Apple reveals first states to use Apple Wallet for ID, driver's licence

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 2021
Apple has announced that Arizona and Georgia are to support Apple Wallet for state ID and drivers' licences in iOS 15, with six more states to follow.

Apple Wallet will be able to store your drivers' licence in certain states
Apple Wallet will be able to store your drivers' licence in certain states


Apple has long been preparing to have passports and other ID stored on iPhones, and iOS 15 will add support for it. Now the company has announced seven states that have signed on to accept ID through Apple Wallet.

Arizona and Georgia will be first, followed by Connecticut, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma, and Utah. At the same time, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is enabling selected airport security checkpoints to work with Apple Wallet.

"The addition of driver's licenses and state IDs to Apple Wallet is an important step in our vision of replacing the physical wallet with a secure and easy-to-use mobile wallet," said Jennifer Bailey, Apple's vice president of Apple Pay and Apple Wallet, in a statement.

"We are excited that the TSA and so many states are already on board to help bring this to life for travelers across the country using only their iPhone and Apple Watch," she continued, "and we are already in discussions with many more states as we're working to offer this nationwide in the future."

"This new and innovative mobile driver's license and state ID initiative with Apple and states around the country will enable a more seamless airport security screening experience for travelers," said David Pekoske, TSA Administrator. "This initiative marks a major milestone by TSA to provide an additional level of convenience for the traveler by enabling more opportunities for touchless TSA airport security screening."

Apple has not announced a date by which the states, or the TSA, will implement their support of Apple Wallet. It will require iOS 15, which Apple is expected to release publicly alongside the launch of the "iPhone 13."

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 63
    XedXed Posts: 1,434member
    1) Most of those aren't the states I'd have thought would be first to support digital IDs.

    2) Even once this is enabled by the TSA the inconsistency of the TSA across airports will have me bring a physical ID with me for a very, very, very long time. Good as a backup, I guess.
    llama
  • Reply 2 of 63
    Yay. Connecticut! My state. It would be a good backup in case I left my wallet at home. It happens.
    llama
  • Reply 3 of 63
    llamallama Posts: 101member
    Come on, Virginia!  I doubt they will join this willingly.  After 9/11 Virginia has been a PITA for IDs as apparently we were the best place for the hijackers to get their IDs.  
  • Reply 4 of 63
    Xed said:
    1) Most of those aren't the states I'd have thought would be first to support digital IDs.

    2) Even once this is enabled by the TSA the inconsistency of the TSA across airports will have me bring a physical ID with me for a very, very, very long time. Good as a backup, I guess.
    Same. Never would have thought Arizona would be first in line. I live in Phoenix and it shocked me to read that. I’m excited for this update as it will allow me to carry one less thing around with me for every day errands. For traveling ill bring my ID as a backup for sure. The only thing keeping me tied to a physical wallet was the ID in case I got pulled over or it was needed as verification for an online order pickup. 98% of the stores I frequent use Apple Pay (the major exception being stupid Frys/Kroger) so carrying around just my phone/watch would be perfect. My major gripe is how long its going to take me to stop panicking that I’ve left my wallet somewhere and then remembering its just at home. Haha.
    hammeroftruthJFC_PAspock1234
  • Reply 5 of 63
    Love the idea. I already use Apple Pay everywhere I can.  How do the state laws address this, though?  If I voluntarily hand law enforcement my phone to show them my ID, have I just given them the authority to go through it?  
    bageljoey12Strangersbaconstangkingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 6 of 63
    d-rey said:
    Love the idea. I already use Apple Pay everywhere I can.  How do the state laws address this, though?  If I voluntarily hand law enforcement my phone to show them my ID, have I just given them the authority to go through it?  
    Its part of Apple Wallet, you just bring up your DL on the lock screen as you do with boarding passes, rail tickets etc. You do not unlock your phone.
    applguyspock1234kingofsomewherehotStrangeDaysappleinsideruser
  • Reply 7 of 63
    mwhitemwhite Posts: 283member
    Arizona already has AZ mobile id with my drivers license on it.
    JWSCGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 8 of 63
    mwhitemwhite Posts: 283member
    602warren said:
    Xed said:
    1) Most of those aren't the states I'd have thought would be first to support digital IDs.

