LG will roll out out AirPlay 2 and HomeKit to 2019 smart TVs on Thursday

Posted:
in General Discussion
AirPlay 2 and HomeKit will start arriving on LG smart televisions starting Thursday, the South Korean electronics giant has confirmed, with Apple's streaming and smart home platforms able to interact with the firm's 2019 range of TVs.




First announced in January and recently tipped to launch in the near future, LG on Wednesday advised an update to its 2019 AI TV lineup will be starting July 25. The firmware update will be available for the 2019 LG OLED TVs, NanoCell TVs, and Ultra HD televisions with ThinQ AI capability.

LG claims the rollout will make it the first global TV manufacturer to support HomeKit. When connected to Apple's smart home framework, users will be able to control basic TV functions including power, volume, and source, via the Home app and Siri commands from iPhones and iPads, and can even be controlled via scenes and automations along with other HomeKit accessories.

The AirPlay 2 support enables content from iOS devices and macOS to be streamed to the television directly, without requiring an Apple TV as an intermediary. Video, music, and podcasts can be streamed to the TV as well as other AirPlay 2-compatible speakers at the same time.

"LG remains at the forefront of TV technological innovation because of our never-ending quest to deliver the best home viewing experience," said Brian Kwon, president LG Mobile Communications and Home Entertainment companies. "With Apple AirPlay 2 and HomeKit support, we are demonstrating our commitment to offering consumer benefits that go beyond just best-in-class picture quality."

The update will start rolling out to supported televisions in more than 140 countries starting Thursday, and is expected to complete within a few weeks.

LG won't be the only vendor to sell televisions compatible with HomeKit and AirPlay 2. Vizio has pledged support for AirPlay 2 and HomeKit, while Samsung introduced AirPlay 2 and the Apple TV app to its televisions in May.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,567member
    This actually might make it possible for my elderly family members to use Apple TV. The current system of switching sources manually is too much for them.  Will this new TV have a mic and will you be able to speak to Siri through it? Or do they also have to buy a HomePod?
    edited July 2019 caladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 22
    In case anyone is confused: No one with an Apple TV should care.

    - I can AirPlay to my Apple TV, but who really does this anymore? Frankly it is a bit old fashioned at this point. 99% of what I would AirPlay can be natively played back on Apple TV, and easier than even before with new Siri commands.
    - My TV turns on and off with the Apple TV via CEC.
    - My volume control is all universal via CEC/HDMI-ARC and controlled from the iOS Remote App/Remote Widget/Apple Watch, or the Siri Remote itself (bluetooth not IR).
    - Switching inputs also happens automatically via CEC, but I rarely switch inputs anyway because the Apple TV is the main driver.

    AirPlay and HomeKit coming to the TV's themselves is a good thing, but only for certain use cases. It does not apply to anyone already using an Apple TV. I feel like this has to be mentioned because I see a lot of confused people trying to find a way that this applies to them.
    dv8orAppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 22
    glee217glee217 Posts: 15member
    In case anyone is confused: No one with an Apple TV should care.

    - I can AirPlay to my Apple TV, but who really does this anymore? Frankly it is a bit old fashioned at this point. 99% of what I would AirPlay can be natively played back on Apple TV, and easier than even before with new Siri commands.
    - My TV turns on and off with the Apple TV via CEC.
    - My volume control is all universal via CEC/HDMI-ARC and controlled from the iOS Remote App/Remote Widget/Apple Watch, or the Siri Remote itself (bluetooth not IR).
    - Switching inputs also happens automatically via CEC, but I rarely switch inputs anyway because the Apple TV is the main driver.

    AirPlay and HomeKit coming to the TV's themselves is a good thing, but only for certain use cases. It does not apply to anyone already using an Apple TV. I feel like this has to be mentioned because I see a lot of confused people trying to find a way that this applies to them.
    Do you know if a tv with airplay 2 can use a homepod as a speaker/soundbar? If not the I guess the ios/mac device can airplay to both tv and homepod simultaneously with airplay 2. 
    dv8orcaladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 22
    A bit off topic, but......

    Speaking of TV updates, My Sony TV (powered by Android) just prompted me last night to do another update.

