Compared: Apple's iPhone 11 Pro Max versus the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 and 10+

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 44
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    The storage size wasn't mentioned at all? Is this not an important metric?

    For $1099 the iPhone gives you 64GB while the Note gives you 256GB, big difference when you can simultaneously shoot with 4K on multiple cameras.

    As for the screen, until the iPhone 11 came about, the Note was recognized as having the A+ screen.
    Then the Galaxy S11 will come out, and it will considered the best.

    Then the Note 11 and then the iPhone 12 will be top until the next Galaxy flagship or until the iPhone comes along with its new micro led screen perhaps, who knows? It's swings and roundabouts.

    To say any of the screens or cameras on any of these phones is significantly better than the other is rubbish really, they both have strengths and weaknesses.

    Personally, I'd want more memory on an iPhone, 4GB in 2019 flagship costing up to $1499 is just being cheap. Sure, iOS does better with less ram but it also seems to struggle keeping certain apps open in the background.

    Look what happened when apple threw a big battery in their new phones, instant battery god phone, why not double the memory, it wouldn't cost much and you'd make a lot of people happier, even 6GB would have made a difference.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CusxWlCsTfQ

    Anyway, both phones are great, choose the one you want.

    Galaxy displays suck compared to iPhone because they can't utilize Apple's display tech like True Tone.
    macplusplusStrangeDays
  • Reply 22 of 44
    While the iPhone 11 Pro Max has just 4 gigabytes of memory to work with, its six-core A13 Bionic therefore needs all the help it can get from the Neural Engine to properly compete. 
    As someone already said, Geekbench doesn't test the Neural Engine. In addition, the amount of memory doesn't affect the CPU performance at all.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 44
    PerunPerun Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    1. Loved the review! 2. A bit unfair not to mention the storage space on the phones - most of the people are in need of a bigger space, and this, off course has an impact on the price. I do not think that the comparison was done right in accordance to the prices vs. Gb on the phone. 3. What about the battery?
  • Reply 24 of 44
    Gator9422Gator9422 Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    Terrible comparison and this why using numbers off a spec sheet is meaningless (though the Android fans love spec sheets).

    For starters, no Android device display can touch the iPhone because Android has a horrible version of color management. Nobody can render content anywhere nearly as accurate as the iPhone. As to pixel count, both are so high nobody could ever tell the difference.

    The brightness spec is wrong. You can measure peak brightness in a small area of the screen or over the entire screen. Bottom line is the iPhone has the brighter screen and Samsung is playing with numbers when they quote 1,200 nits.

    Cameras? Try to record a video and switch between cameras during the video. The Note 10 often stutters and has to refocus when changing. The iPhone does this seamlessly.

    Just a couple obvious examples.
    Bro you do know Samsung makes the iPhone's display right? And the iPhone has the same contrast ratio as the Note lol. The Note has a Quad HD+ display and the iPhone doesn't plus the iPhone doesn't have a brighter screen it only hits 1200 nits while watching HDR content. Other than that I think the highest it hits is 900 nits when outdoors and Samsung hits around 1300 outdoors. 
    edited October 2019
  • Reply 25 of 44
    Gator9422Gator9422 Posts: 2unconfirmed, member


    Galaxy displays suck compared to iPhone because they can't utilize Apple's display tech like True Tone.
    Dude SAMSUNG MAKES THEIR DISPLAY.....lmaooooo so who's using who's technology? 
    bigtds
  • Reply 26 of 44
    BxBornBxBorn Posts: 74member
    I have the 11 Max as my personal phone and the Note 10+ for my work phone - you can't go wrong with either one. as an average user using it for everyday tasks there's not much difference between the two that would make me say which one is better. I do think for work the S-Pen is pretty useful - its def been handy on several occasions where someone stopped me in the hall for something and I was able to add a quick reminder or take down a name. However, the night mode on the 11 is pretty cool and useful as well so again, I couldn't pick one over the other...just a question which OS people are more comfortable with.
  • Reply 27 of 44
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,989member
    In the 1950s and 1960s it was the gearheads that argued and disparaged each other about specs (carburetors, transmissions, differentials, supercharged vs turbocharged). Now it’s CPUs, GPUs, RAM, LED vs OLED vs AMOLED, notches, bezels, batteries, you name it. There has to be something to fight over apparently and the idea of someone picking something other than what YOU deem superior is unbearable. That's the state of tech blogs these days. Apple is doomed, Samsung sucks, Google is evil, Facebook is the anti-christ, AT&T is dumb, Verizon hates its customers, Sprint is a joke, Beats are unlistenable. And the latest? The Card is useless because it all happens on the device and not on a traditional bank website. Oh, and it doesn’t mesh with Quicken. 
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member
    All the people commenting on this post are all stating opinions. I had every iPhone. I just switched to Android with the S10 plus, and I love it. It doesn't lag at all. It's smooth. And I enjoy being able to multitask and customize the phone to my liking, but all of this is opinions. I like iOS, but I don't like it as much as one ui. It's ok to like iPhone or Android. Phones these days are so good that it's all a matter of which opertaino system you like more. You can't say iOS is betreb than Android because that's an opinion not a fact. My phone has loaded apps faster than the new iPhone 11 pro max and I compared them side by side. Each phone has it's pro's and con's. It's a matter of your preference. Like I said before in my opinion I like being able to do what I want with my phone, and Android lets me do that that's why I like it more. 
    “But these are just opinions!”

