Japan law will require Apple to allow alternate iPhone app stores

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 42
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,836member

    spheric said:
    THOSE MEDDLING EU BUREAUCRATS JUST HAVE IT IN FOR US CORPORATIONS! 

    They can't innovate themselves, so they have to impose draconian and ridiculous…oh wait. 

    Japan. 

    Huh. 

    sorry

    Nintendo and Sony want a store within the Apple ecosystem, at no charge…….
    williamlondon9secondkox2Alex1N
  • Reply 22 of 42
    ajmasajmas Posts: 600member
    Knowing how well the Amazon Fire store was managed, I am foreseeing a future of fake apps and malware. Of course, I may be wrong, but unless any of this regulation has language for safeguards, then I’ll watching very carefully. 

    Right now it is the 18+ apps that have the most to gain from this new legislation. 
    Alex1N
  • Reply 23 of 42
    leighrleighr Posts: 253member
    What about other devices that have their own App Store. I’m thinking Sony PlayStation, XBox, all Smart TVs. What about streaming - should Netflix be forced to allow content from other sources? I only hope that if Apple is forced to allow side loading and crimware stores, that it voids all AppleCare and warranty privileges, similar to car manufacturers stating that use of non-genuine parts voids the manufacturer’s warranty. Why should Apple be forced to fix someone’s phone because an idiot downloaded malware from a dodgy store...
    williamlondonJaiOh81Alex1Naderutter
  • Reply 24 of 42
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,836member
    JMaille said:
    I wonder if anyone at Apple has been paying attention to what Reddit did recently?  How much will it cost for developers that don't use the Apple App Store to use the APIs that Apple has developed?
    Reddit is simply charging the cost of using their infrastructure, no more freebies.
    williamlondon9secondkox2
  • Reply 25 of 42
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,331member
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 26 of 42
    chutzpahchutzpah Posts: 392member
    jdw said:
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    Are you suggesting that driving above the speed limit shouldn't be against the law? 
    williamlondon9secondkox2Alex1N
  • Reply 27 of 42
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,655member
    jdw said:
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    There are lots of laws that are not fit for their times and they are often weeded out or modified.

    Some inevitably slip through the net.

    Depending on your opinion, some laws may even not be required in the first place or may make certain problems worse. 

    That's the nature of the beast and, just like with politics, you can't please everyone. 

    But... 

    Why is it that large majorities of the EU are happy with their 'Nanny State'? 

    We have Eurobarometer to keep a finger on the pulse of citizens within the EU. 

    In terms of legislation specifically, I think Brexit could provide an excellent opportunity to grade the quality of EU legislation. 

    Let's see how UK citizens do with the revision of EU laws post Brexit. 

    All I hear from my Brexit voting family (all except one) is that everything has gone downhill. 

    The latest complaint has been about sea and river pollution. An utterly scandalous affair. 

    A marine biologist friend of mine tells me the UK government altered laws to reduce protections on how raw sewage gets into waterways and now you literally get into the sea, lake or river with a very high risk of leaving it carrying an infection. 

    The fact that more and more authorities are looking at the biggest digital players and not liking how they behave, should be indicative of a growing problem that needs addressing. 

    Speed limits are there for a reason. 

    In my immediate area it is 30km.

    On motorways limits are dynamic and can change due to the weather, pollution, congestion or whatever. 

    There are helicopters, radars etc to pick out abusers and information signs that tell you how fast you are traveling. 

    I have never heard of anyone being penalised for traveling at 41 in an area where 40 is the limit. 






    muthuk_vanalingamAlex1N
  • Reply 28 of 42
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,554member
    foad said:
    spheric said:
    THOSE MEDDLING EU BUREAUCRATS JUST HAVE IT IN FOR US CORPORATIONS! 

    They can't innovate themselves, so they have to impose draconian and ridiculous…oh wait. 

    Japan. 

    Huh. 

    sorry
    You joke, but actually, Japan has lost a ton of market and mindshare in the overall tech market at the hands of Apple, Google and Samsung. Sony was once super prominent in the mobile space, and but now they release highly niche phones that are focused heavily on photography and videography. Same goes for their music players. Even the PlayStation business pales in comparison. 

    These acts have very little to do with doing things that benefit consumers.
    Sony was at the top of my mind because of some recent announcement, where they supplied some key technology that actually constrains availability of the product… 
  • Reply 29 of 42
    danox said:

    spheric said:
    THOSE MEDDLING EU BUREAUCRATS JUST HAVE IT IN FOR US CORPORATIONS! 

