Apple's iPhone XS Max smashes Google's Pixel 3 in benchmark testing

12467

Comments

  • Reply 61 of 134
    What a surprise: Once again Apple’s product is  superior to Googles. 
    Love my iPhone XS Max.
    edited October 2018 claire1magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 62 of 134
    But why Siri sucks ? Why  Pixel do best job at taking pictures with single lens camera ? A smartphone should be "smart" not only good in benchmarks  :D
  • Reply 63 of 134
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,818member
    danvm said:
    dewme said:
    MacPro said:
    Copying and a 'good enough' approach to business will only get you so far!

    It shows the extraordinary effort Apple puts into every facet of the iPhone. From glass, software, chips, battery, cameras, antennas, etc., etc. 

    And, the syncing of everything across all my devices. 

    I will never have a Google, MS, Samsung, Amazon, or Facebook device in my home or service on my devices! :)

    I can't wait until Apple makes all my devices look "Anonymous" on the internet! 

    It's coming! :)

    You're in such a tiny minority, like one in a million.  The whole internet is Google's playground and Android OS overwhelmingly dominates.  Almost no one on the planet is concerned with personal privacy because almost everyone wants free services.  Paying for those free services with personal data is completely acceptable to billions of internet users.  Everyone believes Apple is missing out by not having eavesdropping/listening devices in every room.  I believe most consumers don't mind being spied upon.  It makes them feel important that someone is listening to their every word.
    'Android OS overwhelmingly dominates.'  .... Oh, I fell off my chair laughing.  Dominates in landfills, kids' basements and crackerjack toys maybe.
    Not to be too pointed, but you can use a search engine right? You do realize that Apple in 2018 only has between 12-15% of the market share in cell phones, right? Apple is good to keep around, but they are not an overall threat to the entire market, just like in computers. It is the illusion of competition to keep people buying things... There is a reason that Microsoft bailed Apple out when it almost went bankrupt by buying 30% of the stock. Microsoft and ABC need Apple around and they need their customers to think that they are an actual competitor. It's a marketing ploy, nothing more.
    Laughable.

    The same search engine would tell you that Apple is slurping up nearly 90% of smartphone profits. Would you rather have the world's large pile of paperclips or the world's largest pile of cash? Cash matters, profits matter. If Microsoft is only allowing Apple to survive to preserve an illusion of competition, as you claim, how do you explain Apple absolutely crushing any hope of Microsoft ever succeeding in the smartphone market?

    I do agree that Apple and Microsoft are no longer direct competitors, and haven't been since the iPhone transformed the entire computing industry worldwide. Personal computers from the PC-XT, to the Compaq 386, through generations of Pentiums, to the latest fully built out Core i9 gaming rigs moved workers away from typewriters, moved some gamers away from dedicated consoles, freed scientists and business analysts from waiting in queues for mainframe access, and allowed little Jimmy to send an electronic letter to grandma after he learned how to work around the claptrap inherent in Microsoft's software. All the while Microsoft went on to become enormously successful by slapping a $100 tax on every PC shipped with their operating system installed on it. PCs were all about humans adapting to follow the stringent requirements imposed by the PC and its operating system. It's sit-down, shut-up, and do what you're told if you want to be productive with the PC. The PC and its OS dictates the terms and conditions and users had no choice but to comply, using Microsoft's rules in the vast majority of cases. 


    The PC is one of the most adaptable devices ever created.  It is personal since I can use it in whatever I need, from example, gaming, productivity, business, and many others tasks.  Yes, you have to learn and adapt to an OS, but the same can be said for iOS or any other modern OS. 

    Then the iPhone happened.

    The iPhone is the most personal computing device ever created and along with its iPad and Apple Watch siblings has forever changed how the collective mass of humanity interacts with computers, information, recorded knowledge, photography, music, personal communication, social media, news, weather, travel information, entertainment, personal health regimens, and just about every other aspect of modern life of billions of people worldwide. The iPhone flipped the script. The computer adapts to you. You want it in your pocket? There it is. You want it always connected to the world? There it is. You want to talk to it? It talks back. You want it to serve you information, news, music, entertainment, your favorite novels? No problem. Anywhere. Anytime. On your terms, not the terms dictated by a desk anchor and the wizard programming the anchor.  Calling PCs "personal" was like calling early automobile's horseless carriages. We thought PCs were personal, but we were so naive, shortsighted, and ignorant. The iPhone made that reality abundantly clear.   


