Microsoft compares Surface Laptop 4 to MacBook Air in new ad

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 30
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,161member
    darkvader said:
    You know what would be great? 

    A company taking shots at Apple because their laptops are fragile and hard to repair or upgrade.

    Know what company can't do that? 

    Microsloth, because their garbage laptops are even less repairable than Apple's.
    Maybe you don't know, but you can replace / upgrade the SSD in the Surface Laptop / Surface Pro.  So it looks like Apple devices are less repairable than MS devices.  
  • Reply 22 of 30
    danvm said:
    Yes, USB-A will be phased out, but as today it isn't.  And that's I think was the problem with Apple devices, they didn't make a transition.  They just eliminate USB-A when millions of customers still use it every day.  Do you really think that customers would throw out all of their usable USB-A devices just because Apple said so?  This is not something about  courage or being coward.  It's about what customers need.  And based in what I have seen and read,  looks like Apple was wrong by removing USB-A ports.  
    I beg to differ :)
    I seriously want to get rid of as much as possible of the old stuff and get only USB C (with Thunderbolt). It will be happy days when there are no USB A/A mini/B/Lightening cables and devices left in the house, and I can manage with a couple of high quality USB C cables. 
    Detnator
  • Reply 23 of 30
    danvm said:
    darkvader said:
    You know what would be great? 

    A company taking shots at Apple because their laptops are fragile and hard to repair or upgrade.

    Know what company can't do that? 

    Microsloth, because their garbage laptops are even less repairable than Apple's.
    Maybe you don't know, but you can replace / upgrade the SSD in the Surface Laptop / Surface Pro.  So it looks like Apple devices are less repairable than MS devices.  
    I believe the statement was referring to how you have to swap Surfaces if you crack the screen. I had to help a friend who’s employee kept breaking the glass on his surface and there was no method of just repairing the screen. You had to erase the device and ship it to Microsoft or pay a deposit to get one sent to you first and then ship your old one back. No repairs and no local authorized repair. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 30
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,161member
    Hubro said:
    danvm said:
    Yes, USB-A will be phased out, but as today it isn't.  And that's I think was the problem with Apple devices, they didn't make a transition.  They just eliminate USB-A when millions of customers still use it every day.  Do you really think that customers would throw out all of their usable USB-A devices just because Apple said so?  This is not something about  courage or being coward.  It's about what customers need.  And based in what I have seen and read,  looks like Apple was wrong by removing USB-A ports.  
    I beg to differ :)
    I seriously want to get rid of as much as possible of the old stuff and get only USB C (with Thunderbolt). It will be happy days when there are no USB A/A mini/B/Lightening cables and devices left in the house, and I can manage with a couple of high quality USB C cables. 
    I'm looking forward to stop using USB-A too.  But in reality, I won't replace a functional device (specially an expensive one) just because USB-C is better.  Maybe that's not my case, but from what I have seen and read, it is for many people. 
  • Reply 25 of 30
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,161member
    danvm said:
    darkvader said:
    You know what would be great? 

    A company taking shots at Apple because their laptops are fragile and hard to repair or upgrade.

    Know what company can't do that? 

    Microsloth, because their garbage laptops are even less repairable than Apple's.
    Maybe you don't know, but you can replace / upgrade the SSD in the Surface Laptop / Surface Pro.  So it looks like Apple devices are less repairable than MS devices.  
    I believe the statement was referring to how you have to swap Surfaces if you crack the screen. I had to help a friend who’s employee kept breaking the glass on his surface and there was no method of just repairing the screen. You had to erase the device and ship it to Microsoft or pay a deposit to get one sent to you first and then ship your old one back. No repairs and no local authorized repair. 
    That's the reason I recommend ThinkPad to my customers.  They have onsite warranty for PC's and notebooks.  If it has no warranty, they are very easy to open and fix.  That's something I miss in my Surface Pro and MBP.  
  • Reply 26 of 30
    AI_liasAI_lias Posts: 391member
    Hubro said:
    danvm said:
    Yes, USB-A will be phased out, but as today it isn't.  And that's I think was the problem with Apple devices, they didn't make a transition.  They just eliminate USB-A when millions of customers still use it every day.  Do you really think that customers would throw out all of their usable USB-A devices just because Apple said so?  This is not something about  courage or being coward.  It's about what customers need.  And based in what I have seen and read,  looks like Apple was wrong by removing USB-A ports.  
    I beg to differ :)
    I seriously want to get rid of as much as possible of the old stuff and get only USB C (with Thunderbolt). It will be happy days when there are no USB A/A mini/B/Lightening cables and devices left in the house, and I can manage with a couple of high quality USB C cables. 
    We all want this, it's true, but the reality is that these devices are still around, and not everyone has the money and convenience to get rid of all of their USB-A devices. I bet by the time you finally got rid of all of them, you'll enjoy 2 years before another upgrade is necessary. So this was not necessary. The pain wasn't worth the benefit of removing USB-A ports, for majority of people. Yes, Apple had courage, but I was misplaced courage.
  • Reply 27 of 30
    AI_lias said:
    Hubro said:
    danvm said:
    Yes, USB-A will be phased out, but as today it isn't.  And that's I think was the problem with Apple devices, they didn't make a transition.  They just eliminate USB-A when millions of customers still use it every day.  Do you really think that customers would throw out all of their usable USB-A devices just because Apple said so?  This is not something about  courage or being coward.  It's about what customers need.  And based in what I have seen and read,  looks like Apple was wrong by removing USB-A ports.  
    I beg to differ :)
    I seriously want to get rid of as much as possible of the old stuff and get only USB C (with Thunderbolt). It will be happy days when there are no USB A/A mini/B/Lightening cables and devices left in the house, and I can manage with a couple of high quality USB C cables. 
    We all want this, it's true, but the reality is that these devices are still around, and not everyone has the money and convenience to get rid of all of their USB-A devices. I bet by the time you finally got rid of all of them, you'll enjoy 2 years before another upgrade is necessary. So this was not necessary. The pain wasn't worth the benefit of removing USB-A ports, for majority of people. Yes, Apple had courage, but I was misplaced courage.
    I believe Apple deserves quite some credit for the development of USB C (usb is still a mess) by putting pressure through Thunderbolt.

