Apple's corporate reputation in slow decline, market research suggests

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 78
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,250member
    slurpy said:
    "perceived corporate reputation"

    What the fuck does this even mean? Is it connected to a single specific aspect? If so, which? What horse-shit. 

    But hey, I guess people need to find something new to frame Apple's "decline", since they can't with things like brand equity, sales, profits, revenues, stock price, or customer satisfaction, no matter how hard they try. 
    It means exactly what it says. The reputation of a corporation as perceived by those who were sureveyed (or whose opinions were sought). 

    Why is that so complicated!?
    There are ways to ask questions (survey questions) that might focus responders on aspects thought to be of importance to the surveyor.  And this would then represent bias on the part of the surveyor which would then weigh upon the conclusion.  And since we already see plenty of myopic viewpoints expressed by analysts and the media, which are undoubtedly consumed by many, potentially even by those performing this survey, it is not without some basis that one would suspect the methodology used.
    Of course it has biases. So what? Most surveys do. 

    The only issue is whether the methodology is consistent through time. If it is -- and I am assuming it is, since your reporting does not suggest otherwise -- I believe it has information content. Would it matter if Apple had gone from, say, 10 to 12? In my view, that would have been irrelevant. 10 to 20? Yes, I think it is saying something that Apple may need to pay attention to. 
    edited March 2017 brucemc
  • Reply 42 of 78
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,402moderator
    slurpy said:
    "perceived corporate reputation"

    What the fuck does this even mean? Is it connected to a single specific aspect? If so, which? What horse-shit. 

    But hey, I guess people need to find something new to frame Apple's "decline", since they can't with things like brand equity, sales, profits, revenues, stock price, or customer satisfaction, no matter how hard they try. 
    It means exactly what it says. The reputation of a corporation as perceived by those who were sureveyed (or whose opinions were sought). 

    Why is that so complicated!?
    There are ways to ask questions (survey questions) that might focus responders on aspects thought to be of importance to the surveyor.  And this would then represent bias on the part of the surveyor which would then weigh upon the conclusion.  And since we already see plenty of myopic viewpoints expressed by analysts and the media, which are undoubtedly consumed by many, potentially even by those performing this survey, it is not without some basis that one would suspect the methodology used.
    Of course it has biases. So what? Most surveys do. 

    The only issue is whether the methodology is consistent through time. If it is -- and I am assuming it is, since your reporting does not suggest otherwise -- I believe it has information content. Would it matter if Apple had gone from, say, 10 to 12? In my view, that would have been irrelevant. 10 to 20? Yes, I think it is saying something that Apple may need to pay attention to. 
    I'm not sure that's correct, to say the only issue is whether the methodology is consistent through time.  What if the methodology were measuring something other than reputation all along?  
  • Reply 43 of 78
    flabber said:
    Not very surprising, looking at the lack of hardware updates in that department: the MacBook Pro only got an update late last year, but no new iMacs, Mac Pro's or Mac Minis. Partly because of Intel's lack of progress I guess, but still. They also apparently are discontinuing the Airport Extreme, OS X Server appears to be getting less and less interesting... all in all, I think that the (semi)pro-market needs some well deserved attention.

    And not one of those things would move the needle on Apple's reputation with the general population.  Or do you think Rolex is at the top because of the awesome new products they rolled out to huge publicity at CES?
    brucemcradarthekatretrogustochia
  • Reply 44 of 78
    adm1 said:
    As a corporation, I think Apple may well have took a hit to its reputation with the tax case over here in the EU and the outspoken Tim Cook's views in the US. Not personally bothered by either but I have heard and read plenty of criticism on both fronts.

