Parallels Desktop 17.1 brings full Windows 11 support to macOS Monterey

Posted:
in macOS edited October 15
The latest version of virtualization tool Parallels Desktop now fully supports macOS Monterey, and significantly will mean Macs can run Windows 11.

Parallels Desktop 17.1 supports vTPMs to allow Windows 11 to run on Macs
Parallels Desktop 17.1 supports vTPMs to allow Windows 11 to run on Macs


Parallels Desktop previously became an Apple Silicon native app with version 17, but there remained issues over running Windows 11 on it. Microsoft's OS had certain minimum specifications, and key amongst those was the requirement for a Trusted Platform Module (TPM).

Specifically, Microsoft announced that it requires a TPM 2.0, and not all Macs do. However, Parallels says that it has created a virtual Trusted Platform Module (vTPM) to address the issue.

"Knowing that Parallels Desktop plays a critical role in enabling users to run the latest versions of Windows on their favorite Mac device today," said Parallels Vice President for Engineering, Elena Koryakina, "we've developed a simple solution to help all users upgrade to Windows 11 with the enablement of vTPMs by default on all Mac devices."

"The latest version of Parallels Desktop also builds on our customers' top requests," she continued, "with new gaming and 3D integrations to further enhance the user experience."





Parallels has previously used vTPMs, but only on specific, professional editions of the Desktop software. Now this new version will be included in the Standard, Pro and Business versions.

A Parallels technical blog describes how Desktop has implemented vTPMs, and how users can benefit from it.

Parallels Desktop 17 is a subscription app, starting at $80 per year for the Standard Edition. The Pro and Business Editions are available for $99.99 per year. Those who purchased a perpetual license for a previous version of Parallels Desktop can upgrade to Parallels Desktop 17 for $49.99.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    I have Windows 11 installed on my M1 Mac mini with Parallels and it runs very well as far as I have seen (not used it much).

    The only issue I have seen is getting it activated. Windows 11 is free to owners of Windows 10 and I have a license for 10 Pro but it was not installed on my ARM Mac for obvious reasons. Have a message in to Microsoft and will see.
    twokatmewOutdoorAppDeveloperravnorodomrundhvidwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 33
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,682member
    That's expensive.   But, if you need Windows -- say to run a specific program for work or school -- then it will be a choice between buying a second, new or newer laptop or paying for a Parallels subscription.  Economically, the decision is a no brainer.

    But, for those who simply "like" Windows or some unique feature of it, that subscription could be a show stopper.

    But, in either case:  The availability of this would make it a lot easier to buy a Mac knowing that if you need Windows down the road it will be available.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 33
    You can still buy a perpetual license of 17 as a onetime $99 purchase.  Author, please fact check yourself before posting.
    GeorgeBMacOctoMonkeydavgregwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,117member
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    edited October 15 rob53mcdaveKTRwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 33
    To be clear, Parallels Desktop only supports the ARM version of Windows 11,
    NOT the Intel version of Windows 11
    GeorgeBMacdewmeravnorodomneilmwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 33
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,718member
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    Has anyone tried emulating Secure Enclave? I just updated my Intel version of Parallels and will poke around to see if TPM has any settings.

    Not a good start. I updated my Parallels software, it installed the updated Parallel's stuff and here's what I got when checking for OS updates. Guess I'll need to check with Parallels on who to do. Did a quick check of all settings and nothing about TPM showed up. I'm running a late 2015 iMac so Parallels should be able to adjust things to get Windows 11 to work, especially with the TPM emulation.



    Ran Health Check and it says my CPU isn't supported. I went through Microsoft's list of supported Intel Core CPUs and there's a ton of them. It also says the PC must support Secure Boot and TPM 2.0 is not detected. I already submitted a service request (kind of, to their blog).




    edited October 15 roundaboutnowdewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 33
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    What does Windows 11 on ARM have to do with Intel / AMD TPM? 

    This is Windows 11 for ARM only. There has always been Software TPMs and Hypervisor TPMs (amongst the 5 types of TPM 2.0 Implementations).  

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 33
    I have been testing Windows for ARM on the M1 Mac Mini using Parallels over the past year. It works surprisingly well. The most impressive thing I have seen it do is to run Grand Theft Auto V with good frame rates and only very minor graphics glitches. This is not something I recommend doing as a game console will run rings around it but the fact that it is possible to run an extremely resource demanding game on a completely different processor architecture than it was designed for is impressive. It means that both Windows 11 ARM and Parallels are well designed. Parallels does run Windows 11 x86 just fine on x86 Macs.