    They can't innovate themselves, so they have to impose draconian and ridiculous…oh wait. 

    Japan. 

    Huh. 

    sorry

    Nintendo and Sony want a store within the Apple ecosystem, at no charge…….
    This should be applied to Nintendo and Sony as well to keep it fair.
    Across the board for all online stores. Microsoft. Garmin and even V-tech just to name a few.
    williamlondondanox9secondkox2Alex1N
  • Reply 30 of 42
    Lower App prices. Why do these regulators always promote this lie?

    When Apple and Google dropped fees to 15% for smaller developers, did they drop prices? No, they kept the extra profit for themselves.

    The developers promoting this (like Epic) are only in it for the money. They don’t care about small developers or anyone else. They just want a bigger cut. App prices won’t drop, but large developer profits will go up. Small developers won’t gain a thing from 3rd party stores, and it would likely cost them more since now they’ll have to handle things that Apple does for them now (for free).
    williamlondondanoxAlex1N
  • Reply 31 of 42
    looplessloopless Posts: 327member
    As an app developer, I’ll say it again, what Apple does for their 15% is incredible value. Buying software and promoting it was a mess before app stores. I can sell my app in Brazil , and the proceeds just appear in my bank account. Third party app stores are not going to do it for free-unless it’s crappy malware they just want to get on your device.
    williamlondondanoxleighrAlex1N
  • Reply 32 of 42
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,698member
    JMaille said:
    I wonder if anyone at Apple has been paying attention to what Reddit did recently?  How much will it cost for developers that don't use the Apple App Store to use the APIs that Apple has developed?
    Seriously. Apple should charge an arm and leg. they spent tons of money developing this stuff, not just so others can waltz on in and steal their work.

    Then they should also charge hosting fees for hosting the stores on their servers. Suppose some lame law requires the other company to be able to use their own servers. In that case, Apple should have a warning pop-up mentioning that the customer is leaving the safety and security of the Apple ecosystem and that any and all resulting issues must be resolved through that party's system.
    edited June 2023 leighrAlex1N
  • Reply 33 of 42
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,698member
    chutzpah said:
    jdw said:
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    Are you suggesting that driving above the speed limit shouldn't be against the law? 
    What the heck? Reading comprehension man! 

    The idea they put out there was there is the letter of the law and there is the spirit of the law. something every law student and enforcement personnel is taught - or at least use to be taught. 41 in a 40 is not breaking the spirit of the law, nor is jaywalking to save a child from getting run over - though they break the letter of the law. I was pulled over years ago for going 2 miles over the limit. I contested as I have a good driving record and it is so easy to go over the limit by a mile or two especially when you're. going with the flow. the officer didn't bother to show up because he knew what was going to happen - the judge dismissed the ticket. no traffic school, nothing, 

    Back to the issue of these nations trying. to force Apple to give away their business, they are clearly not thinking all the way through. they feel. that since Apple is so successful, they owe everyone else, rather than putting each company on an even playing field. Robin Hood politics is still stealing. Sucks to be the successful guy. Who knew success would be a punishable crime these days. 
    edited June 2023
  • Reply 34 of 42
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,698member
    Apple could pull out of Japan and let them live with their smorgasbord of clunky electronics amongst some actually good Sony stuff and deny them the truly excellent experience that is Apple. I'd bet the consumers would revolt and come to Apple's defense themselves...
  • Reply 35 of 42
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,836member
    In the end small and medium size developers won’t win they will just be charged the real price of what it cost to run store infrastructure by the owners of the store, the big companies can afford to pay upfront no skin off their back, the small and medium size companies will be left in the cold. Evil: Sweeney Todd (of Epic fame) is only looking after himself. The ever helpful world governments are just hastening the process at the bidding of the upper gentry class.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweeney_Todd

    One day soon, Google will get the bright idea to charge all the people who upload videos to their site upfront before anyone views it, instead of taking something out on the backend based upon views, it’s coming.
    edited June 2023
  • Reply 36 of 42
    chutzpahchutzpah Posts: 392member
    chutzpah said:
    jdw said:
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    Are you suggesting that driving above the speed limit shouldn't be against the law? 
    What the heck? Reading comprehension man! 

