Porsche offering stylish CarPlay kits for its vintage automobiles

Posted:
in General Discussion
Owners of vintage Porsche who also love the latest and greatest tech are in for a treat, as the carmaker will now offer official CarPlay kits for their classic vehicles. It's all the functionality you expect from CarPlay, but fits in with the retro dashboard of cars like the famous Porsche 911.

Use CarPlay in your Vintage Porsche
Use CarPlay in your Vintage Porsche


Classic vehicle collectors have always faced a difficult choice between keeping things original or going for third-party solutions when restoring their vehicles, and there is always the question of whether or not to add modern tech. Now Porsche has offered some clarity to those decisions with official CarPlay kits which utilize a new solution called "Porsche Classic Communication Managment" (PCCM).

Rather than dealing with an FM radio or old tape deck that might be more period-accurate but certainly isn't as useful as CarPlay, you now have the option of adding Apple's fully functional infotainment system. It's CarPlay complete with 3.5-inch touchscreen and Siri. Just as you would get with a modern car, Porsche's kit includes support for Bluetooth, USB connections, aux input, and even an SD slot. Fitting it to the car takes advantage of the old single-DIN format, making it simple to do.

The CarPlay kit blends in with Porsche's trim
The CarPlay kit blends in with Porsche's trim


The PCCM kit comes with knobs and buttons, adding to the vintage feel without interrupting the design of the trim too much. You'll be able to install this on any Porsche from a 1960s Porsche 911 to a 1990s Porsche 993. While Porsche hasn't given details of any other models, it has confirmed compatibility with what it vaguely describes as "earlier front- and mid-engine models."

For vehicles utilizing a double-din system, there is PCCM Plus, which is designed specifically for the Porsche 911 and Porsche 986 Boxster. The double-DIN gives better connection capabilities, so these classic vehicles get a slightly different kit that provides CarPlay on a larger 7-inch screen instead. PCCM Plus also supports Android Auto.

As reported by PistonHeads, the units will cost a pretty penny, not to mention you'll actually need to own one of these classic vehicles first. There are no US prices yet, since they are only for sale in Germany at the moment, but the regular PCCM cost the equivalent of $1,557 US, and the PCCM Plus is $1,738.

If that seems expensive for a car radio, you aren't a classic Porsche owner. To use the PCCM kit, you'll also need, $34,000 for a 1977 Porsche. Or perhaps you'd prefer spending just a little extra and getting a 1963 Porsche 911 for about $250,000. Alternatively, you can get CarPlay in a 2020 Honda Civic that costs around $20,000.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Cute.  Like a little iPhone 4 has been embedded in the dash.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 14
    XedXed Posts: 2,566member
    Nice! I'm a fan of classic cars, but I can't stand when they still have the original radios (and to a lesser extent 3rd-party units in any car that look bolted on).
    bloggerblogwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 14
    GG1GG1 Posts: 483member
    I really like that single-DIN radio. Come on, Blaupunkt, make one for the rest of us non-Porsche owners!
    StrangeDaysentropyswatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 14
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,654member
    That's actually not expensive for what car manufacturers charge for car radios and audio systems, which are incredible rip-offs.    The problem in most of today's cars is that the audio system is frequently tied in with the HVAC system and it's not a standard mount, making it almost impossible to efficiently switch out the radio.   I miss the days of DIN-sized mounts and standard DIN connectors.   I wish car manufacturers would return to that or the equivalent. 

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 14
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,124member
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 14
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 1,203member
    Awesome retrofit!  If I had a classic Porsche I’d go for it.  Other makers of collectible autos should take note.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 14
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 762editor
    rcfa said:
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.

    Yes, but DIN here just describes the form factor - it doesn't describe the wiring, and furthermore, no mfr uses the 2-DIN factor - they all integrate into their own fascias. Vintage Porsche owners are just lucky that the single DIN size they had used a faceplate for the 2 knob, versus having the holes for the 2 knobs in metal that would have to be hacked out, as early VW did.

    There is a DIN wiring spec, but manufactures don't really adhere to it - VW and Audi have used the connectors, but don't strictly adhere to the signals on the connector. GM has used the connector, but doesn't put the same signals in the same position -at all-.