    Here are some of the issues you will run into (not had a chance to test Parallels 11.1 yet):
    While Direct X is well supported in Parallels, you won't be able to run software that uses Vulkan or OpenGL. OpenCL GPGPU compute is not available either.
    Microsoft still won't be able to match the performance of Rosetta which takes advantages of additional instructions on Apple Silicon.
    While I was able to upgrade one of my VMs from Windows 10 Pro to Windows 11 Pro and retain the license. I don't see a way to transfer this license to Windows 11 ARM.
    In Parallels 11.0, it was very difficult to move a VM from one computer to another if the virtual TPM was used. This is something that Parallels could fix in a future release.

    GeorgeBMacneilmrundhvid
  • Reply 9 of 33
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,682member
    To be clear, Parallels Desktop only supports the ARM version of Windows 11,
    NOT the Intel version of Windows 11
    That could be a very big difference!
    I haven't seen any reviews of ARM based Windows 11 -- but if it follows tradition, it will be a cut down version -- at least until ARM processors become more common.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 33
    davgreg said:
    I have Windows 11 installed on my M1 Mac mini with Parallels and it runs very well as far as I have seen (not used it much).

    The only issue I have seen is getting it activated. Windows 11 is free to owners of Windows 10 and I have a license for 10 Pro but it was not installed on my ARM Mac for obvious reasons. Have a message in to Microsoft and will see.

    Try a Windoze 7 product key.  I don't know if it'll work on the ARM version, but it definitely will for Intel versions. 
  • Reply 11 of 33
    rob53 said:
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    Has anyone tried emulating Secure Enclave? I just updated my Intel version of Parallels and will poke around to see if TPM has any settings.

    Not a good start. I updated my Parallels software, it installed the updated Parallel's stuff and here's what I got when checking for OS updates. Guess I'll need to check with Parallels on who to do. Did a quick check of all settings and nothing about TPM showed up. I'm running a late 2015 iMac so Parallels should be able to adjust things to get Windows 11 to work, especially with the TPM emulation.



    Ran Health Check and it says my CPU isn't supported. I went through Microsoft's list of supported Intel Core CPUs and there's a ton of them. It also says the PC must support Secure Boot and TPM 2.0 is not detected. I already submitted a service request (kind of, to their blog).





    https://makmodo.com/how-to-bypass-windows-11-requirements/


  • Reply 12 of 33
    Right. Let's wait for VirtualBox that is free and Oracle behind it. Oracle has to do it as this is the foundation to their API and data integrations as I found out talking with their sales and engineering when we negotiated alternatives (Salesforce with Mulesoft). I skipped Parallels long time ago and as soon as VirtualBox matured.
  • Reply 13 of 33
    xav3xav3 Posts: 6member
    I find it strange that Parallels keeps supporting Windows 11 on ARM, while Microsoft does not support this use case. Therefore not an option for business. VMWARE does not support Windows 11 on ARM for this reasons. 
    williamlondondewmeGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 33
    KTRKTR Posts: 189member
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    That could possibly give hackers a BACK DOOR.  They can trick the user in to believing that there is a critical upgrade and to click on a bogus link and lock you out of your PC.............
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 33
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,718member
    darkvader said:
    rob53 said:
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    Has anyone tried emulating Secure Enclave? I just updated my Intel version of Parallels and will poke around to see if TPM has any settings.

    Not a good start. I updated my Parallels software, it installed the updated Parallel's stuff and here's what I got when checking for OS updates. Guess I'll need to check with Parallels on who to do. Did a quick check of all settings and nothing about TPM showed up. I'm running a late 2015 iMac so Parallels should be able to adjust things to get Windows 11 to work, especially with the TPM emulation.



    Ran Health Check and it says my CPU isn't supported. I went through Microsoft's list of supported Intel Core CPUs and there's a ton of them. It also says the PC must support Secure Boot and TPM 2.0 is not detected. I already submitted a service request (kind of, to their blog).





    https://makmodo.com/how-to-bypass-windows-11-requirements/


    I checked it out and this link is for a Windows 11 installation so I'll have to wait to try. The notes say "To be specific, it helps to bypass TPM 2.0, Secure Boot, and minimum RAM requirements." The biggest problem I'll have is faking the CPU. There are a ton of Intel Core CPUs supported, just not the one I have and I'm wondering if Microsoft has decided they will not allow any Mac-used Intel Core CPU model. As you can see I have a quad core i5 and while Microsoft allows these they don't allow any in the 6000 range.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 33
    rob53 said:
    darkvader said:
    rob53 said:
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    Has anyone tried emulating Secure Enclave? I just updated my Intel version of Parallels and will poke around to see if TPM has any settings.

    Not a good start. I updated my Parallels software, it installed the updated Parallel's stuff and here's what I got when checking for OS updates. Guess I'll need to check with Parallels on who to do. Did a quick check of all settings and nothing about TPM showed up. I'm running a late 2015 iMac so Parallels should be able to adjust things to get Windows 11 to work, especially with the TPM emulation.