    I posted about this before. I SPECIFICALLY turned off WiFi on the TV. I also turned off the fucking ridiculous "Allow Google to scan for WiFi networks even when WiFi is off" selection. Yet when I checked my TV the WiFi toggle was back on (it had to be, otherwise how would it know there's an update).

    I'm really fucking pissed that Google/Android seems to think it's OK to keep re-enabling my WiFi even though I turn it off. Disgusting fucking company.

    /rant
    dv8orblah64mac_dogStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 22
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    A bit off topic, but......

    Speaking of TV updates, My Sony TV (powered by Android) just prompted me last night to do another update.

    I posted about this before. I SPECIFICALLY turned off WiFi on the TV. I also turned off the fucking ridiculous "Allow Google to scan for WiFi networks even when WiFi is off" selection. Yet when I checked my TV the WiFi toggle was back on (it had to be, otherwise how would it know there's an update).

    I'm really fucking pissed that Google/Android seems to think it's OK to keep re-enabling my WiFi even though I turn it off. Disgusting fucking company.

    /rant
    Deja Vu.

    Someone posted this exact complaint a few months ago. It's just how Google rolls.

    I'm sure you-know-who will be here to explain why it's no reason to worry.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 22
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member
    This actually might make it possible for my elderly family members to use Apple TV. The current system of switching sources manually is too much for them.  Will this new TV have a mic and will you be able to speak to Siri through it? Or do they also have to buy a HomePod?
    You just need a harmony remote, one button can easily set up all your AV equipment to watch what ever source you want at the time. 

    Also your phone can act as the remote to the ATV as well as Siri search request for the ATV I do it all the time. I never use the ATV remote I use either harmony remote or the phone or iPad in the room. That simple.
  • Reply 7 of 22
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,093member
    In case anyone is confused: No one with an Apple TV should care.

    - I can AirPlay to my Apple TV, but who really does this anymore? Frankly it is a bit old fashioned at this point. 99% of what I would AirPlay can be natively played back on Apple TV, and easier than even before with new Siri commands.
    - My TV turns on and off with the Apple TV via CEC.
    - My volume control is all universal via CEC/HDMI-ARC and controlled from the iOS Remote App/Remote Widget/Apple Watch, or the Siri Remote itself (bluetooth not IR).
    - Switching inputs also happens automatically via CEC, but I rarely switch inputs anyway because the Apple TV is the main driver.

    AirPlay and HomeKit coming to the TV's themselves is a good thing, but only for certain use cases. It does not apply to anyone already using an Apple TV. I feel like this has to be mentioned because I see a lot of confused people trying to find a way that this applies to them.
    Some providers don't have channels on AppleTV.  We constantly have to play certain videos from our iPhones to our AppleTV.  
    space2001watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 22
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,093member
    In order to use HomeKit, one has to have a HomeKit Hub.  That means either an AppleTV or an iPad that generally never leaves the house.  Are TV makers like these incorporating that ability?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 22
    blah64blah64 Posts: 993member
    A bit off topic, but......

    Speaking of TV updates, My Sony TV (powered by Android) just prompted me last night to do another update.

    I posted about this before. I SPECIFICALLY turned off WiFi on the TV. I also turned off the fucking ridiculous "Allow Google to scan for WiFi networks even when WiFi is off" selection. Yet when I checked my TV the WiFi toggle was back on (it had to be, otherwise how would it know there's an update).

    I'm really fucking pissed that Google/Android seems to think it's OK to keep re-enabling my WiFi even though I turn it off. Disgusting fucking company.

    /rant

    Did you actually let your android TV connect to your WiFi at some point?  Otherwise, it wouldn't have known your network credentials, couldn't have gotten onto your network even if it did sneak around behind your back to re-enable WiFi.  Seems like it's time to change your WiFi password, because you simply cannot control your TV.

    I know you're a savvy guy (and it sounds like in this case even you made a mistake here), but in general people are remarkably naive about "smart" devices, whether TVs, doorbell cameras, or any of a number of different types of devices.  There are great use cases for devices that have smarts built into them, but most of them should never be allowed to connect to the internet unrestricted because there's no way to know what they're doing, let alone constrain them, once they're connected. 

