Samsung sets up Note 7 exchange booths at airports around the world

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 45
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,175member
    In the US, the TSA has a drop off bin at the security checkpoint...
    edited October 2016 lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 45
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,870member
    Are you sure it's Sammy and not the local bomb squad?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 45
    anomeanome Posts: 1,463member
    dreyfus2 said:
    The even bigger problem now (for them and their customers) is that crews can't really tell the devices apart. Multiple reports from people who had their non-Note Galaxys or non-7 Notes taken away. The official(?) captain's announcement on Lufthansa does not refer to the Note 7 in particular, but to Samung Galaxy mobiles in general...

    This is the biggest fuck-up in the history of the modern smartphone; still, the coverage is clearly below "Antennagate" levels. At least we do know now what it takes to get Samsung to provide any personal customer service at all. (My sister's Edge - dead on arrival - is shipping back and forth since release day, now has been returned two times as "repaired" without even turning on. Just don't buy anything from these clowns.)

    The reason it's got less coverage than "Antennagate" is that no journalists or celebrities have had a Galaxy Note 7 blow up on them. Antennagate got coverage because it affected (or seemed to affect) people with ready access to a media outlet. It was also vague enough that people who might not have actually been affected could blame issues with their carrier on it. (Say your carrier drops out when you walk around a street corner in a particular area, you might think it was actually this problem with the phone everyone's been talking about, and not even consider bad placement of cell-towers. On the other hand, it's much less likely some other factor will make the phone in your pocket suddenly burst into flames.)

    As to your first point, and the following:

    macxpress said:
    In the US, the TSA has a drop off bin at the security checkpoint...

    I wonder how many people are going to drop perfectly functional non-Galaxy Note 7 phones into the bin? Sure the TSA probably don't know how to tell the "explode-y" phones from the "non-explode-y" phones, but I suspect a large number of consumers can't either, and so there might be a few S7s or even HTC phones thrown in the bin.

    watto_cobraapres587
  • Reply 24 of 45
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 969member
    Everybody is talking about this. A friend of mine just flew from Sacramento to San Diego on Southwest Airlines and when he got back he told me about all the warnings the flight attendants were giving out. Samsung is the new Ford Pinto!
    pscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 45
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,175member
    anome said:
    dreyfus2 said:
    The even bigger problem now (for them and their customers) is that crews can't really tell the devices apart. Multiple reports from people who had their non-Note Galaxys or non-7 Notes taken away. The official(?) captain's announcement on Lufthansa does not refer to the Note 7 in particular, but to Samung Galaxy mobiles in general...

    This is the biggest fuck-up in the history of the modern smartphone; still, the coverage is clearly below "Antennagate" levels. At least we do know now what it takes to get Samsung to provide any personal customer service at all. (My sister's Edge - dead on arrival - is shipping back and forth since release day, now has been returned two times as "repaired" without even turning on. Just don't buy anything from these clowns.)

    The reason it's got less coverage than "Antennagate" is that no journalists or celebrities have had a Galaxy Note 7 blow up on them. Antennagate got coverage because it affected (or seemed to affect) people with ready access to a media outlet. It was also vague enough that people who might not have actually been affected could blame issues with their carrier on it. (Say your carrier drops out when you walk around a street corner in a particular area, you might think it was actually this problem with the phone everyone's been talking about, and not even consider bad placement of cell-towers. On the other hand, it's much less likely some other factor will make the phone in your pocket suddenly burst into flames.)

    As to your first point, and the following:

    macxpress said:
    In the US, the TSA has a drop off bin at the security checkpoint...

    I wonder how many people are going to drop perfectly functional non-Galaxy Note 7 phones into the bin? Sure the TSA probably don't know how to tell the "explode-y" phones from the "non-explode-y" phones, but I suspect a large number of consumers can't either, and so there might be a few S7s or even HTC phones thrown in the bin.

