AirTag data crucial to recovery of man's lost luggage

Posted:
in General Discussion
One man used his Apple AirTags to track his missing luggage and make a compelling argument for the airline that lost it to get involved.




Elliot Sharod traveled to South Africa for his wedding in April. However, when he arrived back in Dublin, the starting point of his trip, his bags had mysteriously vanished.

The three missing bags contained sentimental objects from his wedding -- handwritten notes from guests, wedding invitations, itineraries. However, they also each had another item -- an AirTag.

The Apple-designed item tracker is small enough to hide nearly anywhere. Sharod hid his in a sock.

Sharod has been actively tracking his bags during his trip home, noting that he had a "robust" itinerary that took the couple through multiple airports.

The bags never made it to Dublin. Instead, they wound up in Frankfurt, Germany, where they were transferred to a gate area.

Sharod reached out to the airline, Aer Lingus, to inform them that the bags were missing. Aer Lingus responded, saying they would route the bags from Frankfurt to London to deliver them to the Sharods' home in Surrey.

Eventually, two of the bags did show up, but a third is still missing. Sharod notes that the bag was delivered to a location in London, then moved three streets to a different location days later.

After failed attempts to locate the bag by the Aer Lingus, Sharod has taken to posting updates on his Twitter about the experience.

He called the airline's response to the situation appalling and made a PowerPoint presentation highlighting the locations where the bag had been tracked.

Hi @AerLingus - perhaps a PowerPoint presentation on the journey you've sent my lost/stolen bag on will help?

I've told you multiple times where it is and you're doing nothing about it.

This has been a shocking experience with you pic.twitter.com/105BdEM7MU

-- AirTag Adventurer (@aviosAdventurer)


After CNN picked up the story, Sharod received his missing bag on the evening of April 22.

We have the bag!

Goodnight all

-- AirTag Adventurer (@aviosAdventurer)


Apple introduced the long-awaited AirTag at the "Spring Loaded" event in April 2021. The new devices are meant to aid users in tracking objects that otherwise have no smart features, like backpacks and keys. They utilize the Ultra-Wideband chip in the latest iPhones to find lost devices with precision accuracy.

AirTags costs $39 for a single device. A pack of four is available for $99. Customers can engrave their AirTag with four text characters or select from a handful of emojis.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    amar99amar99 Posts: 150member
    In which country do they cost $39 each, Canada? In the US they're $29 each or $99 for a 4-pack.
    pulseimagestwokatmewwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 20
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,007member
    amar99 said:
    In which country do they cost $39 each, Canada? In the US they're $29 each or $99 for a 4-pack.
    Article clearly states the individual lives in Dublin, Ireland.  So unless it's a misprint, he probably purchased them there for that price.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 20
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,007member
    I do exactly this with my bags.  On a recent trip to Honduras, one of my pieces of luggage never made it to baggage claim and I had to make a connecting flight to go overseas.  Thanks to my AirTag, I was able to quickly find my luggage elsewhere in the airport.  Apparently it was on a different flight for whatever reason.  My friends traveling with me have never seen/heard of AirTags and were astonished with how easily I found my luggage.

    Best piece of tech I've owned.
    pulseimagesqwerty52twokatmewravnorodomsocalbrianviclauyycleavingthebiggwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 20
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,181member
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    lkrupp
  • Reply 5 of 20
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    sflocal said:
    amar99 said:
    In which country do they cost $39 each, Canada? In the US they're $29 each or $99 for a 4-pack.
    Article clearly states the individual lives in Dublin, Ireland.  So unless it's a misprint, he probably purchased them there for that price.
    Ireland do not use the $, it's a typo.
    fred1slow n easy
  • Reply 6 of 20
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    He is not tracking people, he is tracking something that happens to be his personal property. There is nothing illegal about posting a picture of a building on line. Nowhere does he suggest any suspicious activity in his video.

    I admire your tracking skills but equally you could probably do the same for any house picture posted on the internet, an address you see online, or you walk past in real life. That information is just out there. In the UK if privacy is an issue most platforms give an option to blur your home and even remove personal data on line.

    Your concern has no relevance as to whether or not there was an AirTag at that location and relates to almost the entire concept of privacy of information posted on line.

    Xedsocalbrianslow n easyviclauyycbageljoeymuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 7 of 20
    sflocal said:
    amar99 said:
    In which country do they cost $39 each, Canada? In the US they're $29 each or $99 for a 4-pack.
    Article clearly states the individual lives in Dublin, Ireland.  So unless it's a misprint, he probably purchased them there for that price.

    Ireland uses the Euro. Apple Ireland sells airtags at €35 each or €119 for 4. Currently that translates to $37.80 and $128.51, so I can understand the $39 as a  rounded conversion from € to $ (if that is what they were trying to do). This is the US edition of Apple insider, so presenting US pricing would make sense - the correct US 4-pack pricing makes me think it was simply a typo, a 3 typed instead of a 2. They are right next to each other after all.

