Comparison: Which Apple MacBook is right for you?

135

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 92
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,267member
    My sense, looking at the lineup and reading the comments is that, with the Mac line) Apple has shifted from the Jobs style of "making great products that make people's lives better" to simply "Making great products".

    Jobs goal was the person -- not the product.  The product was means to the end -- not the end.
    dysamoriapulseimagestokyojimu
  • Reply 42 of 92
    512ke said:
    The Mac I already have. MBA i7. 

    The new models don't offer enough of an upgrade over the above to justify the $$$$$. 


    I also have a MBA and the new MBP, the main problem of MBA is the screen. It is an absolute crap, not just the resolution but the viewing angles are horrible.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 43 of 92
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,330member
    If I'm going to blow my last wad of cash ever on a new computer, what I don't want is:

    • a disposable computer that will commit suicide by thermal fatigue within three years.

    • a computer that will slow down while under heavy loads due to the throttling of the CPU/GPU (to protect its lousy design from burning up).

    • a screen smaller than 17"

    • fewer than four I/O ports when plugged into mains power. 

    • something that requires an entire motherboard replacement for a single component failure (in a failure-prone scenario of wild heat fluctuations during periods of use and sleep), leading to inefficient and expensive repairs. 

    So, no MacBook is right for me. What's right for me is a desktop computer that's not made of disposable laptop components. Apple's only relevant offering is more than three years old, doesn't support a Retina display or thunderbolt 3/USB-C, and costs an insane amount of money considering its outdated specs.
    edited January 2017 frankeedGeorgeBMacavon b7
  • Reply 44 of 92
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,725member

    Eric_WVGG said:

    MplsP said:

    I don't need high end graphics but do need a higher resolution display. I need USB A for a security key I use for work. I need good battery life...

    These things are not a big hassle. Sounds like a basic Macbook would work great.


    StrangeDays said:

    MplsP said:

    I don't need high end graphics but do need a higher resolution display. I need USB A for a security key I use for work. I need good battery life...


    I have to agree with imperial forces - Apple's got nothing for me. Why should I pay $2k for a computer that forces me to make compromises? If I want compromises, I can get a windows laptop for ⅓ the price. 

    Then why haven't you? Everything's a compromise. For your use case you can use USBA on a new MBP with a simple adapter. But I don't have your use case so I'm glad I don't have to make compromises that would favor yours alone.


    macplusplus said:


    You cannot get a Windows laptop with NVMExpress SSD for 1/3 the price. Because there are none.


    And before USB A you need updated libraries and appropriate java for your security key. With all those obsolete libraries and abandoned Java versions for your security SIM card you will be bound eternally to Windows XP then what are you doing in an Apple forum?


    stimpy said:

    After waiting for the new models, I felt the best bet was backwards to a high end 2015 15in. 


    Like many others I know, I am a long time Mac user who is becoming increasingly disaffected with Apple offering machines at a premium price that underperform and force users to make unnecessary compromises. My point was that I expect such compromises from cheap win books. not $2k+ MacBook pros. 


    I need at least a 13” screen, so a basic MacBook is out. After doing a comparison, I have to agree with Stimpy. For the vast majority of users, myself included, the 2016 lineup amounts to little more than a significant price hike with little increase in functionality. Precious few people need 4 thunderbolt 3 outputs, but the vast majority of users have at least one USB A device they use. For a $400 price increase you get marginally better performance, a gimmicky touch bar, and a somewhat better screen but loose the functionality & convenience of even a single USB A connection, you loose significant battery life, you get a (subjectively) inferior keyboard, and you have to pay extra for a 3rd party mag safe connector (and any other dongles you need.) 


    Laptops inherently involve compromises, but most if not all of the ‘compromises’ in the 2016 MacBooks are actually conscious decisions by Apple that were unnecessary. I like OS X and am very reticent to leave, but find it increasingly difficult to justify the ‘apple price premium’ 


    edited January 2017 dysamoriafrankeedavon b7
  • Reply 45 of 92
    momoomomoo Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    apple should have really made a macbook pro 14" and 16" WITH dedicated graphics, sd card reader and a new magsafe and without that touchbar.  
    plus a macbook 12" and 14" with two and four ports and new magsafe.  
    all with the old pro and air prices.
    so four notebooks and everybody would have been happy.
    edited January 2017 avon b7
  • Reply 46 of 92
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,461member
    MplsP said:

    Eric_WVGG said:

    MplsP said:

    I don't need high end graphics but do need a higher resolution display. I need USB A for a security key I use for work. I need good battery life...