    This doesn't even touch on the fact that because these devices are actually internet-connected computers, they are all at risk of being hacked; malware being installed; being used by criminals in attacks on other computers or networks, like banks, military targets, internet infrastructure; 3rd party spyware being installed (beyond the spyware that's pre-installed), etc.

    "Smart" TVs are among the worst of the IoT devices.  Read this:
    and continue to spread the word.  Every post like this means more people are nudged to learn more, and the only way to stop this stuff from taking over is for people to be educated.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 22
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 1,069member
    A bit off topic, but......

    Speaking of TV updates, My Sony TV (powered by Android) just prompted me last night to do another update.

    I posted about this before. I SPECIFICALLY turned off WiFi on the TV. I also turned off the fucking ridiculous "Allow Google to scan for WiFi networks even when WiFi is off" selection. Yet when I checked my TV the WiFi toggle was back on (it had to be, otherwise how would it know there's an update).

    I'm really fucking pissed that Google/Android seems to think it's OK to keep re-enabling my WiFi even though I turn it off. Disgusting fucking company.

    /rant
    And, to add insult to injury, how much of your data is being uploaded to who know how many companies AND Sony? Fuck smart tv. Just another way for your data to be harvested without your consent. 
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,865member
    In case anyone is confused: No one with an Apple TV should care.

    - I can AirPlay to my Apple TV, but who really does this anymore? Frankly it is a bit old fashioned at this point. 99% of what I would AirPlay can be natively played back on Apple TV, and easier than even before with new Siri commands.
    We routinely AirPlay photos and videos from our iphones to to our ATV. That’s the prime use case.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,865member
    This actually might make it possible for my elderly family members to use Apple TV. The current system of switching sources manually is too much for them.
    My older plasma TV automatically turns on and switches sources to either the Apple TV or Sony BD player when they are powered on. It’s real easy. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 22
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,384member
    A bit off topic, but......

    Speaking of TV updates, My Sony TV (powered by Android) just prompted me last night to do another update.

    I posted about this before. I SPECIFICALLY turned off WiFi on the TV. I also turned off the fucking ridiculous "Allow Google to scan for WiFi networks even when WiFi is off" selection. Yet when I checked my TV the WiFi toggle was back on (it had to be, otherwise how would it know there's an update).

    I'm really fucking pissed that Google/Android seems to think it's OK to keep re-enabling my WiFi even though I turn it off. Disgusting fucking company.

    /rant
    Should be a teachable moment. Never buy an Android powered TV (or anything) again.
    edited July 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 22
    WgkruegerWgkrueger Posts: 352member
    blah64 said:
    A bit off topic, but......

    Speaking of TV updates, My Sony TV (powered by Android) just prompted me last night to do another update.

    I posted about this before. I SPECIFICALLY turned off WiFi on the TV. I also turned off the fucking ridiculous "Allow Google to scan for WiFi networks even when WiFi is off" selection. Yet when I checked my TV the WiFi toggle was back on (it had to be, otherwise how would it know there's an update).

    I'm really fucking pissed that Google/Android seems to think it's OK to keep re-enabling my WiFi even though I turn it off. Disgusting fucking company.

    /rant

    Did you actually let your android TV connect to your WiFi at some point?  Otherwise, it wouldn't have known your network credentials, couldn't have gotten onto your network even if it did sneak around behind your back to re-enable WiFi.  Seems like it's time to change your WiFi password, because you simply cannot control your TV.

    I know you're a savvy guy (and it sounds like in this case even you made a mistake here), but in general people are remarkably naive about "smart" devices, whether TVs, doorbell cameras, or any of a number of different types of devices.  There are great use cases for devices that have smarts built into them, but most of them should never be allowed to connect to the internet unrestricted because there's no way to know what they're doing, let alone constrain them, once they're connected. 

    This doesn't even touch on the fact that because these devices are actually internet-connected computers, they are all at risk of being hacked; malware being installed; being used by criminals in attacks on other computers or networks, like banks, military targets, internet infrastructure; 3rd party spyware being installed (beyond the spyware that's pre-installed), etc.

    "Smart" TVs are among the worst of the IoT devices.  Read this:
    and continue to spread the word.  Every post like this means more people are nudged to learn more, and the only way to stop this stuff from taking over is for people to be educated.