    Shame  on your proof reading though!
    charlesatlaswatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 20
    XedXed Posts: 1,526member
    stuartf said:
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    He is not tracking people, he is tracking something that happens to be his personal property. There is nothing illegal about posting a picture of a building on line. Nowhere does he suggest any suspicious activity in his video.

    I admire your tracking skills but equally you could probably do the same for any house picture posted on the internet, an address you see online, or you walk past in real life. That information is just out there. In the UK if privacy is an issue most platforms give an option to blur your home and even remove personal data on line.

    Your concern has no relevance as to whether or not there was an AirTag at that location and relates to almost the entire concept of privacy of information posted on line.
    It is funny that an article about lost luggage someone claims that he's tracking people and suggesting AirTags aren't legal. I guess some people just try to make issues out of nothing. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 

    I just bought another 4-pack since Costco is the best price for them and has them in stock again. I only wish that you can share their use with others, at least on your family plan.
    edited April 23 socalbrianviclauyycstuartfNaiyaswatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 20
    caskeycaskey Posts: 26member
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    And where in this article does this guy track anyone or anything other than his own mishandled property? No names were given, no guilt was implied...this is his bag. Don't make drama where none exists.
    socalbrianslow n easyunbeliever2watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 20
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,181member
    Xed said:
    stuartf said:
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    He is not tracking people, he is tracking something that happens to be his personal property. There is nothing illegal about posting a picture of a building on line. Nowhere does he suggest any suspicious activity in his video.

    I admire your tracking skills but equally you could probably do the same for any house picture posted on the internet, an address you see online, or you walk past in real life. That information is just out there. In the UK if privacy is an issue most platforms give an option to blur your home and even remove personal data on line.

    Your concern has no relevance as to whether or not there was an AirTag at that location and relates to almost the entire concept of privacy of information posted on line.
    It is funny that an article about lost luggage someone claims that he's tracking people and suggesting AirTags aren't legal. I guess some people just try to make issues out of nothing. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 
    If you both think it's "legal" to post personal information about people, then do you oppose Twitter's policy against posting personal information about other people without their permission?...
    Private information: You may not publish or post other people's private information (such as home phone number and address) without their express authorization and permission. 
    He posted the guy's address and a photo of his house on Twitter without the person's permission. That's not only against Twitter's rules, it could be considered a form of doxxing or harassment. Regardless of the legality, he violated the website's rules and could potentially be banned by Twitter for that violation. 

    And by no means did I say in my post that AirTags aren't legal in and of themselves. Some people misquote others badly, probably because their arguments are otherwise weak. All I said was that I'm not sure if it should be legal to post detailed personal information about other people, especially if they are not guilty of anything.
  • Reply 11 of 20
    XedXed Posts: 1,526member
    Xed said:
    stuartf said:
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    He is not tracking people, he is tracking something that happens to be his personal property. There is nothing illegal about posting a picture of a building on line. Nowhere does he suggest any suspicious activity in his video.

    I admire your tracking skills but equally you could probably do the same for any house picture posted on the internet, an address you see online, or you walk past in real life. That information is just out there. In the UK if privacy is an issue most platforms give an option to blur your home and even remove personal data on line.

    Your concern has no relevance as to whether or not there was an AirTag at that location and relates to almost the entire concept of privacy of information posted on line.
    It is funny that an article about lost luggage someone claims that he's tracking people and suggesting AirTags aren't legal. I guess some people just try to make issues out of nothing. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 
    If you both think it's "legal" to post personal information about people, then do you oppose Twitter's policy against posting personal information about other people without their permission?...
    Private information: You may not publish or post other people's private information (such as home phone number and address) without their express authorization and permission. 
    He posted the guy's address and a photo of his house on Twitter without the person's permission. That's not only against Twitter's rules, it could be considered a form of doxxing or harassment. Regardless of the legality, he violated the website's rules and could potentially be banned by Twitter for that violation. 

    And by no means did I say in my post that AirTags aren't legal in and of themselves. Some people misquote others badly, probably because their arguments are otherwise weak. All I said was that I'm not sure if it should be legal to post detailed personal information about other people, especially if they are not guilty of anything.
    1) Whose phone number or address did he post on Twitter?

    2) It's not a question of legality,, but if you think he violated Twitter's terms then report the post. Good luck with that.
    edited April 23 socalbrianslow n easycharlesatlaswatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    sandorsandor Posts: 650member
    sflocal said:
    amar99 said:
    In which country do they cost $39 each, Canada? In the US they're $29 each or $99 for a 4-pack.
    Article clearly states the individual lives in Dublin, Ireland.  So unless it's a misprint, he probably purchased them there for that price.

    Then shouldn't they quote it in the country's currency?

    €35
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    Mac4macMac4mac Posts: 12member
    sflocal said:
    amar99 said:
    In which country do they cost $39 each, Canada? In the US they're $29 each or $99 for a 4-pack.
    Article clearly states the individual lives in Dublin, Ireland.  So unless it's a misprint, he probably purchased them there for that price.

