does the IBM/Apple names.
  • Reply 25 of 32
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 906member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Sure, the bottom line is increased revenue and profit, but that doesn't explain what this partnership does for these apps that IBM couldn't have done on their own. The fact that so many are skirting the question tells me you all haven't really thought about this particular case.

    Perhaps you should review the various definitions of your chosen screen name:

    sol?ip?sism s?l??p?s?z??m, s??l?p?
    n.
    Philosophy
    The theory that the self is the only thing that can be known and verified.
    The view that the self is the only reality.
    Absorption with oneself without consideration for the needs and desires of others: a self-indulgent memoir that revealed the author’s solipsism.
    Latin s?lus, alone; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + Latin ipse, self + –ism.
    sol?ip?sist n.
    sol?ip?sis?tic adj.

    ____________________________________
    American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition Copyright © 2011-2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. © 2013-2014 Enfour.

    Though this helps me understand your particular brand of logic, after the recent passing of "Mr. Spock", one might better come to realize that "logic" does not necessarily buy one immortality. ;-)

    Perhaps, then, there is something superior to logic: how about simple unclouded observation?
  • Reply 26 of 32
    [B]One statement that stood out to me in the IMB/Apple announcement last December was this one:[/B]

    [SIZE=4]"[I]IBM's apps are built exclusively for iPhone and iPad, and are delivered in a secure environment, embedded with analytics and linked to core enterprise processes. The apps can be customized for any organization and easily deployed, managed and upgraded via cloud services[/I], IBM and App[/SIZE]le said."

    There are several nuggets in this statement. First, the security of the environment. This means the company's date is more secure then on any other mobile platform. Apple's platform is inherently secure. Enough so to make ?Pay set a standard other's cannot reach. Next, "Embedded with analytics," which I see as a tool that talks back to Big Data, so the system gets smarter as it is used. No longer are iDevices just serving the user, but updating the database on the Big Iron to detect incoming trends and prepare for them by tweaking the app. Finally, the apps are customized from the inception and able to be managed and upgraded via cloud services.

    [COLOR=blue]No longer are apps to be passive but a active element in the processes to bring about apps more tuned to daily changes in the way the processes work. It's like the HW and SW are part of a closed loop collecting data and reacting to the subtle changes it discovers ... while everyone in a business segment starts out with a customized app that is much like everyone else's... how it's used and the data it collects begins to diverge and mold the app to one tuned to that corporation's business... [/COLOR]
  • Reply 27 of 32
    solipsismy wrote: »
    paul94544 wrote: »
    err.. just guessing but an intuitive and easy to use front end!

    I'd think there are plenty of developers they could hire to create a useful, clean and beautiful front end.

    Note: I don't mean to sound like I'm knocking the partnership and hope that it continues over to the Mac, which would be a major coup.

    I'd love to see the Mac get some loving from this partnership, but I think the main emphasis of the partnership is to use highly mobile iDevices (currently the iPhone and iPad) to handle highly secure corporate data (into and out of) the iDevice. This level of security of data which makes Apple the logical selection by IBM to support and the enterprise client to trust.

    We can try to imagine of this partnership may grow to include new equally secure iDevices, for example, an iOS laptop. I suspect that data security is a cornerstone of this partnership... the apps are the UI,and the data gathering and reporting back. IBM, in their ads to enterprise, constantly pound the drum that one needs to speedily respond to changing condition before the other guy. The iDevice is the secure platform, the app is what the user sees, but all the magic for the enterprise is how all this morphs into a faster reaction to new data... a tight feedback loop. It may seem as if the iDevice with its app is a self-learning device, but it's only a part of the loop that a user is aware of ... there's the Big Data also reporting to management, and that reporting of changes can be as granular as management can absorb and act on.
  • Reply 28 of 32
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    danielsw wrote: »
    Perhaps, then, there is something superior to logic: how about simple unclouded observation?

    I observed that you're still not answered questions. Seems like that would be easy if you truly do have an unclouded and absolute observation of this deal. Why you refuse to share this info without snark, well, that's another question entirely.
  • Reply 29 of 32
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,693member
    I don't have sight of what other IBM services are necessary but this is definitely the way to go; robust productised software with (what appears to be) high-level customisation.

    I thought about getting an app design through my current company but decided against it as there was no evidence of it not being totally compromised by IT practice before landing in the users' hands. One of the biggest benefits of this partnership I can see is how it could circumvent current IT infrastructure & practice which is the root cause of IT productivity failure.

    I wish them luck.
  • Reply 30 of 32
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,693member
    I saw some other article about this where the author describes these apps as being extremely bland.  It was an odd description for something you can't taste or eat.  I got the impression that the author thought these apps weren't quite up to handling business needs like some full-blown Windows desktop application but that may just my personal opinion.  Either these apps do the job they're expected to do or they don't.  They look pretty simplified but if they make things easier for the users, then what difference does it make if they're not highly complicated to use.  It's not the first time I've heard people say these apps were too plain-looking to be of any use to businesses.  I was never aware that an application had to have a certain look to be useful.  Only time will tell whether these apps are useful or not for the people who use them.

    Presumably not a single review as no reviewer could be qualified to know what "good" is across such a broad range of subject areas. The most productive apps are incredibly simple and to the point and easily lost on those who aren't the intended user.

    Nobody in IT would be qualified to make a valid assessment.
  • Reply 31 of 32
    As far as the new IBM/Apple apps, I had higher expectations, but perhaps the partners didn't provide enough impressive value details to impress Natalie or us. I imagine both executive groups are also in a "wait and see" mode, as they figure out how to make the most of this partnership.

    http://www.casperon.com/mobile-application-development/
  • Reply 32 of 32
    As far as the new IBM/Apple apps, I had higher expectations, but perhaps the partners didn't provide enough impressive value details to impress Natalie or us. I imagine both executive groups are also in a "wait and see" mode, as they figure out how to make the most of this partnership.

    http://www.casperon.com/mobile-application-development/
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