    Thanks. I had lost track of that link and wanted to send it to someone. It’s bookmarked so I’ll never ever loose track of it again, lol. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 22
    In case anyone is confused: No one with an Apple TV should care.

    - I can AirPlay to my Apple TV, but who really does this anymore? Frankly it is a bit old fashioned at this point. 99% of what I would AirPlay can be natively played back on Apple TV, and easier than even before with new Siri commands.
    We routinely AirPlay photos and videos from our iphones to to our ATV. That’s the prime use case.
    I just picked up a closeout 2018 40" Samsung 7 series for cheap for my in-laws. I was able to update the firmware to enable Airplay (which also installed the AppleTV app). Both in-laws have iPhones and an iPad Air 1 in the house, so I showed them Airplay of photos and videos to TV. What was nice was that Airplay automatically displayed content on TV without switching inputs. When Airplay stopped, it reverts back to TV. Way easier than if it was a separate ATV. Still no guarantee they'll remember how to do it...

    One thing I found was that iPhone did regular Airplay from Photos app via Share button (didn't try other apps yet), but iPad only did Airplay Mirroring from Control Center. The Photos app did not present Airplay from the Share button. Anyone have an idea why this is?

    This actually might make it possible for my elderly family members to use Apple TV. The current system of switching sources manually is too much for them.
    My older plasma TV automatically turns on and switches sources to either the Apple TV or Sony BD player when they are powered on. It’s real easy. 
    Thanks to CEC, the automatic turn on and input switch works well. The problem is that when you're done with ATV (or BD), you have to manually switch the input back to regular TV. Not a big deal for most people, but you might be surprised how difficult this is for some elderly folks like my dad and in-laws. Which is why the TVs built-in Airplay so much better.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 22
    For reference, I copied this from an earlier AI article (at least I think it was AI):

    By now, many of the ones that say "announced" are probably shipping. The older models can have firmware updated. I can vouch for the 7-series 2018 Samsung as being updatable---I just did one last week. 

    Airplay2 and Homekit:

    LG smart TVs

    • LG OLED (2019)Announced
    • LG NanoCell SM9X series (2019)Announced
    • LG NanoCell SM8X series (2019)Announced
    • LG UHD UM7X series (2019)Announced


    Sony Smart TVs

    • Sony Z9G Series (2019)Announced
    • Sony A9G Series (2019)Announced
    • Sony X950G Series (2019)Announced
    • Sony X850G Series (2019 85", 75", 65" and 55" models)Announced


    VIZIO smart tvs

    • Vizio P-Series Quantum (2019 and 2018)Announced
    • Vizio P-Series (2019, 2018 and 2017)Announced
    • Vizio M-Series (2019, 2018 and 2017)Announced
    • Vizio E-Series (2019, 2018 and 2017)Announced
    • Vizio D-series (2019, 2018 and 2017)Announced


    AirPlay 2 and the AppleTV app

    • Samsung QLED Series (2019 and 2018)Announced
    • Samsung 8 Series (2019 and 2018)Announced
    • Samsung 7 Series (2019 and 2018)Announced
    • Samsung 6 Series (2019 and 2018)Announced
    • Samsung 5 Series (2019 and 2018)Announced
    • Samsung 4 Series (2019 and 2018)Announced
    edited July 2019
  • Reply 17 of 22

    So is it getting harder and harder to buy a "dumb" TV now? I'd love to get a new Sony, but I want all the smarts to be coming from my Apple TV puck.

    This auto-enabling of WiFi mentioned by Ericthehalfbee is pretty scary.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 22
    Speaking of Airplay, Netflix has finally announced a mobile-only plan for India. That confirms the theory some had here that "casting" and Airplay to a TV was disabled in Netflix for this very reason.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 22
    focherfocher Posts: 687member
    I’m with those who would never connect their TV to my home network or give it Internet access.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 22
    captmarkcaptmark Posts: 41member
    While those of us who paid twice as much for the same TV in 2016, are again forgotten about by LG. Makes it hard for me to by another LG product if they can't even upgrade their 4 year old TVs?
    watto_cobra
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