    And wiring is another big issue: The infotainment system is integrated into the nav display on the gauge cluster, the heating and cooling are integrated, steering wheel controls... and even if none of those things are, CANBUS is, so there's no key-switched positive behind the dash, just negative and always-hot, with switching the unit and amplifiers controlled by serial data over CANBUS. 

    And wiring adapters don't help matters: they send signals over CANBUS, but don't respect the rest of the car network very well, sending messages when the ECU or diagnostic tool sends an all-quiet signal, for example.

    I've been making my own wiring harness adapters on my car (not a Porsche) to retain the stock radio board, have steering wheel controls handle volume for the stock board, amplifier, and aftermarket CarPlay, and audio provided by the aftermarket CarPlay. The point being, use the factory parts for CANBUS comms, use aftermarket for audio source.

    All this is to say, none of it is simple, or perfect, even if it's easy enough to wire up.
    StrangeDaysGG1watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 14
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 762editor
    zoetmb said:
    That's actually not expensive for what car manufacturers charge for car radios and audio systems, which are incredible rip-offs.    The problem in most of today's cars is that the audio system is frequently tied in with the HVAC system and it's not a standard mount, making it almost impossible to efficiently switch out the radio.   I miss the days of DIN-sized mounts and standard DIN connectors.   I wish car manufacturers would return to that or the equivalent. 


    Do you also miss anti-theft codes that lock the radio?

    I kind of prefer where we're at, with the factory radio flashed with the VIN, and it works as long as the VIN matches across the other computer modules.
  • Reply 9 of 14
    This is excellent - absolutely fantastic. 

    I’m not a big Porsche fan myself. But massively impressed by this. Other makers should pay attention here 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 14
    GG1GG1 Posts: 483member
    vmarks said:
    rcfa said:
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.

    Yes, but DIN here just describes the form factor - it doesn't describe the wiring, and furthermore, no mfr uses the 2-DIN factor - they all integrate into their own fascias. Vintage Porsche owners are just lucky that the single DIN size they had used a faceplate for the 2 knob, versus having the holes for the 2 knobs in metal that would have to be hacked out, as early VW did.

    There is a DIN wiring spec, but manufactures don't really adhere to it - VW and Audi have used the connectors, but don't strictly adhere to the signals on the connector. GM has used the connector, but doesn't put the same signals in the same position -at all-.

    And wiring is another big issue: The infotainment system is integrated into the nav display on the gauge cluster, the heating and cooling are integrated, steering wheel controls... and even if none of those things are, CANBUS is, so there's no key-switched positive behind the dash, just negative and always-hot, with switching the unit and amplifiers controlled by serial data over CANBUS. 

    And wiring adapters don't help matters: they send signals over CANBUS, but don't respect the rest of the car network very well, sending messages when the ECU or diagnostic tool sends an all-quiet signal, for example.

    I've been making my own wiring harness adapters on my car (not a Porsche) to retain the stock radio board, have steering wheel controls handle volume for the stock board, amplifier, and aftermarket CarPlay, and audio provided by the aftermarket CarPlay. The point being, use the factory parts for CANBUS comms, use aftermarket for audio source.

    All this is to say, none of it is simple, or perfect, even if it's easy enough to wire up.
    Do you know of a single-DIN CarPlay radio similar to the Porsche one pictured above?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 14
    entropysentropys Posts: 4,168member
    GG1 said:
    vmarks said:
    rcfa said:
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.

    Yes, but DIN here just describes the form factor - it doesn't describe the wiring, and furthermore, no mfr uses the 2-DIN factor - they all integrate into their own fascias. Vintage Porsche owners are just lucky that the single DIN size they had used a faceplate for the 2 knob, versus having the holes for the 2 knobs in metal that would have to be hacked out, as early VW did.

    There is a DIN wiring spec, but manufactures don't really adhere to it - VW and Audi have used the connectors, but don't strictly adhere to the signals on the connector. GM has used the connector, but doesn't put the same signals in the same position -at all-.

