Editorial: The mysterious curse of iPhone 6, lifted with... the headphone jack

24

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 79
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 2,213member
    I was one of those who were not pleased with Apple dropping the headphone jack. I thought dropping the headphone jack was a big mistake because I'd seen a succession of really bad BT devices, mice, keyboards, headphones and earbuds, that dropped connection randomly and continuously. I just did not trust the technology. I did noit think it was ready for prime time. And I did not think there was a NEED to drop the headphone jack. It worked fine.

    Fast Forward around three years.

    First my SE still has a headphone jack. I'm still using my wired ear buds on occasion. The issue hasn't hit me yet.
    However something else has come up. I don't know if BT has gotten better or what, but I'm seeing fewer problems. My BT MagicMouse and MagicKeyboard have been rock solid. We connected my phone to the car stereo system with BT on our trips last summer and it never missed a beat.  I picked up a little BT Sony Speaker for my iPad and it has worked great. The iPad has a headphone jack but I haven't used it in several months. I'm thinking I can now trust BT to work reliably, something I would not do a few years ago. Also because of the BT speaker I use with the iPad, my wired headphones are now semi permanently connected to my iMac. I don't think I'll ever go back to using them in the field. 

    So things have changed since Apple dropped the headphone jack. I've come around to feeling like I can trust the connection. In a couple or three years when my SE is due for replacement, my new iPhone will not have a headphone jack. I'll be fine with that. I'll find a set of BT ear buds and they'll do what I need. Time, and technology, marches on.

    And once again Apple was ahead of the curve.
    racerhomie3kruegduderadarthekatpscooter63watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 22 of 79
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    DAalseth said:
    I was one of those who were not pleased with Apple dropping the headphone jack. I thought dropping the headphone jack was a big mistake because I'd seen a succession of really bad BT devices, mice, keyboards, headphones and earbuds, that dropped connection randomly and continuously. I just did not trust the technology. I did noit think it was ready for prime time. And I did not think there was a NEED to drop the headphone jack. It worked fine.

    Fast Forward around three years.

    First my SE still has a headphone jack. I'm still using my wired ear buds on occasion. The issue hasn't hit me yet.
    However something else has come up. I don't know if BT has gotten better or what, but I'm seeing fewer problems. My BT MagicMouse and MagicKeyboard have been rock solid. We connected my phone to the car stereo system with BT on our trips last summer and it never missed a beat.  I picked up a little BT Sony Speaker for my iPad and it has worked great. The iPad has a headphone jack but I haven't used it in several months. I'm thinking I can now trust BT to work reliably, something I would not do a few years ago. Also because of the BT speaker I use with the iPad, my wired headphones are now semi permanently connected to my iMac. I don't think I'll ever go back to using them in the field. 

    So things have changed since Apple dropped the headphone jack. I've come around to feeling like I can trust the connection. In a couple or three years when my SE is due for replacement, my new iPhone will not have a headphone jack. I'll be fine with that. I'll find a set of BT ear buds and they'll do what I need. Time, and technology, marches on.

    And once again Apple was ahead of the curve.
    1) That's still not an issue because it comes with an adapter. You plug in onto your headphones and keep it there. It's the firmest fit for a 3.5mm jack I've ever experienced so I doubt there's an argument that it easily falls off. Getting an extra 3" on your headphones cable is probably beneficial to many, as is the little extra weight at the end which really helps keeps cords from tangling since they can't scrunch up and tangle as easily.

    2) BT has been great for many years, but it all depends on the devices. Apple really changed the game with their W1 chip—it's too bad the AirPods are uncomfortable for me. I hope they offer an in-ear or bone conducting option in the future.
    2old4funJWSCnetmagebb-15watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 23 of 79
    NotsofastNotsofast Posts: 450member
    As others have pointed out,  please consider changing the picture so we don't have to have politics injected into every single thing.  Most people come to tech sites to get away from the politics.  Your articles are interestingly provacotive about tech and inserting political controversy needlessly detracts from that and needlessly alienates people.  The national debate is so poisonous and divisive, it would be great if it didn't creep in here as well.  Thanks Dan.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 24 of 79
    Is anyone out there still pissed off that Apple was the first to remove floppy drives? I know I am!!! ;)
    yoyo2222SoliJWSClkruppradarthekatbb-15pscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 79
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    DAalseth said:
    I was one of those who were not pleased with Apple dropping the headphone jack. I thought dropping the headphone jack was a big mistake because I'd seen a succession of really bad BT devices, mice, keyboards, headphones and earbuds, that dropped connection randomly and continuously. I just did not trust the technology. I did noit think it was ready for prime time. And I did not think there was a NEED to drop the headphone jack. It worked fine.