    Ran Health Check and it says my CPU isn't supported. I went through Microsoft's list of supported Intel Core CPUs and there's a ton of them. It also says the PC must support Secure Boot and TPM 2.0 is not detected. I already submitted a service request (kind of, to their blog).





    https://makmodo.com/how-to-bypass-windows-11-requirements/


    I checked it out and this link is for a Windows 11 installation so I'll have to wait to try. The notes say "To be specific, it helps to bypass TPM 2.0, Secure Boot, and minimum RAM requirements." The biggest problem I'll have is faking the CPU. There are a ton of Intel Core CPUs supported, just not the one I have and I'm wondering if Microsoft has decided they will not allow any Mac-used Intel Core CPU model. As you can see I have a quad core i5 and while Microsoft allows these they don't allow any in the 6000 range.
    I rather think that MS decided to just draw a line in the sand and say that any processor more than five years old is unsupported.

    Interestingly enough, the Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_processors) shows the "Latest" group of processors to be 7th generation through 11th generation. So maybe Intel will only provide support for those and MS is unwilling to shoulder that burden either.

    My gut feeling is that this decision is business-driven more than technology-driven.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 33
    xav3 said:
    I find it strange that Parallels keeps supporting Windows 11 on ARM, while Microsoft does not support this use case. Therefore not an option for business. VMWARE does not support Windows 11 on ARM for this reasons. 
    VMware does not support ARM, period!

    VMware Fusion does not run on any M1 Mac.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,117member
    rob53 said:
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    Has anyone tried emulating Secure Enclave? I just updated my Intel version of Parallels and will poke around to see if TPM has any settings.

    Not a good start. I updated my Parallels software, it installed the updated Parallel's stuff and here's what I got when checking for OS updates. Guess I'll need to check with Parallels on who to do. Did a quick check of all settings and nothing about TPM showed up. I'm running a late 2015 iMac so Parallels should be able to adjust things to get Windows 11 to work, especially with the TPM emulation.



    Ran Health Check and it says my CPU isn't supported. I went through Microsoft's list of supported Intel Core CPUs and there's a ton of them. It also says the PC must support Secure Boot and TPM 2.0 is not detected. I already submitted a service request (kind of, to their blog).




    You can’t easily emulate a black box. It takes a lot of work. You have to read the inputs, vary them in a predictable way, and monitor the outputs. That what Was done to IVM’s Bios many years ago, leading to IBM clones. But that wasn’t heavily encrypted. Apple/s hasn’t been broken into, and no body outside those working on it know much about the signals going in and out.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,117member
    ctt_zh said:
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    What does Windows 11 on ARM have to do with Intel / AMD TPM? 

    This is Windows 11 for ARM only. There has always been Software TPMs and Hypervisor TPMs (amongst the 5 types of TPM 2.0 Implementations).  

    It has everything to do with it. Microsoft has stated several times now, that TPM 2 is required to install Win 11 on a machine. Since no ARM chip has that, you can’t DIRECTLY install even the ARM version on any ARM machine, including Apple’s. I’ve already said that software can work around it, so you don’t seem to have read my entire post. I also said, not in those words, that it’s a flaw.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 33
    melgross said:
    ctt_zh said:
    melgross said:
    Just to clear something up that some people might be thinking about, Apple has had a TPM for years, it’s called the Secure Enclave. It’s just not compatible with the TPM  used by AMD and Intel, and Apple will never open it up for third party use.

    but this development shows that the TPM, as used by AMD and Intel, at least, can easily be worked around by software, so its value is questionable.
    What does Windows 11 on ARM have to do with Intel / AMD TPM? 

    This is Windows 11 for ARM only. There has always been Software TPMs and Hypervisor TPMs (amongst the 5 types of TPM 2.0 Implementations).  

    It has everything to do with it. Microsoft has stated several times now, that TPM 2 is required to install Win 11 on a machine. Since no ARM chip has that, you can’t DIRECTLY install even the ARM version on any ARM machine, including Apple’s. I’ve already said that software can work around it, so you don’t seem to have read my entire post. I also said, not in those words, that it’s a flaw.
    Apologies if I'm misunderstanding but how is it a flaw when it's by design? The ARM-based Surface Pro X has a Firmware TPM chip. The Hypervisor TPM (vTPM) is a software solution to do the same job as the Firmware TPM Chip. A Hypervisor TPM is a recognised and accepted implementation of the TPM 2.0 spec. Where is the flaw?

    And I still fail to see how the Intel / AMD TPM implementations have anything to do with Windows 11 on ARM. I did read your entire post but it's not clear.
    edited October 16 watto_cobra
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