    And wiring is another big issue: The infotainment system is integrated into the nav display on the gauge cluster, the heating and cooling are integrated, steering wheel controls... and even if none of those things are, CANBUS is, so there's no key-switched positive behind the dash, just negative and always-hot, with switching the unit and amplifiers controlled by serial data over CANBUS. 

    And wiring adapters don't help matters: they send signals over CANBUS, but don't respect the rest of the car network very well, sending messages when the ECU or diagnostic tool sends an all-quiet signal, for example.

    I've been making my own wiring harness adapters on my car (not a Porsche) to retain the stock radio board, have steering wheel controls handle volume for the stock board, amplifier, and aftermarket CarPlay, and audio provided by the aftermarket CarPlay. The point being, use the factory parts for CANBUS comms, use aftermarket for audio source.

    All this is to say, none of it is simple, or perfect, even if it's easy enough to wire up.
    Do you know of a single-DIN CarPlay radio similar to the Porsche one pictured above?
    That would be the first I have seen and it’s a great idea, if expensive. Aftermarket head unit makers (eg Alpine or pioneer) typically have a pop up screen in single DIN units, so it ends up covering other parts of the dash like air vents. 
    edited April 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 14
    GG1GG1 Posts: 483member
    entropys said:
    GG1 said:
    vmarks said:
    rcfa said:
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.

    Yes, but DIN here just describes the form factor - it doesn't describe the wiring, and furthermore, no mfr uses the 2-DIN factor - they all integrate into their own fascias. Vintage Porsche owners are just lucky that the single DIN size they had used a faceplate for the 2 knob, versus having the holes for the 2 knobs in metal that would have to be hacked out, as early VW did.

    There is a DIN wiring spec, but manufactures don't really adhere to it - VW and Audi have used the connectors, but don't strictly adhere to the signals on the connector. GM has used the connector, but doesn't put the same signals in the same position -at all-.

    And wiring is another big issue: The infotainment system is integrated into the nav display on the gauge cluster, the heating and cooling are integrated, steering wheel controls... and even if none of those things are, CANBUS is, so there's no key-switched positive behind the dash, just negative and always-hot, with switching the unit and amplifiers controlled by serial data over CANBUS. 

    And wiring adapters don't help matters: they send signals over CANBUS, but don't respect the rest of the car network very well, sending messages when the ECU or diagnostic tool sends an all-quiet signal, for example.

    I've been making my own wiring harness adapters on my car (not a Porsche) to retain the stock radio board, have steering wheel controls handle volume for the stock board, amplifier, and aftermarket CarPlay, and audio provided by the aftermarket CarPlay. The point being, use the factory parts for CANBUS comms, use aftermarket for audio source.

    All this is to say, none of it is simple, or perfect, even if it's easy enough to wire up.
    Do you know of a single-DIN CarPlay radio similar to the Porsche one pictured above?
    That would be the first I have seen and it’s a great idea, if expensive. Aftermarket head unit makers (eg Alpine or pioneer) typically have a pop up screen in single DIN units, so it ends up covering other parts of the dash like air vents. 
    I've seen those, but that is not elegant IMO. That Porsche single-DIN radio is tastefully done and well-executed, given the small amount of area to work with.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 14
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 762editor
    GG1 said:
    entropys said:
    GG1 said:
    vmarks said:
    rcfa said:
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.

    Yes, but DIN here just describes the form factor - it doesn't describe the wiring, and furthermore, no mfr uses the 2-DIN factor - they all integrate into their own fascias. Vintage Porsche owners are just lucky that the single DIN size they had used a faceplate for the 2 knob, versus having the holes for the 2 knobs in metal that would have to be hacked out, as early VW did.

    There is a DIN wiring spec, but manufactures don't really adhere to it - VW and Audi have used the connectors, but don't strictly adhere to the signals on the connector. GM has used the connector, but doesn't put the same signals in the same position -at all-.

    And wiring is another big issue: The infotainment system is integrated into the nav display on the gauge cluster, the heating and cooling are integrated, steering wheel controls... and even if none of those things are, CANBUS is, so there's no key-switched positive behind the dash, just negative and always-hot, with switching the unit and amplifiers controlled by serial data over CANBUS. 

    And wiring adapters don't help matters: they send signals over CANBUS, but don't respect the rest of the car network very well, sending messages when the ECU or diagnostic tool sends an all-quiet signal, for example.