    Fast Forward around three years.

    First my SE still has a headphone jack. I'm still using my wired ear buds on occasion. The issue hasn't hit me yet.
    However something else has come up. I don't know if BT has gotten better or what, but I'm seeing fewer problems. My BT MagicMouse and MagicKeyboard have been rock solid. We connected my phone to the car stereo system with BT on our trips last summer and it never missed a beat.  I picked up a little BT Sony Speaker for my iPad and it has worked great. The iPad has a headphone jack but I haven't used it in several months. I'm thinking I can now trust BT to work reliably, something I would not do a few years ago. Also because of the BT speaker I use with the iPad, my wired headphones are now semi permanently connected to my iMac. I don't think I'll ever go back to using them in the field. 

    So things have changed since Apple dropped the headphone jack. I've come around to feeling like I can trust the connection. In a couple or three years when my SE is due for replacement, my new iPhone will not have a headphone jack. I'll be fine with that. I'll find a set of BT ear buds and they'll do what I need. Time, and technology, marches on.

    And once again Apple was ahead of the curve.
    I have always been a proponent of dropping the headphone jack. In fact I use an SE with the Lightning adapter, even though it has a headphone jack. I prefer it to plugging my old EarPods into the headphone jack, as it's easier to connect and disconnect.

    That said, a lot of the concerns about loss of universal compatibility did pan out. I don't travel with the Lightning adapter, because there's always a risk of losing something I don't use while traveling. And while traveling, I want universal compatibility, starting with the airline entertainment system, to watching a movie on my MacBook on a train, or plugging into someone else's, or public, devices. In fact I was in an airport boutique recently looking at the new Beats Lightning headphones, which have silicone ear gels to seal out external sound, thinking how nice they would be for travel, but I was presented with a conundrum -- buy the latest technology compatible only with my phone, and have no way to use them on my MacBook (as there's still inexplicably no adapter for them), or anything else -- including the inflight entertainment system which was my immediate concern. I could buy the 3.5mm version, but that somehow seems like a step backward, as it still necessitates needing an adapter for my otherwise primary use with the iPhone.

    So there's a few more years to go before this all gets sorted out. The AirPods are definitely a future consideration for me for daily use. But again, I have concerns with them when traveling because they aren't universally compatible, and the potential for loss when I'm not always using them. I keep thinking I'm going to figure out a BT transmitter dongle solution to plug into 3.5mm jacks and use with AirPods on airplanes, and elsewhere, but it's just more tech to carry and keep track of, keep charged; and just grabbing my old EarPods is simply easier as I pack at the last minute for a trip, and I know they'll work with everything.

    But I still stand behind the removal of the headphone jack on the iPhone -- it is the future, even if it means I'll simply have to be better prepared in the interim. The integration between something like AirPods, my iPhone, Mac, iPad, Apple TV and watch is just too convenient to ignore. BT still limits audio quality, but that's a short term problem -- and it's currently good enough for most uses and situations, and most people. The prospect of using a mobile device without wires is simply too intoxicating. The iPhone X gets us 95% of the way there. I never understood why people (like yourself at the time ;-) didn't get that. Now the rest of the world just needs to catch up to Apple!
    Soliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 79
    yoyo2222yoyo2222 Posts: 144member
    mike1 said:
    For what it’s worth, I bought a 6 a month after the launch that was problem free until the day I traded it in for an X. 
    Likewise. My old 6 has been passed along first to my wife and then to her sister. It's still running like a champ.
    baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 79
    kruegdudekruegdude Posts: 340member

    I still see a lot of confusion over this.