    Ireland uses the Euro. Apple Ireland sells airtags at €35 each or €119 for 4. Currently that translates to $37.80 and $128.51, so I can understand the $39 as a  rounded conversion from € to $ (if that is what they were trying to do). This is the US edition of Apple insider, so presenting US pricing would make sense - the correct US 4-pack pricing makes me think it was simply a typo, a 3 typed instead of a 2. They are right next to each other after all.

    Shame  on your proof reading though!
    This isn’t a “US version of Apple Insider”…. There is only 1 version, and it’s an international version…. (I am in Australia… should be enough proof!) 

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 20
    Xed said:
    stuartf said:
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    He is not tracking people, he is tracking something that happens to be his personal property. There is nothing illegal about posting a picture of a building on line. Nowhere does he suggest any suspicious activity in his video.

    I admire your tracking skills but equally you could probably do the same for any house picture posted on the internet, an address you see online, or you walk past in real life. That information is just out there. In the UK if privacy is an issue most platforms give an option to blur your home and even remove personal data on line.

    Your concern has no relevance as to whether or not there was an AirTag at that location and relates to almost the entire concept of privacy of information posted on line.
    It is funny that an article about lost luggage someone claims that he's tracking people and suggesting AirTags aren't legal. I guess some people just try to make issues out of nothing. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 
    If you both think it's "legal" to post personal information about people, then do you oppose Twitter's policy against posting personal information about other people without their permission?...
    Private information: You may not publish or post other people's private information (such as home phone number and address) without their express authorization and permission. 
    He posted the guy's address and a photo of his house on Twitter without the person's permission. That's not only against Twitter's rules, it could be considered a form of doxxing or harassment. Regardless of the legality, he violated the website's rules and could potentially be banned by Twitter for that violation. 

    And by no means did I say in my post that AirTags aren't legal in and of themselves. Some people misquote others badly, probably because their arguments are otherwise weak. All I said was that I'm not sure if it should be legal to post detailed personal information about other people, especially if they are not guilty of anything.
    You are making it sound like in your post that he guy who lost his luggage is blaming the guy that owns the house where the luggage was sent to. He is not. He is blaming the airline who sent the luggage to that house. All he is doing is explaining that the airline sent his luggage to the wrong address. There is nothing wrong with that. He doesn't mention who owns that house or any information about that house at all other than the address. You can go to Google Maps and get the addresses of millions of different homes. So what? No names of owners, no phone numbers. How is this relevant?
    bageljoeymuthuk_vanalingamcharlesatlaswatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 15 of 20
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 599member
    I'm not entirely sure that it should be legal for someone to track other people like this and then post the tracking data online, especially when the person being tracked may be guilty of nothing. I'm fairly good at geo-locating places/people and I think there's a better than even chance I could find the name of the person who was handed the bag using this data. But I wouldn't want to post the name of a potentially innocent person on the Internet, because it just doesn't seem right.
    You have to be kidding, aren't you?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    fred1fred1 Posts: 1,012member
    This is the main reason why I wanted AirTags - I travel a lot and like to know that my checked bag reached the airport with me. There were other options, but all of them required an expensive subscription. 

    As for the currency, if it’s a conversion from euros to dollars, it really should say that they cost *the equivalent of $39*. 
    ihatescreennameswatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 20
    KBChicagoKBChicago Posts: 21unconfirmed, member
    So  great.   I  did  this  with our bags over spring  break.  It was  great  piece  of mind to  see them on  our flight, each  way.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,551member
    These AirTags stories are very intriguing and make a very compelling case for the product. Fortunately, I don't travel by air nearly as much as I used to but it would be cool to hear more success stories about how these products are otherwise being used effectively. When they first came out people were hanging them on pets and other such possessions in addition to the ubiquitous car keys use case. Unfortunately I haven't seen too many stories other than the one here, and of course the stalking related ones, that demonstrate the wider appeal of the product. This product is very interesting technologically and seems to have tremendous potential but I'm waiting to see where it really takes off. Apple typically does not invest in niche products so there must be many more stories to tell.
    indieshackqwerty52watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 20
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,274member
    To those writing that the „$39“ is a currency conversion issue — how are you missing that the four pack is NOT $99, as stated, but well over $120 after conversion? 

    This is just a typo of „39“ for „29“; that’s all. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 20
    Ireland uses the Euro. Apple Ireland sells airtags at €35 each or €119 for 4. Currently, that translates to $37.80 and $128.51, so I can understand the $39 as a  rounded conversion from € to $ (if that is what they were trying to do). This is the US edition of Apple insider, so presenting US pricing would make sense - the correct US 4-pack pricing makes me think it was simply a typo, a 3 typed instead of a 2. They are right next to each other after all.

    Shame on your proof reading though!

    edited April 29
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