    These things are not a big hassle. Sounds like a basic Macbook would work great.


    StrangeDays said:

    MplsP said:

    I don't need high end graphics but do need a higher resolution display. I need USB A for a security key I use for work. I need good battery life...


    I have to agree with imperial forces - Apple's got nothing for me. Why should I pay $2k for a computer that forces me to make compromises? If I want compromises, I can get a windows laptop for ⅓ the price. 

    Then why haven't you? Everything's a compromise. For your use case you can use USBA on a new MBP with a simple adapter. But I don't have your use case so I'm glad I don't have to make compromises that would favor yours alone.


    macplusplus said:


    You cannot get a Windows laptop with NVMExpress SSD for 1/3 the price. Because there are none.


    And before USB A you need updated libraries and appropriate java for your security key. With all those obsolete libraries and abandoned Java versions for your security SIM card you will be bound eternally to Windows XP then what are you doing in an Apple forum?


    stimpy said:

    After waiting for the new models, I felt the best bet was backwards to a high end 2015 15in. 


    Like many others I know, I am a long time Mac user who is becoming increasingly disaffected with Apple offering machines at a premium price that underperform and force users to make unnecessary compromises. My point was that I expect such compromises from cheap win books. not $2k+ MacBook pros. 


    I need at least a 13” screen, so a basic MacBook is out. After doing a comparison, I have to agree with Stimpy. For the vast majority of users, myself included, the 2016 lineup amounts to little more than a significant price hike with little increase in functionality. Precious few people need 4 thunderbolt 3 outputs, but the vast majority of users have at least one USB A device they use. For a $400 price increase you get marginally better performance, a gimmicky touch bar, and a somewhat better screen but loose the functionality & convenience of even a single USB A connection, you loose significant battery life, you get a (subjectively) inferior keyboard, and you have to pay extra for a 3rd party mag safe connector (and any other dongles you need.) 


    Laptops inherently involve compromises, but most if not all of the ‘compromises’ in the 2016 MacBooks are actually conscious decisions by Apple that were unnecessary. I like OS X and am very reticent to leave, but find it increasingly difficult to justify the ‘apple price premium’ 


    Take your security key.

    Spend less than you would for a Starbucks coffee.

    Put this on the end.

    Go on about your business with a great laptop.

    The end.
  • Reply 47 of 92
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,919member
    MplsP said:

    Eric_WVGG said:

    MplsP said:

    I don't need high end graphics but do need a higher resolution display. I need USB A for a security key I use for work. I need good battery life...

    These things are not a big hassle. Sounds like a basic Macbook would work great.


    StrangeDays said:

    MplsP said:

    I don't need high end graphics but do need a higher resolution display. I need USB A for a security key I use for work. I need good battery life...


    I have to agree with imperial forces - Apple's got nothing for me. Why should I pay $2k for a computer that forces me to make compromises? If I want compromises, I can get a windows laptop for ⅓ the price. 

    Then why haven't you? Everything's a compromise. For your use case you can use USBA on a new MBP with a simple adapter. But I don't have your use case so I'm glad I don't have to make compromises that would favor yours alone.


    macplusplus said:


    You cannot get a Windows laptop with NVMExpress SSD for 1/3 the price. Because there are none.


    And before USB A you need updated libraries and appropriate java for your security key. With all those obsolete libraries and abandoned Java versions for your security SIM card you will be bound eternally to Windows XP then what are you doing in an Apple forum?


    stimpy said:

    After waiting for the new models, I felt the best bet was backwards to a high end 2015 15in. 


    Like many others I know, I am a long time Mac user who is becoming increasingly disaffected with Apple offering machines at a premium price that underperform and force users to make unnecessary compromises. My point was that I expect such compromises from cheap win books. not $2k+ MacBook pros. 


    I need at least a 13” screen, so a basic MacBook is out. After doing a comparison, I have to agree with Stimpy. For the vast majority of users, myself included, the 2016 lineup amounts to little more than a significant price hike with little increase in functionality. Precious few people need 4 thunderbolt 3 outputs, but the vast majority of users have at least one USB A device they use. For a $400 price increase you get marginally better performance, a gimmicky touch bar, and a somewhat better screen but loose the functionality & convenience of even a single USB A connection, you loose significant battery life, you get a (subjectively) inferior keyboard, and you have to pay extra for a 3rd party mag safe connector (and any other dongles you need.) 


