TRAI anti-spam app rules could force iPhones off Indian phone networks

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?

    That may cause "undesirable" results!!! Indian politicians are more than capable of misleading the Indian people and make sure to get the majority to vote in their favor. People are not intelligent enough to choose the right leaders during voting, isn't it? Apple will weigh the pros and cons of this and other dealings with Indian government and choose what is best for Apple stakeholders. Nothing wrong in it either way - Both allowing the App to the app store or reject the app outright. Even if Apple allowed the App to the app store, people need to install and use it for them to be screwed, right? And whoever installs such an App and use it - deserves to be screwed anyway.

  • Reply 22 of 32
    goofy1958goofy1958 Posts: 145member

    I find it funny that the country where most of the spam calls we get here in the U.S. come from, wants to force Apple to allow the app that at first glance, does appear that they want to spy on their people.  There is no reason to allow access to call logs.  I find it very hard to believe that they don't know who these companies are over there that cause most of the spam calls.

    I have AT&T with the Call Protect app that identifies spam and telemarketers without violating any Apple rules (free to use!).  I can then choose to block that number.  I do wonder why India's government can't program it the same way?  Or maybe they really do want to spy on their people.

  • Reply 23 of 32
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,237member
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?
    You mean the way the current administration is taking settled law and decisions on the environment and throwing them out without asking the voters, which overwhelmingly disagree?
    muthuk_vanalingamSpamSandwich
  • Reply 24 of 32
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,237member
    melgross said:
    So far, we haven’t seen the Indian government being that interested in tracking its people as the Chinese have. While it’s a crazy country, politically (though ours is getting closer right now) when compared to most western countries, it’s a democratic one, though with its own problems. But the rule of law there varies considerably depending in which state you live in. I do believe the government is doing something that they believe will help. 
    I am from India, so I will make a brief comment on this. The current government DOES believe in Chinese way of a surveillance state and trying its best to bring in various laws that would enable them to create a surveillance state. Hopefully it gets voted out in next year's polls, else we will be fast tracked into a surveillance state in the next decade.
    Well, I admit this is the first I’ve heard of that, and I read the India Times most days.
  • Reply 25 of 32
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,237member
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?

    That may cause "undesirable" results!!! Indian politicians are more than capable of misleading the Indian people and make sure to get the majority to vote in their favor. People are not intelligent enough to choose the right leaders during voting, isn't it? Apple will weigh the pros and cons of this and other dealings with Indian government and choose what is best for Apple stakeholders. Nothing wrong in it either way - Both allowing the App to the app store or reject the app outright. Even if Apple allowed the App to the app store, people need to install and use it for them to be screwed, right? And whoever installs such an App and use it - deserves to be screwed anyway.

    That’s the way I feel about it too. But Apple doesn’t want to set a precedent. It’s a slippery slope. What happens if they allow that, and the government then decides that not enough people are downloading it, and require Apple to install it in all phones and iPads? Other companies as well. Then what if they decide that not enough people are turning it on and using it, and force that issue too? Where does it end?
  • Reply 26 of 32
    melgross said:
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?

    That may cause "undesirable" results!!! Indian politicians are more than capable of misleading the Indian people and make sure to get the majority to vote in their favor. People are not intelligent enough to choose the right leaders during voting, isn't it? Apple will weigh the pros and cons of this and other dealings with Indian government and choose what is best for Apple stakeholders. Nothing wrong in it either way - Both allowing the App to the app store or reject the app outright. Even if Apple allowed the App to the app store, people need to install and use it for them to be screwed, right? And whoever installs such an App and use it - deserves to be screwed anyway.

    That’s the way I feel about it too. But Apple doesn’t want to set a precedent. It’s a slippery slope. What happens if they allow that, and the government then decides that not enough people are downloading it, and require Apple to install it in all phones and iPads? Other companies as well. Then what if they decide that not enough people are turning it on and using it, and force that issue too? Where does it end?
    Yes, you are right. Indian government has just taken the first step, in a series of well planned steps. So better for apple to reject it in the first step itself instead of setting up a bad precedent. 
  • Reply 27 of 32
    melgross said:
    melgross said:
    So far, we haven’t seen the Indian government being that interested in tracking its people as the Chinese have. While it’s a crazy country, politically (though ours is getting closer right now) when compared to most western countries, it’s a democratic one, though with its own problems. But the rule of law there varies considerably depending in which state you live in. I do believe the government is doing something that they believe will help. 
    I am from India, so I will make a brief comment on this. The current government DOES believe in Chinese way of a surveillance state and trying its best to bring in various laws that would enable them to create a surveillance state. Hopefully it gets voted out in next year's polls, else we will be fast tracked into a surveillance state in the next decade.
    Well, I admit this is the first I’ve heard of that, and I read the India Times most days.
    Just Google about "Aadhaar linking", you will get to see what current Indian government is up to. 
  • Reply 28 of 32
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    melgross said:
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?
    You mean the way the current administration is taking settled law and decisions on the environment and throwing them out without asking the voters, which overwhelmingly disagree?
    We're talking about India, Mel. Not the US. And the US is not a democracy. Never has been. It's a constitutional republic.