    The idea they put out there was there is the letter of the law and there is the spirit of the law. something every law student and enforcement personnel is taught - or at least use to be taught. 41 in a 40 is not breaking the spirit of the law, nor is jaywalking to save a child from getting run over - though they break the letter of the law. I was pulled over years ago for going 2 miles over the limit. I contested as I have a good driving record and it is so easy to go over the limit by a mile or two especially when you're. going with the flow. the officer didn't bother to show up because he knew what was going to happen - the judge dismissed the ticket. no traffic school, nothing, 
    Sounds like everything worked out fine and I have no idea what the point of your ranting is.
    williamlondonAlex1N
  • Reply 37 of 42
    williamlondonwilliamlondon Posts: 1,324member
    chutzpah said:
    chutzpah said:
    jdw said:
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    Are you suggesting that driving above the speed limit shouldn't be against the law? 
    What the heck? Reading comprehension man! 

    The idea they put out there was there is the letter of the law and there is the spirit of the law. something every law student and enforcement personnel is taught - or at least use to be taught. 41 in a 40 is not breaking the spirit of the law, nor is jaywalking to save a child from getting run over - though they break the letter of the law. I was pulled over years ago for going 2 miles over the limit. I contested as I have a good driving record and it is so easy to go over the limit by a mile or two especially when you're. going with the flow. the officer didn't bother to show up because he knew what was going to happen - the judge dismissed the ticket. no traffic school, nothing, 
    Sounds like everything worked out fine and I have no idea what the point of your ranting is.
    Excellent candidate for blocking, finally did and my feed is much nicer now.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 38 of 42
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,654member
    What developers who complain about Apple taking 30% forget is that back in the days of packaged software, distributors like Ingram MicroD took 55% to 60%.  And Apple absorbs the credit card risk and fees.  

    What I think Apple needs to do is certify apps from their site so consumers know that the other site apps are not. 
    williamlondonAlex1Naderutter
  • Reply 39 of 42
    chutzpahchutzpah Posts: 392member
    chutzpah said:
    chutzpah said:
    jdw said:
    The fundamental problem with lawmakers is the fact they make laws and never take any old ones away.  The only built cruft atop cruft.  They sit around twiddling thumbs until somebody screams: "Hey!  We should regulate that popular thing too!"  Then they cite stupid Europeans who always lead the world in such foolishness, and the world continues to go downhill.

    Of course, lawmakers aren't the only ones to blame.  The ultimate blame falls upon the people in free societies who vote the regulation monsters into office.

    Looking at the bigger picture, we have so many laws on the books today that everyone is made into a law breaker.  You can't get around it.  Ever drive 41 in a 40 zone?  You're a law breaker!  The quest toward "the greater good" by the creation of new laws results in everyone eventually breaking a law of some sort.  And depending on how strictly laws are enforced in a given country, that can be very, very bad for people in general.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say it's a rather horrible situation right now.  And yet, imagine where the world will be a century from now.  I shudder at the thought, but the up side is that I won't be around then to be harmed by it.

    I've lived in Japan since 1994.  The sad thing is, the general populace never rises up against government stupidity and wins.  They basically just trust the lawmakers to do the right thing, which again, amounts to nothing more that and endless stream of new laws, which slowly but surely chip away at corporate and individual liberty.  Quite sad.
    Are you suggesting that driving above the speed limit shouldn't be against the law? 
    What the heck? Reading comprehension man! 

    The idea they put out there was there is the letter of the law and there is the spirit of the law. something every law student and enforcement personnel is taught - or at least use to be taught. 41 in a 40 is not breaking the spirit of the law, nor is jaywalking to save a child from getting run over - though they break the letter of the law. I was pulled over years ago for going 2 miles over the limit. I contested as I have a good driving record and it is so easy to go over the limit by a mile or two especially when you're. going with the flow. the officer didn't bother to show up because he knew what was going to happen - the judge dismissed the ticket. no traffic school, nothing, 
    Sounds like everything worked out fine and I have no idea what the point of your ranting is.
    Excellent candidate for blocking, finally did and my feed is much nicer now.
    Finally!  :D
  • Reply 40 of 42

    Apple's business model is no longer compatible with the world. It's time for change.

    Apple has been making tremendous investments into iOS and its other operating systems, and it's the App Store commission fees that pay for that. Once apps start getting distributed through alternative app stores, that revenue disappears.

    Presently, iCloud offers a lot of value to developers, such as the ability to sync data across devices for a given app. If a developer chooses to distribute through an alternative app store, it's unreasonable for them to also have "free" access to the iCloud platform for their app. Who will pay for that if they aren't?

    So now developers will implement their own solutions/servers to do what iCloud magically does for them, and along with that will come increased vulnerabilities and risks to users.

    We're entering a new world...
    If Apple starts charging for iCloud access the fee will likely be passed to the end user.
    williamlondon
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