Man pleads guilty in celebrity iCloud hacking case, admits to phishing scheme

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    jony0jony0 Posts: 270member
    ireland said:
    So when's the trial for the NSA heads who broke privacy laws and lied to congress on the record? And the Wall St. bankers who broke the law and caused the worst global economic crisis in decades?

    Also, this shows the state of US media and journalism when all people talked about was iCloud hacking, when 1. no hack took place and 2. more gmail accounts were message with and I never even heard about the gmail part of the story until now.

    And unfortunately that state of US media and journalism includes AppleInsider that also uses hacking case right in the title. I just wanted to double-check before posting and to my dismay the Mac dictionary has this for hacker :
       a person who uses computers to gain unauthorized access to data.

    Surprised and disappointed, I turned to Wikipedia :
       someone who seeks and exploits weaknesses in a computer system or computer network.

    Now that’s more like it. Excluding the other hacker meaning of an enthusiastic and skillful computer programmer or user, my own perception and that of family, friends, acquaintances and strangers, both technically savvy and not, a hack is akin to a break & entry, whereas what the phishing issue here is like leaving the key under the mat. And you can’t blame the lock manufacturer for that. I had to repeat this many times to explain that iCloud was never hacked, the people responsible are not hackers, they’re just thieves who got the key. I would’ve expected an Apple centric news service to know that distinction as well.

    edited March 2016 iSRS
  • Reply 22 of 32
    jony0 said:
    ireland said:
    So when's the trial for the NSA heads who broke privacy laws and lied to congress on the record? And the Wall St. bankers who broke the law and caused the worst global economic crisis in decades?

    Also, this shows the state of US media and journalism when all people talked about was iCloud hacking, when 1. no hack took place and 2. more gmail accounts were message with and I never even heard about the gmail part of the story until now.


    And unfortunately that state of US media and journalism includes AppleInsider that also uses hacking case right in the title. I just wanted to double-check before posting and to my dismay the Mac dictionary has this for hacker :

       a person who uses computers to gain unauthorized access to data.

    Surprised and disappointed, I turned to Wikipedia :
       someone who seeks and exploits weaknesses in a computer system or computer network.

    Now that’s more like it. Excluding the other hacker meaning of an enthusiastic and skillful computer programmer or user, my own perception and that of family, friends, acquaintances and strangers, both technically savvy and not, a hack is akin to a break & entry, whereas what the phishing issue here is like leaving the key under the mat. And you can’t blame the lock manufacturer for that. I had to repeat this many times to explain that iCloud was never hacked, the people responsible are not hackers, they’re just thieves who got the key. I would’ve expected an Apple centric news service to know that distinction as well.

    Exactly.

    I can write an HTML email with the Apple logo in it... and then link it to a fake webpage that looks like the iCloud login page.

    That wouldn't make me a "hacker" though.

    But "phisher" doesn't sound as threatening in a headline  :)
  • Reply 23 of 32
    jony0jony0 Posts: 270member
    jony0 said:


    And unfortunately that state of US media and journalism includes AppleInsider that also uses hacking case right in the title. I just wanted to double-check before posting and to my dismay the Mac dictionary has this for hacker :

       a person who uses computers to gain unauthorized access to data.

    Surprised and disappointed, I turned to Wikipedia :
       someone who seeks and exploits weaknesses in a computer system or computer network.

    Now that’s more like it. Excluding the other hacker meaning of an enthusiastic and skillful computer programmer or user, my own perception and that of family, friends, acquaintances and strangers, both technically savvy and not, a hack is akin to a break & entry, whereas what the phishing issue here is like leaving the key under the mat. And you can’t blame the lock manufacturer for that. I had to repeat this many times to explain that iCloud was never hacked, the people responsible are not hackers, they’re just thieves who got the key. I would’ve expected an Apple centric news service to know that distinction as well.

    Exactly.

    I can write an HTML email with the Apple logo in it... and then link it to a fake webpage that looks like the iCloud login page.

    That wouldn't make me a "hacker" though.

