Apple releases macOS Catalina 10.15.5 with new battery health management feature

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    gilly33 said:
    Hmmm I wonder if this update will fix the crash on awake bug that has crippled my iMac. I just gave up two Apple senior advisors later. 
    That's my hope as well. I installed early today (May 26th) and turned power nap back on (turning it off solved the problem before but I want power nap enabled). So far no crashes on wake-up.
    I wonder how many returned MacBooks Apple could’ve saved themselves by identifying that this issue was being addressed.
    It was definitely annoying and they probably could have saved lots. Turning off power nap solved it for me prior to this update. This update allows power nap to work properly and no more crashes.
  • Reply 22 of 32
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    Yes. They especially need to get back to bug fixing and usability testing. Aside from the constantly added regressions, the UI is full of empty space but the text everywhere is unnecessarily small.

    When you do a first-time setup, you can’t change the display mode or activate accessibility features, and the setup process is rife with small text.

    Frankly, users shouldn’t have to change these things on their end when they are just in their 30s and 40s, with or without glasses. There’s plenty of space in the UI for larger text. We were sitting right in front of it, with glasses on & off, and it’s just too damned small for comfortable reading.

    It’s like proper UI design and testing went out at Apple in 2013 when iOS 7 was unleashed. Mac OS has been following along with more and more bugs and UI stupidity, and most changes have been to serve iOS devices, not Mac OS.
    elijahg
  • Reply 23 of 32
    So many issues even after this update. Reapplied the Combo updater to see if that helps!
  • Reply 24 of 32
    svanstromsvanstrom Posts: 702member
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    What do you expect/want? It's a computer, and it works damn much better out-of-the-box than any competitor within the same market; so what is so underwhelming about it? Do you expect it to entertain you like a toy, dangling shiny objects keeping your attention at the computer?
  • Reply 25 of 32
    svanstromsvanstrom Posts: 702member
    dysamoria said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    Yes. They especially need to get back to bug fixing and usability testing. Aside from the constantly added regressions, the UI is full of empty space but the text everywhere is unnecessarily small.

    When you do a first-time setup, you can’t change the display mode or activate accessibility features, and the setup process is rife with small text.

    Frankly, users shouldn’t have to change these things on their end when they are just in their 30s and 40s, with or without glasses. There’s plenty of space in the UI for larger text. We were sitting right in front of it, with glasses on & off, and it’s just too damned small for comfortable reading.

    It’s like proper UI design and testing went out at Apple in 2013 when iOS 7 was unleashed. Mac OS has been following along with more and more bugs and UI stupidity, and most changes have been to serve iOS devices, not Mac OS.
    Personally (40+) the first thing I do after setup is to scale things down to make the text smaller, so granted I'm perhaps not your average user as far as this; but… I don't get how the standard text size can be so below what's needed to be read on any somewhat modern display (you know, with a quality sort of matching the modernness of a new Mac). Have you actually seen a decent optometrist somewhat recently, to make sure that you have the right glasses?
  • Reply 26 of 32
    svanstrom said:
    dysamoria said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    Yes. They especially need to get back to bug fixing and usability testing. Aside from the constantly added regressions, the UI is full of empty space but the text everywhere is unnecessarily small.

    When you do a first-time setup, you can’t change the display mode or activate accessibility features, and the setup process is rife with small text.

    Frankly, users shouldn’t have to change these things on their end when they are just in their 30s and 40s, with or without glasses. There’s plenty of space in the UI for larger text. We were sitting right in front of it, with glasses on & off, and it’s just too damned small for comfortable reading.

    It’s like proper UI design and testing went out at Apple in 2013 when iOS 7 was unleashed. Mac OS has been following along with more and more bugs and UI stupidity, and most changes have been to serve iOS devices, not Mac OS.
    Personally (40+) the first thing I do after setup is to scale things down to make the text smaller, so granted I'm perhaps not your average user as far as this; but… I don't get how the standard text size can be so below what's needed to be read on any somewhat modern display (you know, with a quality sort of matching the modernness of a new Mac). Have you actually seen a decent optometrist somewhat recently, to make sure that you have the right glasses?
    I'm 50+ and eyesight is an issue but with a proper prescription even I can use the max resolution on a 13" or 16" MBP; 400/500 nits or higher. At 300 nits like an older Mac it starts to get a harder since the contrast is lower. Admittedly its also bit harder in dark mode but it only seems to bother me when I think about it. One thing I recommend is using the Accessibility panel in the System Preferences > Displays to reduce transparency. Honestly I think it looks better in that mode and its easier to see. All that transparency stuff from OS X (before macOS) was just a gimmick in my opinion.
  • Reply 27 of 32

    svanstrom said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    What do you expect/want? It's a computer, and it works damn much better out-of-the-box than any competitor within the same market; so what is so underwhelming about it? Do you expect it to entertain you like a toy, dangling shiny objects keeping your attention at the computer?
    I just spend two days taming Catalina. As of 10.15.5 all is going smooth but I had to update every app, delete all the old ktext, clear every cache and reindex the entire machine several times to catch all of the cruft that has been building on my Mac over the last 20-years. Catalina is unforgiving, which is good from a security perspective.
    edited May 2020
  • Reply 28 of 32
    CheeseFreezeCheeseFreeze Posts: 1,100member
    svanstrom said:
    dysamoria said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    Yes. They especially need to get back to bug fixing and usability testing. Aside from the constantly added regressions, the UI is full of empty space but the text everywhere is unnecessarily small.

    When you do a first-time setup, you can’t change the display mode or activate accessibility features, and the setup process is rife with small text.