    To get the best economy, ride and mileage out of computers my advice would be to buy the best specced 2-3 year old gear available within the budget at hand, and sell it before it turns 5-6 years old. One gets decent gear with decent performance at sensible cost per annum. Mind you, Apple silicon M1 is a highly probable interruption to that principle, and IMHO M1 should result in a pleasant  drop in 2nd hand prices (for buyers) simply because of its performance at a significantly lower price point.
  • Reply 28 of 30
    I've used both and the Macbook has better performance and value. Unfortunately for me, I think the design looks very dated and I'll probably choose an XPS for my next laptop because for everyday tasks do you really don't notice the performance differences and with Windows you have more flexibility to play the occasional game. I don't love Windows as an OS, though.
  • Reply 29 of 30
    thttht Posts: 3,981member
    AI_lias said:
    Hubro said:
    danvm said:
    Yes, USB-A will be phased out, but as today it isn't.  And that's I think was the problem with Apple devices, they didn't make a transition.  They just eliminate USB-A when millions of customers still use it every day.  Do you really think that customers would throw out all of their usable USB-A devices just because Apple said so?  This is not something about  courage or being coward.  It's about what customers need.  And based in what I have seen and read,  looks like Apple was wrong by removing USB-A ports.  
    I beg to differ :)
    I seriously want to get rid of as much as possible of the old stuff and get only USB C (with Thunderbolt). It will be happy days when there are no USB A/A mini/B/Lightening cables and devices left in the house, and I can manage with a couple of high quality USB C cables. 
    We all want this, it's true, but the reality is that these devices are still around, and not everyone has the money and convenience to get rid of all of their USB-A devices. I bet by the time you finally got rid of all of them, you'll enjoy 2 years before another upgrade is necessary. So this was not necessary. The pain wasn't worth the benefit of removing USB-A ports, for majority of people. Yes, Apple had courage, but I was misplaced courage.
    I just bought a few of these and called it a day:





    The connector isn't the big issue though. Well, it is the big issue, perhaps. USB protocols are a moving target and USBC cables can't act as TB cables, I think. So, there is a mix and match of cabling that isn't compatible that is using the same connector. You have to be aware of what the cable supports. So, the transition has kind of been a in shambles for a while. Hopefully USB4 finally unites everything.

    However, we probably shouldn't rely on cabling and port stability. Sometime in the not so distant future, 8K monitors are coming. External 8 GByte/s SSDs are coming. That means at minimum a new protocol standard that may present compatibility problems even if it uses the same connector.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 30
    tht said:

    The connector isn't the big issue though. Well, it is the big issue, perhaps. USB protocols are a moving target and USBC cables can't act as TB cables, I think. So, there is a mix and match of cabling that isn't compatible that is using the same connector. You have to be aware of what the cable supports. So, the transition has kind of been a in shambles for a while. Hopefully USB4 finally unites everything.

    However, we probably shouldn't rely on cabling and port stability. Sometime in the not so distant future, 8K monitors are coming. External 8 GByte/s SSDs are coming. That means at minimum a new protocol standard that may present compatibility problems even if it uses the same connector.
    I'm sure there will be more USB circus to come, and there will be cable replacements accordingly. But there will only be a few (but expensive) cables to replace to reach equilibrium again.
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