Watch Effect: Apple Watch hints at a Siri who's always just a shout away

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  • Reply 21 of 36
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    neat Siri tip -- instruct her to "learn how to pronounce [contact xxxx]", and she will run thru a multi-part wizard that allows you to set the pronunciation for the first and last names of that contact.
  • Reply 22 of 36
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,717member

    This vaguely reminds me of the Newton MP. It had a rudimentary input system based on learning a specific handwriting style. It was sort of neat for it's time, as it had an input that wasn't a keyboard. Dictation software was all the rage then too. In the end, it simply didn't have the accuracy or polish necessary. Powerbooks took off, people got used to using them for the tasks, and that was that.

     

    For Siri to be acceptable, it really has to be dead on accurate all the time. I know many people that tried it, see it is unreliable, and then never use it again. Fairly, I'm in the category myself. It just isn't useful to me in it's current form.

  • Reply 23 of 36
    ge forcege force Posts: 4member
    No SIRI for Mac OS X ? Oh well.
  • Reply 24 of 36
    dtm1212 wrote: »
    Well Apple has a lot of work to do on Siri to get it to understand what is asked if it is going to be a universal way of doing things. On my iPhone 6 Siri is successful about 30% at best.

    I like the Siri one where I invoke "Hey Siri" in the middle of the night, dead silent bedroom and ask, "Hey Siri what time is it? and get back Siri responding with options for Time Magazine! So useful.


    Siri is always accurate for me tho I do get Siri activating when any word has the 'siri' sound in it like seriously also when it's plugged in Siri randomly turns on when the room is silent I don't say anything and Siri activates


    This would be a great spying method tho.....
  • Reply 25 of 36
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post

     



    I just asked the same question...

     

    Me: How many weighs [sic] is Washington DC from here

    SiriIt looks like Washington, D.C. is about 307 miles away, Michael.

    [Map of Washington D.C.]

     

    Also...

     

    Me: How far away is Washington DC

    SiriWashington, D.C. is about 307 miles away, Michael.

    [Map of Washington D.C.]

     

    I'm not sure how you asked or even if Siri actually understood you, but even when she didn't "get" what I said exactly, she still understood what I wanted and gave it to me.

     

     

    Added Google results... "how many miles to washington dc"

    Got a map with driving directions. Hmmmm.




    Weird. I just tested, I got a map with Washington D.C. marked out. No kilometer value whatsoever. What could explain such discrepancy in our results?

  • Reply 26 of 36
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

     



    Weird. I just tested, I got a map with Washington D.C. marked out. No kilometer value whatsoever. What could explain such discrepancy in our results?




    Whoa. I asked exactly the same question again and it gave me a kilometer response. That's... weird.

  • Reply 27 of 36
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

     

     

    "Siri, I've had a crash, call an ambulance to my current location."  No need for Onstar!


    I would be very surprised if Apple took on the responsibility that Onstar does without a fairly expensive monthly fee...  If it works even slightly like my grandpa's warning system, they have a serious liability in case they don't respond properly to a crisis. Apple avoids "liability", as any sane tech company not in the health business (the real one, not the cool-device one) ;)

     

    Also, did you know you can name your Watch? I have no clue why I'd want that, but mine's Imperial Might from day one :)

  • Reply 28 of 36
    metalcasemetalcase Posts: 25member

    So the next Apple TV is going to be an Amazon Echo with TV controls.  Which would be awesome. The Echo is the coolest tech gadget Ive gotten since the iPhone.  If Apple's home assistant comes out at the same level, and there is no reason to think it wouldn't, they it will be a huge hit. And if is like the Echo and the software lives in the cloud, then Apple can improve the device without limit.  

  • Reply 29 of 36
    gwmacgwmac Posts: 1,800member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

     



    Whoa. I asked exactly the same question again and it gave me a kilometer response. That's... weird.


     

    Thanks for confirming my experience. I asked the exact same question and sometimes she told me the answer and sometimes I got a map like you. 

  • Reply 30 of 36
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    ...

    "Siri, I've had a crash, call an ambulance to my current location."  No need for Onstar!
    Not quite.
    • OnStar can can call when you can't.
    • OnStar does not need access to cell towers.
  • Reply 31 of 36
    I believe OnStar is cellular.
  • Reply 32 of 36
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

     

    This vaguely reminds me of the Newton MP. It had a rudimentary input system based on learning a specific handwriting style. It was sort of neat for it's time, as it had an input that wasn't a keyboard. Dictation software was all the rage then too. In the end, it simply didn't have the accuracy or polish necessary. Powerbooks took off, people got used to using them for the tasks, and that was that.

     

    For Siri to be acceptable, it really has to be dead on accurate all the time. I know many people that tried it, see it is unreliable, and then never use it again. Fairly, I'm in the category myself. It just isn't useful to me in it's current form.


     

    No voice system right now is even close to being reliable on the voice recognition and what it returns if you don't coach your demand to the systems quirks. Once you learn how they work, and their limitations, they're much much better.

  • Reply 33 of 36
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

     

     

    Thanks for confirming my experience. I asked the exact same question and sometimes she told me the answer and sometimes I got a map like you. 


    Tried the distance between Lille and Brussels, and I got the list of football players of Lille. What baffles me is, in each case, the sentence was perfectly translated to text. If Siri was silently misunderstanding you, I'd get the weirdness but here, we're talking of a 20% success rate, with a 60% completely off-the-mark rate, and a 20% "responded with something somehow related"... I'm stumped (and so, so curious of the underlying working of the system).

  • Reply 34 of 36
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by foggyhill View Post

     

     

    No voice system right now is even close to being reliable on the voice recognition and what it returns if you don't coach your demand to the systems quirks. Once you learn how they work, and their limitations, they're much much better.




    While true, that's also the Windows philosophy, and I certainly expect Apple to offer much more than this. I think Siri does too much in a not-so-efficient way, and it would be way better if it only knew how to change the music, set reminders, send emails/sms/messages, and start calls and timers... That's already a lot, and it does it relatively well. The rest of the features muddles up the efficiency of the whole system, for now.

  • Reply 35 of 36
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    bolen mac wrote: »
    I believe OnStar is cellular.
    The optional ability to place cellular phone calls is a feature of OnStar. However, OnStar works whether or not you can get a cellular signal.
  • Reply 36 of 36
    ahmlcoahmlco Posts: 432member

    Siri also wants to be expanded, but I think for that to happen Apple is going to need to allow apps to be set as "defaults" for certain actions. E.g., all find-a-restaurant-related questions go to Yelp, all movie questions go to IMDB, and so on.

     

    Otherwise you end up with the same problem as you do when you double-click a text document on the Mac. Lot's of people can open it, but who does so by default?

     

    Similarly, lot's of apps could answer "where are the best tacos?" But which one should do so?

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