    The examples you have only show that the iPhone (and mobile devices before the iPhone) did was to put in the palm of your hand what PC's have done for years.  Both mobile devices as the iPhone and PC's, both are personal, one designed for the palm of your hand and the other designed for more complex tasks. 

    So yeah, Apple vs Microsoft is a moot point. One company had the Old Way almost all to itself, had us all by the short hairs, dictated its own terms and conditions with little regard to what we really wanted, and imposed a universal tax on its partners and customers. And then they lost, big time, and got slogged down in a tarpit of their own creation. Apple on the other hand, stripped of the burden of playing a game of someone else's making, threw out the Old Way and reinvented the core of the computing universe around truly personal computing, putting a supercomputer in your pocket that reacted to your every need.  The iPhone is today as close to being a man-made appendage to the human form as any device ever created by man. The Old Way, the way dominated by PCs, is not even on the same plane of existence as the iPhone. At some point the iPhone too will appear crude in form, but the functional precedent that it established for personal computing will only be eclipsed when the sensory based man-machine interaction models can be replaced by a more direct integration with the intellectual and cognitive organ perched between our ears.
    First, Apple didn't threw the "old way", since they still sell Mac's, a device that it's considered a PC.  Second, what Apple did didn't replace the "old way".  It just gave users another device where they can access some of the information and do some tasks they did in their PCs.  So I cannot said that and iPhone is better than the "old way" or vice versa.  Both have advantages and disadvantages. 
    For all of your defense of the PC, and I'm fine with that, it's certainly true that the ubiquity of smartphones is unequaled. The smartphone is also a much more egalitarian device, in use by virtually all in society, something that the PC never achieved.

    As for adaptability, smartphones have lead to an early grave for a great number of consumer devices that easily survived PC's. I don't think most people would ever have needed or worried about getting 10 hours of daily use out of their PC's, but that's become a typical use pattern for smartphones,
    edited October 2018 radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 64 of 134
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,818member

    Wow, this article has generated a lot of brand-new 1 post accounts.
    Cicadas?

    They crawl out of their basements, mate, crawl back down, and we don't have to see them for another 7 years.
    williamlondonchiaSpamSandwichStrangeDaysmagman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 65 of 134
    claire1claire1 Posts: 510unconfirmed, member
    denchiosa said:
    But why Siri sucks ? Why  Pixel do best job at taking pictures with single lens camera ? A smartphone should be "smart" not only good in benchmarks  :D
    If Siri sucks so do the wannabe Siris as they all aren't great at anything and some do some things better than others. None are superior yet.

    Pixel can't do dual sense techniques. It just can't.

    iPhone IS the smartphone. This category didn't exist before iPhone.

    One-post-moron see yourself out.>>>
    StrangeDaysmagman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 66 of 134
    gatorguy said:
    bb-15 said:
    saltyzip said:
    I'm sure all that extra performance makes Facebook, WhatsApp and phone calls rock, not!

    The value of speed in a smartphone includes; 1. Intensive games like Fortnite. 
    I think @ericthehalfbee is actually testing how much  better the gaming performance of Fornite is on his iPhone compared to a couple of other higher-end Android phones. 

    Nope. Don't really need to test Fortnite as Appleinsider already did that test between the XS Max and Note 9. No surprise, the XS Max was better (as the Note 9 dropped frames).

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/09/26/rematch-iphone-xs-versus-samsung-galaxy-note-9-for-fortnite-gaming

    Besides, it's irrelevant. There's no way to truly quantify if a processor is faster on a certain game. Games can and do modify things like image details depending on device performance, so while they may run at the same speed (or same FPS) the visual quality will be different, making the results subjective. How do you assign a performance number to a difference in image quality?