    Laptops inherently involve compromises, but most if not all of the ‘compromises’ in the 2016 MacBooks are actually conscious decisions by Apple that were unnecessary. I like OS X and am very reticent to leave, but find it increasingly difficult to justify the ‘apple price premium’ 


    So all your whining is about a USB-C to USB A adapter? Don't worry your neighbor PC repair shop will give you one for free.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 48 of 92
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,919member
    designr said:
    I've got a 13" MacBook (mid-2011) w/4GB RAM, 128GB SSD, 1.7 GHz Intel Core i5.

    I'm thinking a 13" MacBook Pro w/16GB RAM, 256GB SSD, 2.9GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 feels like it might be worth it. A little hard to say. The touch bar isn't a strong selling point right now but may become more useful in the future. The retina display and the upgraded graphics chip also seem worthwhile. And while I may not upgrade my external display immediately, the ability to run dual 4K or 5K displays seems appealing.

    My employer is giving me about $750 toward a machine. Might be able to get $200 for my current MBA. And there's a nice AppleInsider deal for that machine (space gray) w/AppleCare and no sales tax for $2,098 that brings my net out to about: $1,100.

    I might just do this.
    The Touch Bar is a strong selling point with TouchID fingerprint sensor and Apple Pay. You unlock the laptop, authorize your Apple Pay purchase with your fingerprint on your MBP. No other computer offers such a convenience yet.
    edited January 2017
  • Reply 49 of 92
    512ke512ke Posts: 782member
    512ke said:
    The Mac I already have. MBA i7. 

    The new models don't offer enough of an upgrade over the above to justify the $$$$$. 


    That's not a true statement. It's a tool. Do you need new tools? Then yes, it's worth spending money on your tools. If you don't need new tools, then no, it may not be. But with a range of $1500-2800, I find it hard to take your crit seriously. My last rMBP cost $2500 and had less capacity than these, so I don't really see the beef.
    It's not simply a choice of "do I need this tool?" The reason is that most already have a set of robust tools = our current Macs.  Now here comes Apple offering a new upgraded tool for sale. So one has gotta ask. What's the added value of the new?  What does it let me do new better or faster? Are there ways this new tool is actually worse? What am I gaining, what am I losing and how much will it cost me? It's more complex than buying a new tool. You may need it but you have to really think about how much of that need is just want. And what is the opportunity cost of spending say 3$K for a tool that lets me do the same stuff I can do now marginally better. That's my personal view anyway. I'm not disrespecting yours. 
    frankeedavon b7
  • Reply 50 of 92
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,982member
    Stukey said:
    I'm sitting on a 13" Retina display MacBook Pro of 2011 vintage. I've replaced the battery, I've changed it to SSD from spin drive, I've over-RAMed it (at 16 MB), and yesterday I used Aperture to process RAW Christmas photos on MacOS Sierra. So, with less ability to upgrade the machines on the market today, what incentive does the current crop of MacBooks offer me?  Slightly faster processor?  That's it. Therefore, until Apple snaps-back to "user oriented designs" (where upgradability is design principle no. 1), I'm looking at 1/3 to 1/2 the price Windows machines for the work I need from a laptop. Aperture is obsoleted by Apple so the software is not a holding point (Lightroom will do).

    sad when you read this. I loved Apple laptops.  :(
    MBP Retina wasn't announced until Mid 2012. How the hell could you get it in 2011?
  • Reply 51 of 92
    StanWStanW Posts: 6member
    For the money I have found that the MacBook Air is the better choice. I know that Apple will be no longer be making this laptop but I as well as my family have purchased 4 and love everyone of them. For what we need a laptop for you can't beat them. I don't mind a less sharper screen. I do mind that the new Pros and MacBooks do not support USB items without an adapter. The Air is still very fast. I mean how fast do you really need to open a program? I think Apple has lost their way with customer needs and satisfaction. This is from a person that has had and still have Apple products for 30 years.
    entropysfrankeedtokyojimu
  • Reply 52 of 92
    momoomomoo Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    @stan i think the same.
    the best thing would have been a macbook 12" and 14" as the air replacements for the same prices and 14" and 16" mbps with dedicated graphics each without the touchbar for the old price! easy line up and everyboday would have been happy. 
  • Reply 53 of 92
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,982member
    jdw said:
    As always, I appreciate the excellent videos that AppleInsider puts out.  But I must say that I am very pleased with the 2015 15" MBP (fully loaded with 1TB SSD, 16GB RAM and dGPU) I purchased in mid-Dec. 2016 from QualityMacs in San Diego.  I had a 2016 MBP 15" (fully loaded) on order with Adorama for over a month, starting in Nov. 2016, but I cancelled the order the second week of December when they refused to offer me even general guidance on when my machine could be delivered.  But what made me feel more at ease about the cancellation and the subsequent ordering of the 2015 model was the fact that the older model is really the best MBP you can get TODAY.  The 2016 model is very much TOMORROW's Mac.  