    Of course a review is an opinion. All reviews everywhere, that’s so obvious and understood it needs no mentioning. But the point of visiting a review site (whether it be movies or phones) is to find an org with values you relate to. The problem with this comparison is it only compares specs and not the bigger part of the puzzle — the experience of using. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 44
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,615member
    lkrupp said:
    In the 1950s and 1960s it was the gearheads that argued and disparaged each other about specs (carburetors, transmissions, differentials, supercharged vs turbocharged). Now it’s CPUs, GPUs, RAM, LED vs OLED vs AMOLED, notches, bezels, batteries, you name it. There has to be something to fight over apparently and the idea of someone picking something other than what YOU deem superior is unbearable. That's the state of tech blogs these days. Apple is doomed, Samsung sucks, Google is evil, Facebook is the anti-christ, AT&T is dumb, Verizon hates its customers, Sprint is a joke, Beats are unlistenable. And the latest? The Card is useless because it all happens on the device and not on a traditional bank website. Oh, and it doesn’t mesh with Quicken
    I could care less where 'it all happens,' but for many people, myself included, not meshing with Quicken does make it useless. Or at least not useful.


    rf40928 said:
    When we read articles like this we realize this person doesn’t know very much... 


    Android apps run on Java and to get around this they need a virtual machine ( an emulator )... this is because android could run on different processors and running android apps on snapdragon wouldn’t be native code.  

    In English this means Android requires a lot more RAM to run as smoothly as the iPhone does — which runs code natively for apps ( without an emulator ) ... surprise surprise did we learn anything ?!  In this sense iOS is much more efficient with memory since there it needs no emulator and iOS Apps actually decide the memory allocated; yet for Android the memory is allocated by the o/s... because android has to constantly recycle and empty memory to free up...
    I never realized Android uses a virtual machine instead of native code. It kind of makes sense, though, since they have to make it run on devices from multiple manufacturers with potentially multiple different processors.

    Apple's closed ecosystem has some drawbacks, but this points out one of the advantages - by controlling the hardware Apple is able to keep everything consistent and achieve better performance and efficiency. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 44
    edited October 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member

    Samsung phones have always won awards for best display mainly because the resolution is higher. My phone has a higher resolution than the new iPhone. The iPhone only won best display this year (which is the only year it won)  because it gets brighter in doors. In my experience my S10 plus gets brighter with direct sunlight, but only by a small amount. 
    Wrong. Read the Display Mate review on why they awarded it. They spend a lot of time going over color accuracy and calibration. It’s the very first thing they mention. 

    http://www.displaymate.com/iPhone_11Pro_ShootOut_1P.htm

    ·   Highest  Absolute Color Accuracy  (0.9 JNCD)  –  Visually Indistinguishable From Perfect.

    ·  Smallest  Shift in Color Accuracy with the Image Content APL  (0.3 JNCD)  –  Visually Indistinguishable From Perfect.

    ·  Highest  Full Screen Brightness for OLED Smartphones  (770 nits for 100% APL and 821 nits for 50% APL).

    ·  Highest  Full Screen Contrast Rating in Ambient Light  (171 at 100% APL).

    ·  Highest  HDR Peak Brightness of 1,290 nits for standard HDR 20% APL, and 1,090 nits for Full Screen White with 100% APL.

    ·  Highest  Contrast Ratio  (Infinite).