    2) Even once this is enabled by the TSA the inconsistency of the TSA across airports will have me bring a physical ID with me for a very, very, very long time. Good as a backup, I guess.
    Same. Never would have thought Arizona would be first in line. I live in Phoenix and it shocked me to read that. I’m excited for this update as it will allow me to carry one less thing around with me for every day errands. For traveling ill bring my ID as a backup for sure. The only thing keeping me tied to a physical wallet was the ID in case I got pulled over or it was needed as verification for an online order pickup. 98% of the stores I frequent use Apple Pay (the major exception being stupid Frys/Kroger) so carrying around just my phone/watch would be perfect. My major gripe is how long its going to take me to stop panicking that I’ve left my wallet somewhere and then remembering its just at home. Haha.
    Check out AZ mobile id on the app store, I have my license on it.


    602warrenJWSC
  • Reply 9 of 63
    I’d really like to see Apple offer a validation app (for both Android and iOS) so that Rental Car places // grocery stores // etc. … start the long, slow process of getting non-government places to understand how to accept digital IDs.
  • Reply 10 of 63
    mwhite said:
    602warren said:
    Xed said:
    1) Most of those aren't the states I'd have thought would be first to support digital IDs.

    2) Even once this is enabled by the TSA the inconsistency of the TSA across airports will have me bring a physical ID with me for a very, very, very long time. Good as a backup, I guess.
    Same. Never would have thought Arizona would be first in line. I live in Phoenix and it shocked me to read that. I’m excited for this update as it will allow me to carry one less thing around with me for every day errands. For traveling ill bring my ID as a backup for sure. The only thing keeping me tied to a physical wallet was the ID in case I got pulled over or it was needed as verification for an online order pickup. 98% of the stores I frequent use Apple Pay (the major exception being stupid Frys/Kroger) so carrying around just my phone/watch would be perfect. My major gripe is how long its going to take me to stop panicking that I’ve left my wallet somewhere and then remembering its just at home. Haha.
    Check out AZ mobile id on the app store, I have my license on it.


    It’s not a replacement though, you still need to carry your ID with AZ mobile ID. From the description in the App Store:

    Please note:  Arizona Mobile ID is considered an official state-issued ID, serving as a companion to your physical ID. Please continue to carry your physical ID because not all entities are able to verify mID yet. 

    So for now, you still need your physical id to be carried with you. Which is still shocking for AZ, a state that aims when shooting itself in the foot. 
    edited September 2021 602warren12Strangers
  • Reply 11 of 63
    I’m guessing it can’t be used for voter ID. Won’t surprise me. 
  • Reply 12 of 63
    loopless said:
    d-rey said:
    Love the idea. I already use Apple Pay everywhere I can.  How do the state laws address this, though?  If I voluntarily hand law enforcement my phone to show them my ID, have I just given them the authority to go through it?  
    Its part of Apple Wallet, you just bring up your DL on the lock screen as you do with boarding passes, rail tickets etc. You do not unlock your phone.
    Yes, but with boarding passes, rail tickets, etc, I’m not actually giving my phone to law enforcement.  Even with the TSA, I’m placing my phone on a scanner and retrieving it.  I don’t actually hand it to the agent.  If I’m pulled over by a cop, they currently will take my license back to their squad car while they pull up my information in their system.  Are the police going to have a handheld scanner so I don’t have to relinquish possession of my phone?  Regardless of one’s overall feelings towards law enforcement, one has to acknowledge that some of them are not to be trusted.