    I've been making my own wiring harness adapters on my car (not a Porsche) to retain the stock radio board, have steering wheel controls handle volume for the stock board, amplifier, and aftermarket CarPlay, and audio provided by the aftermarket CarPlay. The point being, use the factory parts for CANBUS comms, use aftermarket for audio source.

    All this is to say, none of it is simple, or perfect, even if it's easy enough to wire up.
    Do you know of a single-DIN CarPlay radio similar to the Porsche one pictured above?
    That would be the first I have seen and it’s a great idea, if expensive. Aftermarket head unit makers (eg Alpine or pioneer) typically have a pop up screen in single DIN units, so it ends up covering other parts of the dash like air vents. 
    I've seen those, but that is not elegant IMO. That Porsche single-DIN radio is tastefully done and well-executed, given the small amount of area to work with.
    No one else (that I know of) is making a 3.5" display for the 2-knob vintage set, because that screen is veeeeerrrrrryyyyyyy small.

    Think about the common CarPlay taps - tapping at top of screen for a notification, tapping on the left side to switch between maps or music... the smallest I've used it on has been a 6 inch screen. 

    The nice news about this unit is, there wasn't complex wiring on a 1960s Porsche - Power, GND, switched power, antenna, and 8 audio signals. This radio should work in any single DIN car, if you can imagine paying Porsche prices for it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 14
    GG1GG1 Posts: 483member
    vmarks said:
    GG1 said:
    entropys said:
    GG1 said:
    vmarks said:
    rcfa said:
    The whole point of the DIN Form factor is, that with proper cable adapters these should fit into just about any car with DIN or double-DIN car radios.

    Yes, but DIN here just describes the form factor - it doesn't describe the wiring, and furthermore, no mfr uses the 2-DIN factor - they all integrate into their own fascias. Vintage Porsche owners are just lucky that the single DIN size they had used a faceplate for the 2 knob, versus having the holes for the 2 knobs in metal that would have to be hacked out, as early VW did.

    There is a DIN wiring spec, but manufactures don't really adhere to it - VW and Audi have used the connectors, but don't strictly adhere to the signals on the connector. GM has used the connector, but doesn't put the same signals in the same position -at all-.

    And wiring is another big issue: The infotainment system is integrated into the nav display on the gauge cluster, the heating and cooling are integrated, steering wheel controls... and even if none of those things are, CANBUS is, so there's no key-switched positive behind the dash, just negative and always-hot, with switching the unit and amplifiers controlled by serial data over CANBUS. 

    And wiring adapters don't help matters: they send signals over CANBUS, but don't respect the rest of the car network very well, sending messages when the ECU or diagnostic tool sends an all-quiet signal, for example.

    I've been making my own wiring harness adapters on my car (not a Porsche) to retain the stock radio board, have steering wheel controls handle volume for the stock board, amplifier, and aftermarket CarPlay, and audio provided by the aftermarket CarPlay. The point being, use the factory parts for CANBUS comms, use aftermarket for audio source.

    All this is to say, none of it is simple, or perfect, even if it's easy enough to wire up.
    Do you know of a single-DIN CarPlay radio similar to the Porsche one pictured above?
    That would be the first I have seen and it’s a great idea, if expensive. Aftermarket head unit makers (eg Alpine or pioneer) typically have a pop up screen in single DIN units, so it ends up covering other parts of the dash like air vents. 
    I've seen those, but that is not elegant IMO. That Porsche single-DIN radio is tastefully done and well-executed, given the small amount of area to work with.
    No one else (that I know of) is making a 3.5" display for the 2-knob vintage set, because that screen is veeeeerrrrrryyyyyyy small.

    Think about the common CarPlay taps - tapping at top of screen for a notification, tapping on the left side to switch between maps or music... the smallest I've used it on has been a 6 inch screen. 

    The nice news about this unit is, there wasn't complex wiring on a 1960s Porsche - Power, GND, switched power, antenna, and 8 audio signals. This radio should work in any single DIN car, if you can imagine paying Porsche prices for it.
    Looks good, but you're right: 3.5" display is probably too small to be practical.
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