    Excellent point.  Apple didn't have a reputation as a tax cheat 10 years ago when they weren't the biggest fish in the pond.  I don't agree with that narrative, but it's out there, and affects "reputation."
    radarthekat
  • Reply 45 of 78
    JoeSpitzakJoeSpitzak Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    I think it has some to do with Cook emphasizing political position over technology. I sold the modest amount of stock which I owned for many years.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 46 of 78
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,786member
    mj web said:
    I've been losing respect for Apple's output, products, and creativity for many years now, as noted in this forum. I tossed an Apple sticker in the trash the other day and wistfully recalled an earlier time when I proudly displayed that sticker on the rear window in my Mercedes Benz. Must admit I'm still long AAPL, for greedy reason, and I even bought a MBP yesterday, because it was heavily discounted, but I've lost a lot of respect -- and affection -- for Apple.
    You had to mention your Mercedes Benz.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 47 of 78
    technotechno Posts: 732member
    Maybe because Apple has become such a behemoth in the same way as Microsoft did 15+ years ago that they are incapable of radical innovation and have been caught and passed by it's competitors. Which in many way is not surprising as it is the way of natural selection. Are Apple likely to risk sales of the iPhone for a radical new design / device which might flop, of course not. Given where they are these days they are never going to be that innovative company like when Steve Jobs returned who had to otherwise they would have gone bust. ...
    Wow! I can't believe it took 15 posts before Steve Jobs was mentioned. I was sure it would be the first.
    randominternetpersonchiaStrangeDays
  • Reply 48 of 78
    tbstephtbsteph Posts: 93member
    Apple has overtly supported several controversial social issues that has likely not enamored them with a significant part of their user base. Personally, I would hope they focus more on their core business and stay out of political issues. 
    elijahgpatchythepirate
  • Reply 49 of 78
    Well, if you want to talk about corporate views... here are three topics of discussions to get things started...
    • Servers with hardware RAID. Apple used to manufacture Xserve then stopped leaving mac minis and imacs, not ideal at all.
    • OSX server, apple configurator (1 and 2) and profile manager are an afterthought more than solid products. Don't take it from me, read the forums and see how upset people are about their flaws and limitation.
    • Apple Classroom was a step in the right direction but came late when many school moved away... (see the Los angeles' Apple Debacle online).
    I could go on.
  • Reply 50 of 78
    I just wish they would listen to customers a bit more.  They are letting good profitable product lines like the Mac Pro and Mac Mini wither.  The Macbooks and iMacs have become increasingly un-upgradable and unserviceable.    They have lagged with product innovations and been a follower instead of a leader.  Still their eco-system and products are solid, so they will continue to do well.
  • Reply 51 of 78
    nubusnubus Posts: 96member
    Well, if you want to talk about corporate views... here are three topics of discussions to get things started...
    There is a difference between corporate reputation and reputation with corporations. This is about Apple dropping in reputation with all customers. Tax issues, lack of innovation (on the Mac and iPad), extreme pricing (in part due to currency), attacking customers for years in court, and more. 2016 wasn't the year of great headlines.

    The brand value of Apple is declining, and the only action to date is a 25% cut on the cost of dongles. 
  • Reply 52 of 78
    apmillerapmiller Posts: 35member
    I agree with Entropys. Although a huge Apple product fan for 30 years, I'm increasingly baffled by their corporate decisions, from a customer satisfaction standpoint. For example: Ever increasing premium prices (Ex. 2016 MacBooks) while usually tech decreases in price over a 5 yr period. Dropping of ports, and features (What?? My wife's iPhone 7 earbuds don't have a volume/mute control?? - to name a discovery last week. You've got to be kidding!) 1TB fusion drive downgrade to paltry 24GB flash. etc. etc. etc.); increasingly difficult to upgrade later or take apart. No Mac Pro upgrade in years. No low cost entry level machine upgrade in years (Mini). The list could go on and on, but most of you are well aware. One of the wealthiest corporations in the world, yet they continue go gouge the customer whenever they can (I know... keeping the investors happy, but ONLY them). How could satisfaction NOT go down?
    elijahgnubus
  • Reply 53 of 78
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,496member
    tbsteph said:
    Apple has overtly supported several controversial social issues that has likely not enamored them with a significant part of their user base. Personally, I would hope they focus more on their core business and stay out of political issues. 
    I think the same. Cook has been alienating fairly significant parts of Apple's customer base just so he can placate the small minority who support his SJW position; causing an overall net reduction in reputation. If he kept his mouth shut yes he wouldn't get a few brownie points  from the left (re/pro)gressives, but he wouldn't piss off the much larger base of centerists. I think gay rights etc are important, but I do not like how Cook goes about proclaiming "we at Apple support <liberal agenda>". Not all his employees will support that position, so that's actually misrepresentation. If he said "I support <liberal agenda>" then fine, but he doesn't. 
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 54 of 78
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,496member
    Oh apparently can't edit posts anymore. That's good, thanks AI. 