    I'm sure the TSA has been briefed on what to look for in the bins. You "may" be able to sneak it by but its not worth the risk to try it either. I'd rather catch my flight than be pulled into a room and asked 50 questions. Its not like they're just gonna confiscate the phone and let you go. 
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 26 of 45
    roakeroake Posts: 765member


    Im surprised the airports allow those things on the property.
    nolamacguy[Deleted User]watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 45
    anomeanome Posts: 1,463member
    macxpress said:
    anome said:
    dreyfus2 said:
    The even bigger problem now (for them and their customers) is that crews can't really tell the devices apart. Multiple reports from people who had their non-Note Galaxys or non-7 Notes taken away. The official(?) captain's announcement on Lufthansa does not refer to the Note 7 in particular, but to Samung Galaxy mobiles in general...

    This is the biggest fuck-up in the history of the modern smartphone; still, the coverage is clearly below "Antennagate" levels. At least we do know now what it takes to get Samsung to provide any personal customer service at all. (My sister's Edge - dead on arrival - is shipping back and forth since release day, now has been returned two times as "repaired" without even turning on. Just don't buy anything from these clowns.)

    The reason it's got less coverage than "Antennagate" is that no journalists or celebrities have had a Galaxy Note 7 blow up on them. Antennagate got coverage because it affected (or seemed to affect) people with ready access to a media outlet. It was also vague enough that people who might not have actually been affected could blame issues with their carrier on it. (Say your carrier drops out when you walk around a street corner in a particular area, you might think it was actually this problem with the phone everyone's been talking about, and not even consider bad placement of cell-towers. On the other hand, it's much less likely some other factor will make the phone in your pocket suddenly burst into flames.)

    As to your first point, and the following:

    macxpress said:
    In the US, the TSA has a drop off bin at the security checkpoint...

    I wonder how many people are going to drop perfectly functional non-Galaxy Note 7 phones into the bin? Sure the TSA probably don't know how to tell the "explode-y" phones from the "non-explode-y" phones, but I suspect a large number of consumers can't either, and so there might be a few S7s or even HTC phones thrown in the bin.

    I'm sure the TSA has been briefed on what to look for in the bins. You "may" be able to sneak it by but its not worth the risk to try it either. I'd rather catch my flight than be pulled into a room and asked 50 questions. Its not like they're just gonna confiscate the phone and let you go. 


    I don't see why they wouldn't. It's typically what they do when they find other material you're not supposed to take on a plane. Assuming, of course, they find it.

    I mean, maybe not if they found explosives or guns, but for screwdrivers, nailfiles, scissors, etc, they just confiscate them and send you on your way. At least in the instances I'm aware of.

  • Reply 28 of 45
    So the booth is a bomb disposal depot? What if all the Note7 blowup at the same time?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 45
    sandor said:
    Samsung had tables set up & helping customers at ORD - O'hare in Chicago.


    Tables, huh?... Well, they're not taking any chances here at CDG - Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris...
    edited October 2016 watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 45
    dsddsd Posts: 186member


    An unidentified booth in New Jersey.                      
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 45
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,047member
    birko said:
    Smart move. If someone finds that they can fly with their device but can get a new Samsugg galaxy on the spot, more may do this than get money back and switch brands. 
    not sure i follow that...

    i think this is more about ensuring samsung doesn't get sued for a kajillion dollars if one of their bombs brings down a jetliner full of people.
    It makes perfect sense. It boils down to not being about the problem, but how the problem is taken care of. The motivation is irrelevant.

    A customer getting on the plane with a N7, and having to be removed or surrender their phone, or just getting jammed by TSA for having the phone, isn't likely to be too pleased with Samsung. 