    Now if there was a ‘cop mode’ that could be quickly enabled from Control Center that only presents ID’s & insurance cards, I might use it if it also locks the phone requiring a passcode to unlock the phone.  I think some courts have ruled that bio-metrics aren’t even considered protected like a passcode is.  Cops can’t make you give them your passcode without a warrant, but I believe at least in some jurisdictions, they don’t need a warrant to make you use touchID or FaceID to unlock your phone.
    edited September 2021 OctoMonkeykingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 13 of 63
    Ah I guess Washington will be one of the last states, so anal
    williamlondon
  • Reply 14 of 63
    Law enforcement across the nation will not be warm to online photo ID.  It going take several years before they warm up to it!  I keep my driver's licenses with me for that reason.  I do not want to be hassled and face being arrested and spending a night in jail, interview, hire a lawyer and posting bail to get out of jail.  Cost is around $2K-$4K depending on charge and attorney not including amount to post bond.
    edited September 2021 williamlondonllamaravnorodom
  • Reply 15 of 63
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,919member
    Ah I guess Washington will be one of the last states, so anal
    I have a Washington state enhanced driver's license. It satisfies all the federal and state requirements and has an embedded chip so it can be used for ground transportation over the Canadian border. As far as I'm concerned, TSA needs to be shut down. We already have to deal with the Border Patrol up to 100 miles from any border, land or sea. As for having the user scan their ID, that's absolutely insane. This makes it an unofficial copy of a governmental ID. To do it right, the ID would need to come as an encrypted and signed electronic file that is stored in Apple's secure enclave. Accessing it would only be approved via Apple's NFC connection. I know current cards and passports are paper but if you're going to change things do it right.

    If these states are approving electronic IDs why won't they allow official vaccination documents? I've been wanting my entire medical history stored on my iPhone so I can quit filling out the same stupid forms at different medical provider's offices. 
    kingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 16 of 63
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,680member
    602warren said:
    Xed said:
    1) Most of those aren't the states I'd have thought would be first to support digital IDs.

    2) Even once this is enabled by the TSA the inconsistency of the TSA across airports will have me bring a physical ID with me for a very, very, very long time. Good as a backup, I guess.
    Same. Never would have thought Arizona would be first in line. I live in Phoenix and it shocked me to read that. I’m excited for this update as it will allow me to carry one less thing around with me for every day errands. For traveling ill bring my ID as a backup for sure. The only thing keeping me tied to a physical wallet was the ID in case I got pulled over or it was needed as verification for an online order pickup. 98% of the stores I frequent use Apple Pay (the major exception being stupid Frys/Kroger) so carrying around just my phone/watch would be perfect. My major gripe is how long its going to take me to stop panicking that I’ve left my wallet somewhere and then remembering its just at home. Haha.
    Concur. This will never be primary for me. There will be inconsistency for a very long time, and all it takes is one police officer to simply refuse it, and hold you for an extended time because "this isn't your driver's license. And here's a ticket for not having it. Tell the judge." Or you miss a flight because passport control simply has "no authority" etc etc. 

    I am also curious about what it means when you offer an iPhone to law enforcement for ID purposes. I presume the rest of the contents are locked, but surrendering possession of the device might have...4th and 14th amendment...consequences. 
  • Reply 17 of 63
    Xed said:
    1) Most of those aren't the states I'd have thought would be first to support digital IDs.

    2) Even once this is enabled by the TSA the inconsistency of the TSA across airports will have me bring a physical ID with me for a very, very, very long time. Good as a backup, I guess.
    As someone who's had a digital ID license in Utah for a few months (admittedly I was part of the seconds group - the first publicly available one), I can say sometimes Utah does well in the tech arena. Not always, but there are certainly moments.

    With that said, having it in the Wallet is soooo much more convenient than the TestFlight (beta) app that's required now.