    A lot of people say that the 2016 model will have everything we need when USB-C takes over. But that is laughable because even 1.5 years hence, USB-C will not be ubiquitous.  I would not expect USB-C to become truly mainstream (seen everywhere) until about 5 years from now.  And how many MBP variants will Apple release during that time?  Probably two.  Therefore, it seems awfully foolish for Apple to have killed the SD card and not put even a single USB-A port on this 2016 model.  Had they made it a "bridge" machine (bridging our USB-A needs today with the USB-C needs of tomorrow), it would have been even more popular than Apple says the 2016 model is now.  Not that I really care at this point though since I have my 2015 MBP.

    I love the tactical feedback on the 2015 model's keyboard, and I really don't care if the keys wobble a teensy bit and are "less accurate."  I don't care that the reds and greens on my display don't blind my eyes (my 5K iMac has that -- it's neat, but not a must-have feature).  I love having the USB-A ports, the HDMI port, MagSafe, and a realistically sized trackpad that doesn't need palm rejection to work flawlessly every time.  The speakers sound more than good enough to my ears.  And the fans don't come on that much, especially if I keep the dGPU turned off.  I'm not a professional photographer, but my u4/3 camera uses an SD card, and I love the slot in this 2015 MBP as a result, plus I can use SD cards for supplemental storage too.  The only advantage the 2016 model has over my 2015 model, in my eyes, is (1) Space Gray and (2) slightly smaller and lighter body and (3) Touch ID.  But considering all the things I consider negative on the 2016 model, those 3 positives don't really mean much.  The most important of the 3 would be Touch ID.  I'd love to unlock the Mac and access password protected sites with just my fingerprint.  But to give up every other good thing just for that?  No way.

    If you're still on the fence about what to buy, I can only recommend a 2015 model MBP.  I searched EBAY and ADORAMA and B&H for new and lightly used machines and I ended up with QualityMacs.  Amazingly good support.  These guys even replied to me on a holiday, more than once.  They also sell Macs slightly used with valid AppleCare.
    To make it short: you troll because the new MBP doesn't cater to your non-typical usage? 95% of the population will be okay. I had my 2015 MBP with 256GB HD. I added 200GB mSD card with BaseQi adapter. Guess what? I haven't used the 200GB mSD at all since I installed it 18 months ago. HD upgradability is nice to have but not a big deal and the same as RAM. 
    pulseimages
  • Reply 54 of 92
    Stukey said:
    I'm sitting on a 13" Retina display MacBook Pro of 2011 vintage. I've replaced the battery, I've changed it to SSD from spin drive, I've over-RAMed it (at 16 MB), and yesterday I used Aperture to process RAW Christmas photos on MacOS Sierra. So, with less ability to upgrade the machines on the market today, what incentive does the current crop of MacBooks offer me?  Slightly faster processor?  That's it. Therefore, until Apple snaps-back to "user oriented designs" (where upgradability is design principle no. 1), I'm looking at 1/3 to 1/2 the price Windows machines for the work I need from a laptop. Aperture is obsoleted by Apple so the software is not a holding point (Lightroom will do).

    sad when you read this. I loved Apple laptops.  :(
    No credibility here.  It is really sad that you think your 2011 MacBook Pro 13" has a retina display...it does not.  The 13" Retina MacBook Pro did not exist until Late 2012.  The Retina MacBook Pros never had a traditional spinning hard drive.  You upgraded your MacBook Pro 13" from 4 GB to 16MB?  It is not a secret that the 2011 models supported 16GB of RAM.  Many people still use Aperture and iPhoto, so what's your point?  What does that have to do with upgrading memory, a hard drive, and a battery?  Current models ship with 16GB standard.  No need to upgrade.  Current models ship with flash storage that is incredibly faster than your SSD.  Again, no need to upgrade the SSD.  All the comments here are typical whining from millennials.  No one is forcing you to use a Mac.  Go tell your parents to buy you a Windows laptop.  You can set it next to the trophy you got for doing nothing.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 55 of 92
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,330member
    fallenjt said:
    Stukey said:
    I'm sitting on a 13" Retina display MacBook Pro of 2011 vintage. I've replaced the battery, I've changed it to SSD from spin drive, I've over-RAMed it (at 16 MB), and yesterday I used Aperture to process RAW Christmas photos on MacOS Sierra. So, with less ability to upgrade the machines on the market today, what incentive does the current crop of MacBooks offer me?  Slightly faster processor?  That's it. Therefore, until Apple snaps-back to "user oriented designs" (where upgradability is design principle no. 1), I'm looking at 1/3 to 1/2 the price Windows machines for the work I need from a laptop. Aperture is obsoleted by Apple so the software is not a holding point (Lightroom will do).