    Frankly, users shouldn’t have to change these things on their end when they are just in their 30s and 40s, with or without glasses. There’s plenty of space in the UI for larger text. We were sitting right in front of it, with glasses on & off, and it’s just too damned small for comfortable reading.

    It’s like proper UI design and testing went out at Apple in 2013 when iOS 7 was unleashed. Mac OS has been following along with more and more bugs and UI stupidity, and most changes have been to serve iOS devices, not Mac OS.
    Personally (40+) the first thing I do after setup is to scale things down to make the text smaller, so granted I'm perhaps not your average user as far as this; but… I don't get how the standard text size can be so below what's needed to be read on any somewhat modern display (you know, with a quality sort of matching the modernness of a new Mac). Have you actually seen a decent optometrist somewhat recently, to make sure that you have the right glasses?
    Just for inspiration: check out the latest Ubuntu. I was surprised to see how well the UI is done for an operating system that is open source. Very minimalist / pleasing.
    svanstrom
  • Reply 29 of 32
    svanstrom said:
    dysamoria said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    Yes. They especially need to get back to bug fixing and usability testing. Aside from the constantly added regressions, the UI is full of empty space but the text everywhere is unnecessarily small.

    When you do a first-time setup, you can’t change the display mode or activate accessibility features, and the setup process is rife with small text.

    Frankly, users shouldn’t have to change these things on their end when they are just in their 30s and 40s, with or without glasses. There’s plenty of space in the UI for larger text. We were sitting right in front of it, with glasses on & off, and it’s just too damned small for comfortable reading.

    It’s like proper UI design and testing went out at Apple in 2013 when iOS 7 was unleashed. Mac OS has been following along with more and more bugs and UI stupidity, and most changes have been to serve iOS devices, not Mac OS.
    Personally (40+) the first thing I do after setup is to scale things down to make the text smaller, so granted I'm perhaps not your average user as far as this; but… I don't get how the standard text size can be so below what's needed to be read on any somewhat modern display (you know, with a quality sort of matching the modernness of a new Mac). Have you actually seen a decent optometrist somewhat recently, to make sure that you have the right glasses?
    Just for inspiration: check out the latest Ubuntu. I was surprised to see how well the UI is done for an operating system that is open source. Very minimalist / pleasing.
    And yet 30 years later Linux is no closer to cracking the desktop market because it's a chaotic mess of this and that.
  • Reply 30 of 32
    svanstromsvanstrom Posts: 702member

    svanstrom said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    What do you expect/want? It's a computer, and it works damn much better out-of-the-box than any competitor within the same market; so what is so underwhelming about it? Do you expect it to entertain you like a toy, dangling shiny objects keeping your attention at the computer?
    I just spend two days taming Catalina. As of 10.15.5 all is going smooth but I had to update every app, delete all the old ktext, clear every cache and reindex the entire machine several times to catch all of the cruft that has been building on my Mac over the last 20-years. Catalina is unforgiving, which is good from a security perspective.
    As much as it shouldn't be needed, it's always good practice to on a new computer reinstall everything from scratch; and only transfer what you actually need to transfer.

    Even ignoring security and compatibility aspects of it there's a lot to gain from reevaluating how you personally are working rn. There's just less gain from a new computer/OS if you still rely on software and workflows that's been the same for decades. Try to live with the basic features included in the OS, and google what people actually use today to solve any limitations you come across.

    When I set up my MBP16 I found that there was nothing outside of iCloud that I needed to transfer from my old computer; so there's no legacy anything that could slow me down going forward. And there are no old files just taking up storage.
  • Reply 31 of 32
    svanstrom said:

    svanstrom said:
    Catalina has been the most underwhelming version of OS X, followed by Mojave that my former company has produced in well over a decade. The lack of vision under Federighi is quite stark and disappointing. 

    They need new blood overseeing OS X.
    What do you expect/want? It's a computer, and it works damn much better out-of-the-box than any competitor within the same market; so what is so underwhelming about it? Do you expect it to entertain you like a toy, dangling shiny objects keeping your attention at the computer?
    I just spend two days taming Catalina. As of 10.15.5 all is going smooth but I had to update every app, delete all the old ktext, clear every cache and reindex the entire machine several times to catch all of the cruft that has been building on my Mac over the last 20-years. Catalina is unforgiving, which is good from a security perspective.
    As much as it shouldn't be needed, it's always good practice to on a new computer reinstall everything from scratch; and only transfer what you actually need to transfer.

    Even ignoring security and compatibility aspects of it there's a lot to gain from reevaluating how you personally are working rn. There's just less gain from a new computer/OS if you still rely on software and workflows that's been the same for decades. Try to live with the basic features included in the OS, and google what people actually use today to solve any limitations you come across.

    When I set up my MBP16 I found that there was nothing outside of iCloud that I needed to transfer from my old computer; so there's no legacy anything that could slow me down going forward. And there are no old files just taking up storage.

    I just migrating from Mojave not OS 9. I've been migrating from one OS version to the next probably for the past ten years and this leaves behind a lot of odd preference files,  extensions, etc, in the Library folders. Nothing to reevaluate since I'm already running the latest and greatest. It would take twice as long to set everything up again just to cleanup the leftovers, which is why I use the migration tool.
  • Reply 32 of 32
    warnergtwarnergt Posts: 9member
    Did the 10.15.5 Catalina update to my 2019 Mac Pro.
    Then, I got this message.

    I used macOS Utilities to reinstall macOS and got the same problem.
    I completely restored my drive back to 10.15.4 (took all night).
    Ran update again and got same problem.

    This time, I selected "Startup Disk..." I selected my startup disk and it resumed installing.
    About 10-15 minutes later, it was done and 10.15.5 was up and running.

    What's up with that?

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