    ·  Lowest  Screen Reflectance  (4.5 percent).

    ·  Smallest  Brightness Variation with Viewing Angle  (25% at 30 degrees).

    ·  Highest  Visible Screen Resolution 2.7K (2688x1242)  –  4K Does Not appear visually sharper on a Smartphone.

     

    edited October 2019 ericthehalfbeewatto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member

    Terrible comparison and this why using numbers off a spec sheet is meaningless (though the Android fans love spec sheets).

    For starters, no Android device display can touch the iPhone because Android has a horrible version of color management. Nobody can render content anywhere nearly as accurate as the iPhone. As to pixel count, both are so high nobody could ever tell the difference.

    The brightness spec is wrong. You can measure peak brightness in a small area of the screen or over the entire screen. Bottom line is the iPhone has the brighter screen and Samsung is playing with numbers when they quote 1,200 nits.

    Cameras? Try to record a video and switch between cameras during the video. The Note 10 often stutters and has to refocus when changing. The iPhone does this seamlessly.

    Just a couple obvious examples.
    What in the world this is so uneducated.

    1)How does Android have "terrible color management" first of all that is not even a real term and second actually compare a note 10 plus display to a iPhone 11 pro max display and you will see there is little difference in iPhones (inferior display) and the note 10 plus display espe5 when it comes to high quality her vidoe.

    2) Check displaymate before you make false ill-informed claims. I'll leave it at that and let realize your own stupidity.

    3) have you actually tried switching while recording because I just did it seamlessly on my note 10 plus.

    Nice to see ill-informed morons spread their "knowledge" to the world.

    Well, speaking of ignorance, you’ve put on quite a parade. Color management accuracy and indeed a thing. 

    And DisplayMate agrees, which is why they awarded the 11 as having the best, for whatever that is worth to you. 

    http://www.displaymate.com/iPhone_11Pro_ShootOut_1P.htm#Best_Award
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member
    The storage size wasn't mentioned at all? Is this not an important metric?

    For $1099 the iPhone gives you 64GB while the Note gives you 256GB, big difference when you can simultaneously shoot with 4K on multiple cameras.

    As for the screen, until the iPhone 11 came about, the Note was recognized as having the A+ screen.
    Then the Galaxy S11 will come out, and it will considered the best.

    Then the Note 11 and then the iPhone 12 will be top until the next Galaxy flagship or until the iPhone comes along with its new micro led screen perhaps, who knows? It's swings and roundabouts.

    To say any of the screens or cameras on any of these phones is significantly better than the other is rubbish really, they both have strengths and weaknesses.

    Personally, I'd want more memory on an iPhone, 4GB in 2019 flagship costing up to $1499 is just being cheap. Sure, iOS does better with less ram but it also seems to struggle keeping certain apps open in the background.

    Look what happened when apple threw a big battery in their new phones, instant battery god phone, why not double the memory, it wouldn't cost much and you'd make a lot of people happier, even 6GB would have made a difference.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CusxWlCsTfQ

    Anyway, both phones are great, choose the one you want.
    iPhone doesn’t need more RAM. Android knockoffs need the RAM because they’re less efficient due to their base system architecture and require more RAM to make up for it. 

    As for storage space for videos, basically irrelevant if you’re using iCloud Photos; and at 99-cents a month, you should be. Past few years I’ve had the entry-level 64GB model and use half to two-thirds of it, since photos, videos, music, and messages are all on the cloud and keep only pointers on the device if and when space runs low. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member

    Gator9422 said:
    Terrible comparison and this why using numbers off a spec sheet is meaningless (though the Android fans love spec sheets).

    For starters, no Android device display can touch the iPhone because Android has a horrible version of color management. Nobody can render content anywhere nearly as accurate as the iPhone. As to pixel count, both are so high nobody could ever tell the difference.

    The brightness spec is wrong. You can measure peak brightness in a small area of the screen or over the entire screen. Bottom line is the iPhone has the brighter screen and Samsung is playing with numbers when they quote 1,200 nits.

    Cameras? Try to record a video and switch between cameras during the video. The Note 10 often stutters and has to refocus when changing. The iPhone does this seamlessly.