    The fact that a customer can get their phone— possibly a dangerous device and definitely contraband—replaced on the spot as mentioned, could go far in preserving customer loyalty. Even if it's not Samsung's goal, it can certainly have an impact on churn.
  • Reply 32 of 45
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,047member

    cali said:
    What a mess. It's like they're embarrassing themselves on purpose
    Exactly what is it that makes you think they're deliberately 'embarrassing' themselves. Projection?
  • Reply 33 of 45
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,047member

    badmonk said:
    if you need a booth in an airport to tell you that your GN7 needs to be exchanged, you are the type of fool that buys a GN7.
    That's a dumbass comment that makes no logical sense whatsoever. 
  • Reply 34 of 45
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,047member

    Apple should have a booth there, too, for exchanging Note 7 with iPhone 7. 
    That would make Apple the smartphone equivalent of an ambulance chaser.
  • Reply 35 of 45
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,047member
    anome said: I suspect a large number of consumers can't either, and so there might be a few S7s or even HTC phones thrown in the bin.
    I'm sure you must be right since it's absolutely impossible for anyone to know the model number of any given Samsung product, and there's no possible way to alert the TSA of exactly what to look for and how to ID a Note 7. Just like it's impossible to determine if an iPhone is a 6 or 6s. 

    We're all doomed.
  • Reply 36 of 45
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,047member
    viclauyyc said:
    So the booth is a bomb disposal depot? What if all the Note7 blowup at the same time?
    Yes, they drop the phones into pressure cookers of gasoline, thermite, and magnesium powder because it's a known fact that 1 in 3 Note 7s have a spontaneous violent exothermic reaction.

    No doubt that's the extent of preventive measures Samsung has put in place. That's how they roll, right?
  • Reply 37 of 45
    anomeanome Posts: 1,463member
    macgui said:
    anome said: I suspect a large number of consumers can't either, and so there might be a few S7s or even HTC phones thrown in the bin.
    I'm sure you must be right since it's absolutely impossible for anyone to know the model number of any given Samsung product, and there's no possible way to alert the TSA of exactly what to look for and how to ID a Note 7. Just like it's impossible to determine if an iPhone is a 6 or 6s. 

    We're all doomed.


    I didn't say it was impossible, just that some(many) people don't actually know what model their phone is. That includes iPhone users. Many people don't set out to buy an "iPhone 7" or a "Samsung Galaxy Note" they just go with the one the sales person tells them has the features they want, or that comes free with the phone plan that lets them call their kids/parents/mistress for free.

    Note, I'm also not saying these people are particularly stupid, just that they don't care about that kind of detail.

    As for the TSA, they have to deal with a lot of people in the average US airport - every single one of whom is in a hurry, and I doubt they particularly have the time or care enough to check whether a phone is a particular model. Plus there have been many incidents of them confiscating things they shouldn't, and letting through things on the banned list.

  • Reply 38 of 45
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,291member
    dreyfus2 said:
    This is the biggest fuck-up in the history of the modern smartphone; still, the coverage is clearly below "Antennagate" levels. At least we do know now what it takes to get Samsung to provide any personal customer service at all. (My sister's Edge - dead on arrival - is shipping back and forth since release day, now has been returned two times as "repaired" without even turning on. Just don't buy anything from these clowns.)
    I remember Antennagate and at some extent Bendgate. The news circulating on that time was huge, and most of them sounded like Apple was doom. Compare that to Samsung now it's like the problem that Samsung has is insignificant (did I really say that? Did the media really think human life is insignificant compare to antenna problem? Or is it just because Apple an easier target?)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 39 of 45
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,016member
    I don't follow the Samsung line at all -- but wasn't the Note 7 considered their top of the line model? If that's the case, then wouldn't exchanging it for another Samsung product be a downgrade (ignoring the 3rd degree burn/car up in flames/house up in flames/aircraft down in flames possibilities)?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 40 of 45
    Even if the media isn't reporting on it as much as they should at least the news will still be getting out there in other ways. I work for a large government department in Australia (Around 30,000 employees) and there was an email sent to all staff advising them if they are traveling for business purposes that the Note 7 has been banned on all flights in Australia including carry on and checked luggage.
    watto_cobra
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