    But "phisher" doesn't sound as threatening in a headline  
    Good point, and I can't necessarily fault the author as it could be the clickbaitor editor in chief. Unfortunately phishing should be used more often because it is far more prevalent and threatening. Good encryption is extremely hard if not impossible to hack nowadays. Hopefully the government will keep it that way or else who'll bother with silly tricky low success rate phishing schemes when you can just easily march right through the backdoor.
    edited March 2016
  • Reply 24 of 32
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member
    foggyhill said:
    latifbp said:
    As much as I don't like Drumpf and I hold Democratic values, this guy is right. This is all Obama. He is in charge of the DOJ and FBI.
    He;s in charge of the DOJ but not the FBi, though they seemingly have the same playbook, which makes them seem to all be all one happy family ;-).
    The FBI is part of the DOJ.
  • Reply 25 of 32
    iSRSiSRS Posts: 32member
    Wait, I thought it was all Apple's fault? I thought they were the ones hacked? That is all the media says, and I trust the media 100%

    That is because we all want all the news we can get, as fast as we can get it*

    *Provided that each piece of news fits in 140 characters or less
    edited March 2016
  • Reply 26 of 32
    kpluckkpluck Posts: 500member
    "We continue to see both celebrities and victims from all walks of life suffer the consequences of this crime and strongly encourage users of Internet-connected devices to strengthen passwords and to be skeptical when replying to emails asking for personal information."
    "...and please support us (government) having a backdoor installed on all your devices so it won't matter what password you choose."

    -kpluck
    jony0
  • Reply 27 of 32
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    steveh said:
    foggyhill said:
    He;s in charge of the DOJ but not the FBi, though they seemingly have the same playbook, which makes them seem to all be all one happy family ;-).
    The FBI is part of the DOJ.
    They're independent since watergate.
  • Reply 28 of 32
    jony0jony0 Posts: 270member
    foggyhill said:
    steveh said:
    The FBI is part of the DOJ.
    They're independent since watergate.
    That certainly would make sense to me as an extra safeguard, but Wikipedia still lists the FBI Parent as the DOJ with no mention of Watergate. Do you have another source ?
  • Reply 29 of 32
    This is old news. The FBI released details a couple times about the iCloud "hacks" and we've known all along they were phishing attempts or other forms of social engineering.

    The giveaway? The FBI listed the numbers of accounts and the number of attempts to gain access (which averaged around 2.5 times per account). Yet we STILL have idiots running around claiming that iCloud was brute force hacked. You all remember that one. That POS loser wrote a script, put it on GitHub, and claimed it could brute force iCloud passwords. Then when researchers tried it out they found it didn't work. To which he replied "Well, it USED to work, but I guess Apple fixed it, so now it doesn't." Of course, this idiot didn't have a single shred of evidence it ever worked and all the Apple haters/fandroids gobbled it up as if it was the gospel truth.
  • Reply 30 of 32
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    foggyhill said:
    latifbp said:
    As much as I don't like Drumpf and I hold Democratic values, this guy is right. This is all Obama. He is in charge of the DOJ and FBI.
    He;s in charge of the DOJ but not the FBi, though they seemingly have the same playbook, which makes them seem to all be all one happy family ;-).
    Isn't the FBI a tool of the DOJ?
  • Reply 31 of 32
    "Reports at the time suggested iCloud itself had been hacked, but Apple denied those claims. It appears the company was correct in its assessment."

    And will all the Apple haters and pundits who demonized Apple for this breach please stand up and take it like a man. You've been owned!
    edited March 2016 jony0
  • Reply 32 of 32
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,454member
    "Reports at the time suggested iCloud itself had been hacked, but Apple denied those claims. It appears the company was correct in its assessment."

    And will all the Apple haters and pundits who demonized Apple for this breach please stand up and take it like a man. You've been owned!

    As well as all the self proclaimed experts who for years have proclaimed that it is so trivial to hack an iPhone, lol, ha ha ha, Android  rulz! They all have egg on their faces now, including John McAfee. If the government truly cannot get into that San Bernardino iPhone then let them hire one these “experts” who claim they do it in a few trivial minutes. Just yesterday on MacBreak Weekly Leo LaPorte and the boys were trying to unlock their iPhones using a supposed flaw in iOS published on Youtube. Try as they might the hack wouldn’t work and concluded it was a hoax. That’s the problem here. The Internet is full of nonsense and posers claiming all manner of things to stroke their pitiful egos. It’s a mental illness yet people still tend to believe stuff they read on the Internet.
    jony0
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