    sad when you read this. I loved Apple laptops.  :(
    MBP Retina wasn't announced until Mid 2012. How the hell could you get it in 2011?
    And he only has 16MB on it...
  • Reply 56 of 92
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,982member
    alexmac said:
    512ke said:
    The Mac I already have. MBA i7. 

    The new models don't offer enough of an upgrade over the above to justify the $$$$$. 


    I also have a MBA and the new MBP, the main problem of MBA is the screen. It is an absolute crap, not just the resolution but the viewing angles are horrible.
    You were ok when you bought it. Why is it crap all the sudden? 
    edited January 2017 pulseimagesGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 57 of 92
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,982member
    momoo said:
    @stan i think the same.
    the best thing would have been a macbook 12" and 14" as the air replacements for the same prices and 14" and 16" mbps with dedicated graphics each without the touchbar for the old price! easy line up and everyboday would have been happy. 
    People will find the reason to troll even if Apple make every possible configuration at every inch of screen size!
    pulseimagespscooter63
  • Reply 58 of 92
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,919member
    StanW said:
    For the money I have found that the MacBook Air is the better choice. I know that Apple will be no longer be making this laptop but I as well as my family have purchased 4 and love everyone of them. For what we need a laptop for you can't beat them. I don't mind a less sharper screen. I do mind that the new Pros and MacBooks do not support USB items without an adapter. The Air is still very fast. I mean how fast do you really need to open a program? I think Apple has lost their way with customer needs and satisfaction. This is from a person that has had and still have Apple products for 30 years.

    Why do you compare a Macbook Air to a MBP? If you don't need to drive two 5K monitors at once then the Macbook Air is good for you. That doesn't mean that Apple has lost their way because Macbook Air is enough for you
  • Reply 59 of 92
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,919member
    512ke said:
    512ke said:
    The Mac I already have. MBA i7. 

    The new models don't offer enough of an upgrade over the above to justify the $$$$$. 


    That's not a true statement. It's a tool. Do you need new tools? Then yes, it's worth spending money on your tools. If you don't need new tools, then no, it may not be. But with a range of $1500-2800, I find it hard to take your crit seriously. My last rMBP cost $2500 and had less capacity than these, so I don't really see the beef.
    It's not simply a choice of "do I need this tool?" The reason is that most already have a set of robust tools = our current Macs.  Now here comes Apple offering a new upgraded tool for sale. So one has gotta ask. What's the added value of the new?  What does it let me do new better or faster? Are there ways this new tool is actually worse? What am I gaining, what am I losing and how much will it cost me? It's more complex than buying a new tool. You may need it but you have to really think about how much of that need is just want. And what is the opportunity cost of spending say 3$K for a tool that lets me do the same stuff I can do now marginally better. That's my personal view anyway. I'm not disrespecting yours. 
    Just read the Tech Specs to see whether these are "marginally better" or "significantly better". Just to name one, the difference between NVMe SSD and SATA SSD is not marginal but significant.
  • Reply 60 of 92
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,890member
    StanW said:
    For the money I have found that the MacBook Air is the better choice. I know that Apple will be no longer be making this laptop but I as well as my family have purchased 4 and love everyone of them. For what we need a laptop for you can't beat them. I don't mind a less sharper screen. I do mind that the new Pros and MacBooks do not support USB items without an adapter. The Air is still very fast. I mean how fast do you really need to open a program? I think Apple has lost their way with customer needs and satisfaction. This is from a person that has had and still have Apple products for 30 years.

    Why do you compare a Macbook Air to a MBP? If you don't need to drive two 5K monitors at once then the Macbook Air is good for you. That doesn't mean that Apple has lost their way because Macbook Air is enough for you
    The MBP without touchbar is essentially what should have been the new MBA, but it is at a much, much higher price. So not a replacement at all.
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