    Just a couple obvious examples.
    Bro you do know Samsung makes the iPhone's display right? And the iPhone has the same contrast ratio as the Note lol. The Note has a Quad HD+ display and the iPhone doesn't plus the iPhone doesn't have a brighter screen it only hits 1200 nits while watching HDR content. Other than that I think the highest it hits is 900 nits when outdoors and Samsung hits around 1300 outdoors. 
    Of course we do. But unlike you knockoff folks, we also know that Apple hires Samsung to build their screens by spec, not off the shelf; and, that Apple produces its own, unique display driver to drive those displays. Thus they are not identical. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member

    Gator9422 said:


    Galaxy displays suck compared to iPhone because they can't utilize Apple's display tech like True Tone.
    Dude SAMSUNG MAKES THEIR DISPLAY.....lmaooooo so who's using who's technology? 
    Ah someone sent in the trolls. Ok, guy. So you’re claiming knockoffs like Samsung have True Tone?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 36 of 44
    AppleishAppleish Posts: 456member
    Your asterisk in 4GB* doesn't go anywhere.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 37 of 44
    snookiesnookie Posts: 113member
    Terrible comparison and this why using numbers off a spec sheet is meaningless (though the Android fans love spec sheets).

    For starters, no Android device display can touch the iPhone because Android has a horrible version of color management. Nobody can render content anywhere nearly as accurate as the iPhone. As to pixel count, both are so high nobody could ever tell the difference.

    The brightness spec is wrong. You can measure peak brightness in a small area of the screen or over the entire screen. Bottom line is the iPhone has the brighter screen and Samsung is playing with numbers when they quote 1,200 nits.

    Cameras? Try to record a video and switch between cameras during the video. The Note 10 often stutters and has to refocus when changing. The iPhone does this seamlessly.

    Just a couple obvious examples.
    What in the world this is so uneducated.

    1)How does Android have "terrible color management" first of all that is not even a real term and second actually compare a note 10 plus display to a iPhone 11 pro max display and you will see there is little difference in iPhones (inferior display) and the note 10 plus display espe5 when it comes to high quality her vidoe.

    2) Check displaymate before you make false ill-informed claims. I'll leave it at that and let realize your own stupidity.

    3) have you actually tried switching while recording because I just did it seamlessly on my note 10 plus.

    Nice to see ill-informed morons spread their "knowledge" to the world.

    Displaymate ranked the iPhone display better than the Samsung. You are dumb.  
    Color management is a thing.  But you are dumb.
    Run along now.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 38 of 44
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 1,263member
    Terrible comparison and this why using numbers off a spec sheet is meaningless (though the Android fans love spec sheets).

    For starters, no Android device display can touch the iPhone because Android has a horrible version of color management. Nobody can render content anywhere nearly as accurate as the iPhone. As to pixel count, both are so high nobody could ever tell the difference.

    The brightness spec is wrong. You can measure peak brightness in a small area of the screen or over the entire screen. Bottom line is the iPhone has the brighter screen and Samsung is playing with numbers when they quote 1,200 nits.

    Cameras? Try to record a video and switch between cameras during the video. The Note 10 often stutters and has to refocus when changing. The iPhone does this seamlessly.

    Just a couple obvious examples.
    What in the world this is so uneducated.

    1)How does Android have "terrible color management" first of all that is not even a real term and second actually compare a note 10 plus display to a iPhone 11 pro max display and you will see there is little difference in iPhones (inferior display) and the note 10 plus display espe5 when it comes to high quality her vidoe.

    2) Check displaymate before you make false ill-informed claims. I'll leave it at that and let realize your own stupidity.

    3) have you actually tried switching while recording because I just did it seamlessly on my note 10 plus.

    Nice to see ill-informed morons spread their "knowledge" to the world.

    The Galaxy Note 10 maintains the two standard color profiles, Natural and Vivid, for Android devices adopting Google’s color management system.


    Calling people morons doesn't make you smarter or more informed. B) I also read both of the Displaymate reviews of the Note 10+ and the 11 Max please include the text that states the Max's screen as being inferior?  We must have read different reviews I think?

    The experts at DisplayMate positively gushed about the quality of the iPhone 11 Pro Max display. They call the screen “almost certainly considerably better than your existing Smartphone, 4K UHD TV, Tablet, Laptop and computer monitor.”

    The crisp OLED screen in Apple’s newest flagship handset met or exceeded the test lab’s records in color accuracy, brightness, reflectance and more.










    edited October 2019 StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 39 of 44
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,166member
    The storage size wasn't mentioned at all? Is this not an important metric?