    To really test performance you need to perform tasks where the completion time can be measured. Like rendering a video, applying complex effects to a photo or recalculating a complex spreadsheet.
    radarthekatStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 67 of 134
    I still want to see a video that times opening, in sequence, all the “same” apps on each phone (twice) like we used to get every year. Like, start the same game on each and when it’s ready to play move on to rendering out the same video on each device, and then on to the next app, etc. 
    I'm certain EverythingApplePro did that on Youtube
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 68 of 134
    croprcropr Posts: 944member
    gmgravytrain said:
    You're in such a tiny minority, like one in a million.  The whole internet is Google's playground and Android OS overwhelmingly dominates.  Almost no one on the planet is concerned with personal privacy because almost everyone wants free services.  Paying for those free services with personal data is completely acceptable to billions of internet users.  Everyone believes Apple is missing out by not having eavesdropping/listening devices in every room.  I believe most consumers don't mind being spied upon.  It makes them feel important that someone is listening to their every word.

    Bullshit. Android dominates because most people in the world can’t afford anything else, not because some supposed belief that people don’t care about being spied on. 
    In Western Europe people have definitely enough money to buy the most expensive smartphone, and yet the market share of the iPhone is less than 20% in most European countries, so your claim is at least partially incorrect.      Maybe a lot of people are smart enough to look at their actual use pattern, realizing that they don't need to have the latest and greatest and that a 300 Euro Android phone is more than good enough.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 69 of 134
    danvmdanvm Posts: 758member
    tmay said:
    danvm said:
    dewme said:
    MacPro said:
    Copying and a 'good enough' approach to business will only get you so far!

    It shows the extraordinary effort Apple puts into every facet of the iPhone. From glass, software, chips, battery, cameras, antennas, etc., etc. 

    And, the syncing of everything across all my devices. 

    I will never have a Google, MS, Samsung, Amazon, or Facebook device in my home or service on my devices! :)

    I can't wait until Apple makes all my devices look "Anonymous" on the internet! 

    It's coming! :)

    You're in such a tiny minority, like one in a million.  The whole internet is Google's playground and Android OS overwhelmingly dominates.  Almost no one on the planet is concerned with personal privacy because almost everyone wants free services.  Paying for those free services with personal data is completely acceptable to billions of internet users.  Everyone believes Apple is missing out by not having eavesdropping/listening devices in every room.  I believe most consumers don't mind being spied upon.  It makes them feel important that someone is listening to their every word.
    'Android OS overwhelmingly dominates.'  .... Oh, I fell off my chair laughing.  Dominates in landfills, kids' basements and crackerjack toys maybe.
    Not to be too pointed, but you can use a search engine right? You do realize that Apple in 2018 only has between 12-15% of the market share in cell phones, right? Apple is good to keep around, but they are not an overall threat to the entire market, just like in computers. It is the illusion of competition to keep people buying things... There is a reason that Microsoft bailed Apple out when it almost went bankrupt by buying 30% of the stock. Microsoft and ABC need Apple around and they need their customers to think that they are an actual competitor. It's a marketing ploy, nothing more.
    Laughable.

    The same search engine would tell you that Apple is slurping up nearly 90% of smartphone profits. Would you rather have the world's large pile of paperclips or the world's largest pile of cash? Cash matters, profits matter. If Microsoft is only allowing Apple to survive to preserve an illusion of competition, as you claim, how do you explain Apple absolutely crushing any hope of Microsoft ever succeeding in the smartphone market?

    I do agree that Apple and Microsoft are no longer direct competitors, and haven't been since the iPhone transformed the entire computing industry worldwide. Personal computers from the PC-XT, to the Compaq 386, through generations of Pentiums, to the latest fully built out Core i9 gaming rigs moved workers away from typewriters, moved some gamers away from dedicated consoles, freed scientists and business analysts from waiting in queues for mainframe access, and allowed little Jimmy to send an electronic letter to grandma after he learned how to work around the claptrap inherent in Microsoft's software. All the while Microsoft went on to become enormously successful by slapping a $100 tax on every PC shipped with their operating system installed on it. PCs were all about humans adapting to follow the stringent requirements imposed by the PC and its operating system. It's sit-down, shut-up, and do what you're told if you want to be productive with the PC. The PC and its OS dictates the terms and conditions and users had no choice but to comply, using Microsoft's rules in the vast majority of cases. 