    Lightning is 100% digital. There's no pass-through that lets analog audio go through the Lightning port to your headphones. The Lightning headphones have a miniature D/A converter and amplifier built right into the connector. That's why it's physically larger (though not by much). The Lightning to 3.5mm adaptor also has a built-in D/A converter and amplifier. That's why selling it for $9 at the beginning made it such a bargain - it's not a traditional adapter and actually has a lot of tech packed into its connector.
    This line of discussion, including the original comment, confuses me. Why are we even talking analog as it relates to a digital storage device? There is no analog audio stored on the device. It’s all 1’s and 0’s.
    radarthekatbb-15
  • Reply 28 of 79
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 1,186member
    johnsma22 said:
    Is anyone out there still pissed off that Apple was the first to remove floppy drives? I know I am!!! ;)
    I was outraged when the original Macintosh did away with the 5 1/4” floppy!   😁
    radarthekatbb-15watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 29 of 79
    Everything about dropping the headphone jack is a hassle. They tell me to get Bluetooth headphones and it’s a hassle to keep them charged—it’s enough work keeping the iPhone charged. They tell me to use the free adapter.... long lost—Along with three other expensive adapters that would allow me to listen and charge at the same time—another problem created with dropping the headphone adapter. They say that I should thank Apple because now my iPhone is more water resistant. Well thanks but I’ve managed to keep my phone out of the drink all these years. 
    I used to love the iPhone and upgraded every year. Not this year. I rolled my eyes and figured that I prefer an iPhone that I hate that is half paid off than another one I’d hate that have 2 years of payments. I’d like to switch away from the expensive hassle that the iPhone has become but I’m a slave to iTunes .... the apps and music I’ve purchased over the years .... iTunes— I just can’t seem to quit you. So I’ll guess I’ll just keep this 7plus until it dies .... I’ll save a boatload of money not upgrading every year as in the past. 
    baconstangaylk
  • Reply 30 of 79
    Love this:

    If the Verge were in charge of consumer technology, we'd be swimming in a sea of defective turds with headphone jacks, like the Nexus 7

    Daniel, thank you. I really look forward to your great articles.

    PS, didn’t notice what the iPhone screen said until somebody pointed it out.  Nice!

    PPS, I had a set of high fidelity corded earphones. I attached the adapter and gave it to my daughter.  Love the AirPods.
    edited March 2018 kruegdudewatto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 79
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    kruegdude said:
    I still see a lot of confusion over this.

    Lightning is 100% digital. There's no pass-through that lets analog audio go through the Lightning port to your headphones. The Lightning headphones have a miniature D/A converter and amplifier built right into the connector. That's why it's physically larger (though not by much). The Lightning to 3.5mm adaptor also has a built-in D/A converter and amplifier. That's why selling it for $9 at the beginning made it such a bargain - it's not a traditional adapter and actually has a lot of tech packed into its connector.
    This line of discussion, including the original comment, confuses me. Why are we even talking analog as it relates to a digital storage device? There is no analog audio stored on the device. It’s all 1’s and 0’s.
    There are connectors that allow for digital and analog data to be transmitted. It was possible—it still is—for Apple to push analog over Lightning with a DAC and ADC in-line with the control chip being smart enough to switch between transmission types as needed. While I don't think that will happen, there is at least one DAC and ADC is every iPhone for the built-in speakers and mics, so it's at least plausible if the engineering costs and consolidation of components are in Apple's favor since they will always need to have analog audio output and input in these devices.
    edited March 2018 baconstangmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 79
    erwanerwan Posts: 2member
    Hi, I don’t come to AppleInsider to read brainwashed articles or bogus cult thoughts but to get real news or insights. Maybe that was my last, I’ll stick to other sources. 
    baconstangaylk
  • Reply 33 of 79
    netmagenetmage Posts: 314member
    Soli said:
    kruegdude said:
    I still see a lot of confusion over this.

    Lightning is 100% digital. There's no pass-through that lets analog audio go through the Lightning port to your headphones. The Lightning headphones have a miniature D/A converter and amplifier built right into the connector. That's why it's physically larger (though not by much). The Lightning to 3.5mm adaptor also has a built-in D/A converter and amplifier. That's why selling it for $9 at the beginning made it such a bargain - it's not a traditional adapter and actually has a lot of tech packed into its connector.
    This line of discussion, including the original comment, confuses me. Why are we even talking analog as it relates to a digital storage device? There is no analog audio stored on the device. It’s all 1’s and 0’s.
    There are connectors that allow for digital and analog data to be transmitted.
     in fact, the Apple 30-pin connection was one that handled bith digital (USB, audio) and analog (audio) at the same time, but Apple decided to ditch analog for an all digital future and while they have had issues with it (mediocre HDMI) it is future proof.

    This line of discussion is because the article is entirely incorrect in a couple of places concerning Lightning and analog audio:
    In the interim, Apple could continue to deliver analog audio signals over pins of the existing Lighting port, which unlike the ancient minijack was designed specifically to accommodate water resistance. 
    Obviously it wouldn't work if Lightning were "a purely digital connection." 
    Actually, obviously it would work if you did the digital to analog conversion in the adapter.
    edited March 2018 mac_128
  • Reply 34 of 79
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,389member
    johnsma22 said:
    Is anyone out there still pissed off that Apple was the first to remove floppy drives? I know I am!!! ;)
    Yes as well as the Apple Serial Ports (ADB). Shame on Apple for moving forward and pushing customers to also do so!!!! If Steve were here....oh wait! /s
    radarthekatwatto_cobraanomejony0
  • Reply 35 of 79
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 2,213member
    Soli said:.