    Hopefully there will be a convenient way to show both the ID and your ticket in the Apple Wallet for the TSA. The way things are now, well, it wouldn't be drop dead simple (unless you had your ticket on your watch and your DL on your phone.)
    edited September 2021
  • Reply 18 of 63
    South Carolina will be last...we're still using mouth and hoof inspections to validate our transportation's operation.
    roundaboutnownapoleon_phoneapartwilliamlondonrfichoke
  • Reply 19 of 63
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 697member
    d-rey said:
    loopless said:
    d-rey said:
    Love the idea. I already use Apple Pay everywhere I can.  How do the state laws address this, though?  If I voluntarily hand law enforcement my phone to show them my ID, have I just given them the authority to go through it?  
    Its part of Apple Wallet, you just bring up your DL on the lock screen as you do with boarding passes, rail tickets etc. You do not unlock your phone.
    Yes, but with boarding passes, rail tickets, etc, I’m not actually giving my phone to law enforcement.  Even with the TSA, I’m placing my phone on a scanner and retrieving it.  I don’t actually hand it to the agent.  If I’m pulled over by a cop, they currently will take my license back to their squad car while they pull up my information in their system.  Are the police going to have a handheld scanner so I don’t have to relinquish possession of my phone?  Regardless of one’s overall feelings towards law enforcement, one has to acknowledge that some of them are not to be trusted.

    Now if there was a ‘cop mode’ that could be quickly enabled from Control Center that only presents ID’s & insurance cards, I might use it if it also locks the phone requiring a passcode to unlock the phone.  I think some courts have ruled that bio-metrics aren’t even considered protected like a passcode is.  Cops can’t make you give them your passcode without a warrant, but I believe at least in some jurisdictions, they don’t need a warrant to make you use touchID or FaceID to unlock your phone.
    Apple Wallet can be visible from “outside” a locked iPhone. So you wouldn’t be handing an unlocked iPhone to anyone simply to allow them to scan in your ID to bring up your record in their system. And until states completely eliminate their physical cards in favor of electronics you always have the option of just handing an officer your physical card were such snooping a particular concern. Amtrak and NJTransit Tran staff have portable scammers now for reading tickets, so that’s certainly possible for a patrol officer to be issued. 

    edited September 2021 spock1234StrangeDays
  • Reply 20 of 63
    XedXed Posts: 1,434member
    JFC_PA said:
    d-rey said:
    loopless said:
    d-rey said:
    Love the idea. I already use Apple Pay everywhere I can.  How do the state laws address this, though?  If I voluntarily hand law enforcement my phone to show them my ID, have I just given them the authority to go through it?  
    Its part of Apple Wallet, you just bring up your DL on the lock screen as you do with boarding passes, rail tickets etc. You do not unlock your phone.
    Yes, but with boarding passes, rail tickets, etc, I’m not actually giving my phone to law enforcement.  Even with the TSA, I’m placing my phone on a scanner and retrieving it.  I don’t actually hand it to the agent.  If I’m pulled over by a cop, they currently will take my license back to their squad car while they pull up my information in their system.  Are the police going to have a handheld scanner so I don’t have to relinquish possession of my phone?  Regardless of one’s overall feelings towards law enforcement, one has to acknowledge that some of them are not to be trusted.

    Now if there was a ‘cop mode’ that could be quickly enabled from Control Center that only presents ID’s & insurance cards, I might use it if it also locks the phone requiring a passcode to unlock the phone.  I think some courts have ruled that bio-metrics aren’t even considered protected like a passcode is.  Cops can’t make you give them your passcode without a warrant, but I believe at least in some jurisdictions, they don’t need a warrant to make you use touchID or FaceID to unlock your phone.
    Apple Wallet can be visible from “outside” a locked iPhone. So you wouldn’t be handing an unlocked iPhone to anyone. 

    That's one thing I don't like about it. It's an either/or solution for a complex sent of Wallet items. I'd like to be able choose which items can be shown in Wallet when the Lock Screen is enabled.
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