    The PC is one of the most adaptable devices ever created.  It is personal since I can use it in whatever I need, from example, gaming, productivity, business, and many others tasks.  Yes, you have to learn and adapt to an OS, but the same can be said for iOS or any other modern OS. 

    Then the iPhone happened.

    The iPhone is the most personal computing device ever created and along with its iPad and Apple Watch siblings has forever changed how the collective mass of humanity interacts with computers, information, recorded knowledge, photography, music, personal communication, social media, news, weather, travel information, entertainment, personal health regimens, and just about every other aspect of modern life of billions of people worldwide. The iPhone flipped the script. The computer adapts to you. You want it in your pocket? There it is. You want it always connected to the world? There it is. You want to talk to it? It talks back. You want it to serve you information, news, music, entertainment, your favorite novels? No problem. Anywhere. Anytime. On your terms, not the terms dictated by a desk anchor and the wizard programming the anchor.  Calling PCs "personal" was like calling early automobile's horseless carriages. We thought PCs were personal, but we were so naive, shortsighted, and ignorant. The iPhone made that reality abundantly clear.   


    The examples you have only show that the iPhone (and mobile devices before the iPhone) did was to put in the palm of your hand what PC's have done for years.  Both mobile devices as the iPhone and PC's, both are personal, one designed for the palm of your hand and the other designed for more complex tasks. 

    So yeah, Apple vs Microsoft is a moot point. One company had the Old Way almost all to itself, had us all by the short hairs, dictated its own terms and conditions with little regard to what we really wanted, and imposed a universal tax on its partners and customers. And then they lost, big time, and got slogged down in a tarpit of their own creation. Apple on the other hand, stripped of the burden of playing a game of someone else's making, threw out the Old Way and reinvented the core of the computing universe around truly personal computing, putting a supercomputer in your pocket that reacted to your every need.  The iPhone is today as close to being a man-made appendage to the human form as any device ever created by man. The Old Way, the way dominated by PCs, is not even on the same plane of existence as the iPhone. At some point the iPhone too will appear crude in form, but the functional precedent that it established for personal computing will only be eclipsed when the sensory based man-machine interaction models can be replaced by a more direct integration with the intellectual and cognitive organ perched between our ears.
    First, Apple didn't threw the "old way", since they still sell Mac's, a device that it's considered a PC.  Second, what Apple did didn't replace the "old way".  It just gave users another device where they can access some of the information and do some tasks they did in their PCs.  So I cannot said that and iPhone is better than the "old way" or vice versa.  Both have advantages and disadvantages. 
    For all of your defense of the PC, and I'm fine with that, it's certainly true that the ubiquity of smartphones is unequaled. The smartphone is also a much more egalitarian device, in use by virtually all in society, something that the PC never achieved.

    My post didn't had the purpose to defend to PC.  I just pointed out how the versatility of PC's is what makes them personal.  For example, you mention that "stringent requirements imposed by the PC and its operating system. It's sit-down, shut-up, and do what you're told if you want to be productive with the PC. The PC and its OS dictates the terms and conditions and users had no choice but to comply, using Microsoft's rules in the vast majority of cases."  These lines easily applies to an iPad, a device you mention it was as personal as a smartphone.  The iPad requires and force the user to interact with a touch UI and touch apps, even with a keyboard installed.  The user has to sit-down, shut-up, and do what Apple says if you want to be productive with an iPad.  So I suppose the iPad isn't a personal device, right?

    As for adaptability, smartphones have lead to an early grave for a great number of consumer devices that easily survived PC's. I don't think most people would ever have needed or worried about getting 10 hours of daily use out of their PC's, but that's become a typical use pattern for smartphones,
    PC's are adaptable, but not mobile, and that's a big advantage for smartphones.  And there is a long list of people that needs 8-10 hours of their PC's.  Just ask a developer, architect, engineer, or even an student. 

    williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 70 of 134
    indyfxindyfx Posts: 319member
    foggyhill said:
    I still want to see a video that times opening, in sequence, all the “same” apps on each phone (twice) like we used to get every year. 
    Their not the "same", you have a huge dependency on how shitty the current release is, and if they're actually doing the same thing on startup.
    There is a hell of a lot of setup that's done on startup of an app and assuming it's the same between releases and OS's is not wise.
    For example, if on IOS/Android you could do a lot of things up front that you can't in Android (and vice versa), it would be penalized using this kind of things.