    Somewhat offtopic pic but why is it when AI posts a politically centred piece, comments are banned and we have to go to a different forum category that no one frequents to post? What's the difference between posting in the special category, and posting in the comments on the article? It's a pretty stupid, it's just a category. 
  • Reply 55 of 78
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 900member
    techno said:
    Maybe because Apple has become such a behemoth in the same way as Microsoft did 15+ years ago that they are incapable of radical innovation and have been caught and passed by it's competitors. Which in many way is not surprising as it is the way of natural selection. Are Apple likely to risk sales of the iPhone for a radical new design / device which might flop, of course not. Given where they are these days they are never going to be that innovative company like when Steve Jobs returned who had to otherwise they would have gone bust. ...
    Wow! I can't believe it took 15 posts before Steve Jobs was mentioned. I was sure it would be the first.
    I know. I was waiting for "This never would have happened if Steve were still alive!"
  • Reply 56 of 78
    asterionasterion Posts: 109member
    The words "bait" and "click" spring to mind...
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 57 of 78
    apmiller said:
    I agree with Entropys. Although a huge Apple product fan for 30 years, I'm increasingly baffled by their corporate decisions, from a customer satisfaction standpoint. For example: Ever increasing premium prices (Ex. 2016 MacBooks) while usually tech decreases in price over a 5 yr period. Dropping of ports, and features (What?? My wife's iPhone 7 earbuds don't have a volume/mute control?? - to name a discovery last week. You've got to be kidding!) 1TB fusion drive downgrade to paltry 24GB flash. etc. etc. etc.); increasingly difficult to upgrade later or take apart. No Mac Pro upgrade in years. No low cost entry level machine upgrade in years (Mini). The list could go on and on, but most of you are well aware. One of the wealthiest corporations in the world, yet they continue go gouge the customer whenever they can (I know... keeping the investors happy, but ONLY them). How could satisfaction NOT go down?

    What are you talking about?  I went to the Apple site to confirm: the earbuds that come with the iPhone 7 still have the same controls/mic on the cable that they've had for years.  Or are you talking about AirPods which are completely separate product (and aren't "iPhone 7 earbuds)?

    Is customer satisfaction down?  I doubt it, and this reputation survey doesn't shed any light on that. 

    StrangeDays
  • Reply 58 of 78
    nubus said:
    Well, if you want to talk about corporate views... here are three topics of discussions to get things started...
    There is a difference between corporate reputation and reputation with corporations. This is about Apple dropping in reputation with all customers. Tax issues, lack of innovation (on the Mac and iPad), extreme pricing (in part due to currency), attacking customers for years in court, and more. 2016 wasn't the year of great headlines.

    The brand value of Apple is declining, and the only action to date is a 25% cut on the cost of dongles. 

    Which customers are Apple "attacking in court"?  I can't think of any such cases.

  • Reply 59 of 78
    "9. Rolls-Royce "
    Yeah... I can see that. Rich hobbyst car. Reputation built by support - not car quality. The similar brand is Laborghini: handles fall off from car but hype is around. Do not even compare to Porsche regardless how cult the car might be that you think.
  • Reply 60 of 78
    nubusnubus Posts: 96member

    Which customers are Apple "attacking in court"?  I can't think of any such cases.

    It was covered on AI in December. Apple lost after 3 years in the courts. They lost once, pushed harder, and lost again. This started in 2013 - the same year Apple lost a major battle against EU about warranties. These issues could have been closed. Instead they are hurting the reputation.
    elijahg
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