    I think the lesson here is:  Some countries in which the people believe they are living in a democracy... really are not. (This applies to the US and India, interestingly enough)
    edited July 2018 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 29 of 32
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,237member
    melgross said:
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?
    You mean the way the current administration is taking settled law and decisions on the environment and throwing them out without asking the voters, which overwhelmingly disagree?
    We're talking about India, Mel. Not the US. And the US is not a democracy. Never has been. It's a constitutional republic.

    I think the lesson here is:  Some countries in which the people believe they are living in a democracy... really are not. (This applies to the US and India, interestingly enough)
    Thank you for that. Yes I know we’re a republic. But exactly how often do we say that we;re a republic, rather than saying that we’re a democracy? Almost never. Hopefully, most people do know this. But we say democracy to simply mean that we vote, and have a say (though with the present administration trying to take away as much of that as possibly, I’m not so sure these days).

    true democracy isn’t really possible once you get past the small city-state as in Ancient Greece. Though, possibly with future communications that are actually secure, if that’s possible, it could work. But it’s unlikely to happen.
    edited July 2018
  • Reply 30 of 32
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    melgross said:
    melgross said:
    What happened to India being the world’s largest “democracy”? Shouldn’t junk like this be put to a national vote?
    You mean the way the current administration is taking settled law and decisions on the environment and throwing them out without asking the voters, which overwhelmingly disagree?
    We're talking about India, Mel. Not the US. And the US is not a democracy. Never has been. It's a constitutional republic.

    I think the lesson here is:  Some countries in which the people believe they are living in a democracy... really are not. (This applies to the US and India, interestingly enough)
    Thank you for that. Yes I know we’re a republic. But exactly how often do we say that we;re a republic, rather than saying that we’re a democracy? Almost never. Hopefully, most people do know this. But we say democracy to simply mean that we vote, and have a say (though with the present administration trying to take away as much of that as possibly, I’m not so sure these days).

    true democracy isn’t really possible once you get past the small city-state as in Ancient Greece. Though, possibly with future communications that are actually secure, if that’s possible, it could work. But it’s unlikely to happen.
    This is getting pretty far off-topic and may contribute to getting the thread locked, but personally I make a point to never say the US is a democracy. I feel using that particular word contributes to an environment of unrealistic expectations.

    And as long as I choose to stay in the US, I’d not want it to be a direct democracy. I believe “majority rules” politics driven by a barely informed public would logically lead to policies which disfavor minority opinion and would significantly erode constitutionally protected individual rights. If the majority is “always right” then individuals wouldn’t matter.
    edited July 2018
  • Reply 31 of 32
    I use an app called Hiya for spam calls, it does catch some, and you can report others.
    They must be doing it the right way for it to get past Apple's strict rules, so it is possible.
  • Reply 32 of 32
    sreesree Posts: 144member
    melgross said:
    melgross said:
    So far, we haven’t seen the Indian government being that interested in tracking its people as the Chinese have. While it’s a crazy country, politically (though ours is getting closer right now) when compared to most western countries, it’s a democratic one, though with its own problems. But the rule of law there varies considerably depending in which state you live in. I do believe the government is doing something that they believe will help. 
    I am from India, so I will make a brief comment on this. The current government DOES believe in Chinese way of a surveillance state and trying its best to bring in various laws that would enable them to create a surveillance state. Hopefully it gets voted out in next year's polls, else we will be fast tracked into a surveillance state in the next decade.
    Well, I admit this is the first I’ve heard of that, and I read the India Times most days.
    Let's just say, it depends on who you ask.

    Muthu is obviously aligned with the political dispensation that is currently in the opposition (whose leader's only qualification is that he is the fourth generation of a single family that gets elected unopposed to the presidency of the party 'democratically' everytime /s). And Muthu has a problem with the democratic election of a leader who rose from the humble beginings of selling tea to becoming the prime minister of india. The hypocrisy in indian politics can get quite funny.
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