    That's why you have to go for benchmarks where you actually know they're actually mostly doing the same small tasks and you have access to the source code.
    Except it shows good real world examples of how fast using each phone is. Like someone mentioned in another thread, it doesn’t matter if your car can go over 200 mph when you’re driving it around town.  
    The poster "in the other thread" sounds like someone who hasen't actually driven a car that can go over 200MPH. Nope, even around town the feel of "nearly instantly responsive" has real benefits.
    radarthekatStrangeDaysmagman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 71 of 134
    danvm said:

    "My post didn't had the purpose to defend to PC..."
    Are you kidding?! Having installed yourself as the resident Microsoft/PC apologist, *that's all you ever do*. It's really fucking annoying, btw, and you've been told this numerous times by numerous people, we're not stupid and neither are you, so you can stop the innocent act.
    radarthekatStrangeDaysmagman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 72 of 134
    indyfx said:
    foggyhill said:
    I still want to see a video that times opening, in sequence, all the “same” apps on each phone (twice) like we used to get every year. 
    Their not the "same", you have a huge dependency on how shitty the current release is, and if they're actually doing the same thing on startup.
    There is a hell of a lot of setup that's done on startup of an app and assuming it's the same between releases and OS's is not wise.
    For example, if on IOS/Android you could do a lot of things up front that you can't in Android (and vice versa), it would be penalized using this kind of things.

    That's why you have to go for benchmarks where you actually know they're actually mostly doing the same small tasks and you have access to the source code.
    Except it shows good real world examples of how fast using each phone is. Like someone mentioned in another thread, it doesn’t matter if your car can go over 200 mph when you’re driving it around town.  
    The poster "in the other thread" sounds like someone who hasen't actually driven a car that can go over 200MPH. Nope, even around town the feel of "nearly instantly responsive" has real benefits.
    Maybe, but I have driven a several that can go over 200 mph and can confirm with you that top speed and acceleration are different things and cars that can not hit 200 mph can be nearly instantly responsive. So, I’m not sure what you’re getting at. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 73 of 134
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,748member
    gatorguy said:
    bb-15 said:
    saltyzip said:
    I'm sure all that extra performance makes Facebook, WhatsApp and phone calls rock, not!

    The value of speed in a smartphone includes; 1. Intensive games like Fortnite. 
    I think @ericthehalfbee is actually testing how much  better the gaming performance of Fornite is on his iPhone compared to a couple of other higher-end Android phones. 

    To really test performance you need to perform tasks where the completion time can be measured. Like rendering a video, applying complex effects to a photo or recalculating a complex spreadsheet.
    But you have no way of comparing those as you've said before and you were the one that offered to if presented with some other apps that COULD be tested.  I offered two that my son knew both he and his friends have played in competitions on both Android and iOS. I'm no gamer myself, nor someone who would do their photo processing on a smartphone for that matter.

    No doubt there may be some smallish percentage of users like you who really do their "complex photo processing" on their smartphone or do "complex spreadsheet computations" on one, but wouldn't gaming  be a far more common use (perhaps THE most common use based on app store revenues) and and a more insightful comparison? Personally I think it would be a great real-life everyday measuring stick. Just my .02

    But if you can't compare 'em yourself,  fair enough. While AI found the X and Note were a toss-up (thanks for that link) the dropped frames on the Note compared to the XS is certainly a plus in Apple's favor. 