    2) BT has been great for many years, but it all depends on the devices. Apple really changed the game with their W1 chip—it's too bad the AirPods are uncomfortable for me. I hope they offer an in-ear or bone conducting option in the future.
    Agreed on the trouble with AirPods. They just don’t work for some of us.
    baconstang
  • Reply 36 of 79
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,038member

    The reality that Apple tests against is not how much or how loud bloggers can scream in capital letters.

    It's tied more closely to how much users can benefit in the future from a change that might seem disruptive in the present.

    This courage of conviction previously enabled Apple to move away from floppy disks, optical drives, spinning disk storage and a long line of legacy ports that each resulted in dramatic fit thrown by people who didn't understand where things were going, and who were only fixated on continuing their status quo while refusing to accept solutions that involved any slight bit of inconvenience.

    Fortunately for the rest of us, Apple keeps ignoring these troglodytes.
    As usual Mr. Dilger saved the best for last.
    kruegduderadarthekatpscooter63watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 37 of 79
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,038member
    erwan said:
    Hi, I don’t come to AppleInsider to read brainwashed articles or bogus cult thoughts but to get real news or insights. Maybe that was my last, I’ll stick to other sources. 
    Be my guest. If all you want to read is negative articles and comments about Apple there are several sites out there. Try MacRumors.com for starters..
    edited March 2018 radarthekatStrangeDaysroundaboutnowbrucemcbb-15pscooter63watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 38 of 79
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    Wow!   That covered a LOT of territory....   My thoughts on two things it touched on:
    1)  1st Generation curses:   That's very close to what an IT company I worked for for 20 years used as their guiding philosophy:   They became very successful avoiding bleeding edge technology in favor of 2nd generation technology because -- 2nd gen was not only cheaper it had been debugged...

    That said:  Apple has largely broken that approach:  Partly because they introduce new products that are so amazingly attractive that people are willing to take the risk (even risk averse me!).  And, partly because of their legendary quality, people realize that they aren't being used as guinea pigs to debug a new product.

    2) "Understanding a customer doesn't always require listening to them":   As a systems analyst designing new systems, I learned that quickly...   You had to look below the surface of the immediate need and desire to determine where they needed to go.  But, Steve took that to a whole new level and said it even better:  "How does a customer know what they need if they haven't seen it yet?" 
    The often cited reference by Steve is from Gretzky, ``I skate where the puck will be, not where it has been.''
    lkruppbb-15pscooter63
  • Reply 39 of 79
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,605member
    netmage said:
    Soli said:
    kruegdude said:
    I still see a lot of confusion over this.

    Lightning is 100% digital. There's no pass-through that lets analog audio go through the Lightning port to your headphones. The Lightning headphones have a miniature D/A converter and amplifier built right into the connector. That's why it's physically larger (though not by much). The Lightning to 3.5mm adaptor also has a built-in D/A converter and amplifier. That's why selling it for $9 at the beginning made it such a bargain - it's not a traditional adapter and actually has a lot of tech packed into its connector.
    This line of discussion, including the original comment, confuses me. Why are we even talking analog as it relates to a digital storage device? There is no analog audio stored on the device. It’s all 1’s and 0’s.
    There are connectors that allow for digital and analog data to be transmitted.
     in fact, the Apple 30-pin connection was one that handled bith digital (USB, audio) and analog (audio) at the same time, but Apple decided to ditch analog for an all digital future and while they have had issues with it (mediocre HDMI) it is future proof.

    This line of discussion is because the article is entirely incorrect in a couple of places concerning Lightning and analog audio:
    In the interim, Apple could continue to deliver analog audio signals over pins of the existing Lighting port, which unlike the ancient minijack was designed specifically to accommodate water resistance. 
    Obviously it wouldn't work if Lightning were "a purely digital connection." 
    Actually, obviously it would work if you did the digital to analog conversion in the adapter.
    Yes. The other thing never mentioned is that Apple used a non standard arrangement for the connectors in the analogue headphone port. So you wouldn’t get full functionality with your earphones from Xiaomi, for example.  You couldn’t control the volume from the in line controller on a lot on non Apple earphones. Not sure if this is fixed with the lightning DA adapter or not.
    aylk
  • Reply 40 of 79
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,050member
    macbootx said:
    If the Verge were in charge of consumer technology, we'd be swimming in a sea of defective turds with headphone jacks, like the Nexus 7

     :D 
    That quote is brilliant...lol
    watto_cobra
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