    For $1099 the iPhone gives you 64GB while the Note gives you 256GB, big difference when you can simultaneously shoot with 4K on multiple cameras.

    As for the screen, until the iPhone 11 came about, the Note was recognized as having the A+ screen.
    Then the Galaxy S11 will come out, and it will considered the best.

    Then the Note 11 and then the iPhone 12 will be top until the next Galaxy flagship or until the iPhone comes along with its new micro led screen perhaps, who knows? It's swings and roundabouts.

    To say any of the screens or cameras on any of these phones is significantly better than the other is rubbish really, they both have strengths and weaknesses.

    Personally, I'd want more memory on an iPhone, 4GB in 2019 flagship costing up to $1499 is just being cheap. Sure, iOS does better with less ram but it also seems to struggle keeping certain apps open in the background.

    Look what happened when apple threw a big battery in their new phones, instant battery god phone, why not double the memory, it wouldn't cost much and you'd make a lot of people happier, even 6GB would have made a difference.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CusxWlCsTfQ

    Anyway, both phones are great, choose the one you want.
    iPhone doesn’t need more RAM. Android knockoffs need the RAM because they’re less efficient due to their base system architecture and require more RAM to make up for it. 

    As for storage space for videos, basically irrelevant if you’re using iCloud Photos; and at 99-cents a month, you should be. Past few years I’ve had the entry-level 64GB model and use half to two-thirds of it, since photos, videos, music, and messages are all on the cloud and keep only pointers on the device if and when space runs low. 
    A problem for many people is they run short on local storage. AFAIK, content it isn't saved directly to the cloud. It goes local and then is shunted up to the cloud. The shunting costs many people money and the more you shunt, the more it costs over a data connection.

    And when people take more photos and videos is often away from home (no wi-fi).

    Either way, 64GB is now below what should be shipping as a base configuration on flagship phones in this category.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 40 of 44
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,014member
    avon b7 said:
    The storage size wasn't mentioned at all? Is this not an important metric?

    For $1099 the iPhone gives you 64GB while the Note gives you 256GB, big difference when you can simultaneously shoot with 4K on multiple cameras.

    As for the screen, until the iPhone 11 came about, the Note was recognized as having the A+ screen.
    Then the Galaxy S11 will come out, and it will considered the best.

    Then the Note 11 and then the iPhone 12 will be top until the next Galaxy flagship or until the iPhone comes along with its new micro led screen perhaps, who knows? It's swings and roundabouts.

    To say any of the screens or cameras on any of these phones is significantly better than the other is rubbish really, they both have strengths and weaknesses.

    Personally, I'd want more memory on an iPhone, 4GB in 2019 flagship costing up to $1499 is just being cheap. Sure, iOS does better with less ram but it also seems to struggle keeping certain apps open in the background.

    Look what happened when apple threw a big battery in their new phones, instant battery god phone, why not double the memory, it wouldn't cost much and you'd make a lot of people happier, even 6GB would have made a difference.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CusxWlCsTfQ

    Anyway, both phones are great, choose the one you want.
    iPhone doesn’t need more RAM. Android knockoffs need the RAM because they’re less efficient due to their base system architecture and require more RAM to make up for it. 

    As for storage space for videos, basically irrelevant if you’re using iCloud Photos; and at 99-cents a month, you should be. Past few years I’ve had the entry-level 64GB model and use half to two-thirds of it, since photos, videos, music, and messages are all on the cloud and keep only pointers on the device if and when space runs low. 
    A problem for many people is they run short on local storage. AFAIK, content it isn't saved directly to the cloud. It goes local and then is shunted up to the cloud. The shunting costs many people money and the more you shunt, the more it costs over a data connection.

    And when people take more photos and videos is often away from home (no wi-fi).

    Either way, 64GB is now below what should be shipping as a base configuration on flagship phones in this category.
    It's shot locally, synced to the cloud. When your device's space runs low iOS will delete older pictures, music, and apps, freeing up local space so you can continue filling it. You can control what is done via cellular. Most people with iPhones have wifi available to them at some point during the day, so your manufactured problem is not a problem in the real world. 

    And no, you're absolutely wrong, 64gb is definitely an appropriate place to begin. I'm using two-thirds of that currently -- the same as I have the past two years. Why should I have to pay for additional storage I don't need, thanks to how iCloud works? 

    I'll just chalk this up to you not knowing how iOS works.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.