    EDIT: A cursory look on YouTube indicates game loading on Battlefields and Fortnite is much faster on the XS compared to the Galaxy, and by a significant amount. Game play itself is reported as pretty much on par with each other. But again I'm no gamer so cannot comment from personal experience. 

    edited October 2018 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 74 of 134
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,818member
    Danvm,

    You attributed this to me, though it isn't my statement;

    "For example, you mention that "stringent requirements imposed by the PC and its operating system. It's sit-down, shut-up, and do what you're told if you want to be productive with the PC. The PC and its OS dictates the terms and conditions and users had no choice but to comply, using Microsoft's rules in the vast majority of cases."  These lines easily applies to an iPad, a device you mention it was as personal as a smartphone.  The iPad requires and force the user to interact with a touch UI and touch apps, even with a keyboard installed.  The user has to sit-down, shut-up, and do what Apple says if you want to be productive with an iPad.  So I suppose the iPad isn't a personal device, right?"


    edited October 2018 williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 75 of 134
    ihatescreennames said:

     Like someone mentioned in another thread, it doesn’t matter if your car can go over 200 mph when you’re driving it around town.  

    Except that it does matter, in several ways. First and foremost, it directly translates into efficiency and power management,

    If processor A is twice as fast as processor S, then when loads occur processor A only spends half the time running at full speed before its able to clock back down and return to efficiency mode. Or, depending on the task, processor S may need to run flat out to handle a sustained load that processor A can handle with half the effort. Which again translates into better battery life and improved performance.

    Either way, those short, quick, high intensity load cycles are much more common to most users than needing to race around running at full speed for extended periods of time.

    So going back to the car analogy, it may not seem to matter when you're just "driving around town", but when you arrive at your destination driving processor A you're going to end up having more gas left in the tank, all while having had a better, smoother user experience to boot.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobraradarthekat
  • Reply 76 of 134
    bb-15 said:
    saltyzip said:
    I'm sure all that extra performance makes Facebook, WhatsApp and phone calls rock, not!

    The value of speed in a smartphone includes; 1. Intensive games like Fortnite. 2. 4K video at high frame rates in which the latest iPhones lead the industry. 
    3. Sustained performance that lasts years, especially when Apple releases OS updates 5 years after release.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 77 of 134
    iPhone IS the smartphone. This category didn't exist before iPhone.

    One-post-moron see yourself out.>>>
    False.

    SAUCE: The first commercially available device that could be properly referred to as a "smartphone" began as a prototype called "Angler" developed by Frank Canova in 1992 while at IBM and demonstrated in November of that year at the COMDEX computer industry trade show.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartphone

    477 posts does not make you righteous
    edited October 2018 williamlondon
  • Reply 78 of 134
    danvmdanvm Posts: 758member
    danvm said:

    "My post didn't had the purpose to defend to PC..."
    Are you kidding?! Having installed yourself as the resident Microsoft/PC apologist, *that's all you ever do*. It's really fucking annoying, btw, and you've been told this numerous times by numerous people, we're not stupid and neither are you, so you can stop the innocent act.
    First of all, I consider myself a MS customer, not apologist.  And it's the same for Apple, I'm just a customer (btw, I'm posting this comment from my MBP 2017).  Since I have devices from both companies, and use them for extended periods of time, I can see the benefits and where they can do better.  I don't consider other posts or people in this forums stupid, as you said.  And while sometimes I disagree with some comments, I never respond in a disrespectful way.  

    Second, if you read my post, I mentioned that I consider the Mac a PC.  My comment was comparing PC's (Windows / Mac) with smartphones as devices.
    gatorguywilliamlondonmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 79 of 134
    bluefire1 said:
    What a surprise: Once again Apple’s product is  superior to Googles. 
    Love my iPhone XS Max.
    Yeah and it isnt even close. The gap is widening in Apple’s favour every year.  Best in class performance with best in class security/privacy.

    You want a great Google experience? Buy an iPhone and run all your Google apps. Actual privacy/security and Google supports iOS with its full suite of apps. You dont have to comprimise your data or be surveillanced in exchange for a free charging stand. 
    edited October 2018 Rayz2016StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 80 of 134
    tmay said:

    Wow, this article has generated a lot of brand-new 1 post accounts.
    Cicadas?

    They crawl out of their basements, mate, crawl back down, and we don't have to see them for another 7 years.
    If only we had to see the freshly birthed trolls but once every 7 years. Instead it’s every new Apple product launch or announcement. The butthurt. 
    chaseyoboywilliamlondonwatto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.