Apple finally sends 'batterygate' checks to iPhone owners

Posted:
in iPhone

Following its 2020 $500 million settlement to end a U.S. class action lawsuit over the iPhone "batterygate" saga, participants are finally starting to get payments.

An iPhone battery
An iPhone battery



The 2020 agreement by Apple to settle one of its so-called Batterygate lawsuits in the United States effectively ended the legal activity concerning Apple's attempt to maintain the stability of its older iPhone models. Over three years later, the checks are finally being issued to class members.

The settlement was agreed upon in May 2020, with affected owners of select iPhone models who submitted claims for the settlement by October 6, 2020 able to receive payments. Under the proposal at the time, Apple would make a minimum payment of $310 million and a maximum of $500 million, depending on the number of submitted claims.

In X posts first spotted by MacRumors, owners who applied for the settlement were starting to receive notifications of payments. Images show the settlement payments to be $92.17 per claim.

The list of affected customers include U.S. residents who owned an iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, or an iPhone SE that ran iOS 10.2.1 or later, or for the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, ran iOS 11.2 or later before December 21, 2017.

The settlement is actually applying to dozens of identical cases that were consolidated in 2018, with Apple accused of breaking various laws due to its actions, referred to as Batterygate.

Apple released an iOS feature in iOS 10.2.1 and later that temporarily throttled chips under heavy loads. The throttling was intended to mitigate the effects of aging iPhone batteries, minimizing the chance of unexpected shutdowns.

The lawsuits claimed Apple didn't adequately inform users about the feature before implementing it, prompting complaints of reduced hardware performance and suggestions of planned obsolescence.

Apple apologized to iPhone owners in 2017 and reduced the out-of-warranty battery replacement charge to $29 for affected users.

While the U.S. Batterygate lawsuit is finally concluding with payouts, Apple is still having to deal with the issue elsewhere. In the UK in May, it attempted to stop another Batterygate lawsuit, one demanding $2 billion from the iPhone maker.



Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    It wasn’t limited to aging batteries. The voltage supply problems could happen with brand new batteries that were being used at charge levels below 20% or used in cold temperatures. That’s just the way that lithium ion technology works when it’s at the smartphone size level.

    This was a lawsuit that never really had any merit. 
    stompysdw2001watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 19
    foregoneconclusion said:  This was a lawsuit that never really had any merit. 

    Well dammmmmn, imagine how much time, effort and many multi millions of dollars Apple could’ve saved if you were on their legal team!!!
    🤣🤣🥱🥱🙄🙄 🤦🏻‍♂️🤦🏻‍♂️
    pulseimagesmuthuk_vanalingamgrandact73beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 3 of 19
    looplessloopless Posts: 339member
    It wasn’t limited to aging batteries. The voltage supply problems could happen with brand new batteries that were being used at charge levels below 20% or used in cold temperatures. That’s just the way that lithium ion technology works when it’s at the smartphone size level.

    This was a lawsuit that never really had any merit. 
    He is correct, it had no merit and was an issue whipped up into a frenzy by the tech press and various government entities looking for a excuse to bring down Apple.

    The 10.2.1 iOS release notes DO mention the throttling aka power management .... but no-one reads release notes,.

    "iOS 10.2.1

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.

    It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone."



    foregoneconclusionwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 4 of 19
    danoxdanox Posts: 3,101member
    Paying, flushing money down the drain because the brains of the system AI (fashionable word) in short the OS did its job as it was supposed to do monitoring and controlling the components of the device over the course of a working life time. :smile: 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 19
    loopless said:
    It wasn’t limited to aging batteries. The voltage supply problems could happen with brand new batteries that were being used at charge levels below 20% or used in cold temperatures. That’s just the way that lithium ion technology works when it’s at the smartphone size level.

    This was a lawsuit that never really had any merit. 
    He is correct, it had no merit and was an issue whipped up into a frenzy by the tech press and various government entities looking for a excuse to bring down Apple.

    The 10.2.1 iOS release notes DO mention the throttling aka power management .... but no-one reads release notes,.

    "iOS 10.2.1

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.

    It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone."

    Exactly. Apple was sued for providing an alternative to the phone shutting off unexpectedly. And the shut off itself was a safety feature that was present on every smartphone being sold due to the limitations of the battery tech. So anyone who claimed that their phone was being throttled regularly due to the new OS feature should have been experiencing regular shut downs of their iPhone prior to that point. Which then brings up this question: why would throttling make you think the phone needed to be replaced if the shut downs did not? The frequency would have been the same.
    edited January 6 stompywatto_cobramacxpressjony0
  • Reply 6 of 19
    loopless said:  He is correct, it had no merit and was an issue whipped up into a frenzy by the tech press and various government entities looking for a excuse to bring down Apple.


    You’ve sure got a lot of woo woo going on…

    You geniuses must be assuming Apple’s entire lawyer team are complete doofus idiots who never had a clue about tech in their entire lives.

    Tell me. Oh great wondrous sages, if this was such a simple and easily won argument, why on Earth do you think Apple settled?  Do you think they wanted to give away $500 million?  Or perhaps maybe, just maybe, there’s a lot more intricacy and underhandedness to the case on Apple’s part than you realize.

    Breaking news: companies only settle for hundreds of millions of dollars when they believe there’s a very strong chance they’re not going to win in court.  

    It’s funny how armchair lawyers on the Internet always think they are sooooo much smarter than real lawyers who are actually involved with cases for several years.  ߤ㰟肰
    edited January 6 muthuk_vanalingambeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 7 of 19


    Breaking news: companies only settle for hundreds of millions of dollars when they believe there’s a very strong chance they’re not going to win in court.  

    It’s funny how armchair lawyers on the Internet always think they are sooooo much smarter than real lawyers who are actually involved with cases for several years.  ߤ㰟肰

    Nice armchair lawyering.   There was also public perception.  Apple could have done a much better job of explaining, and it’s possible they chose not to say any kind of version of “we’re slowing doen your performance a significant/noticeable amount of the time because technical reasons”.   They could have WON in court and it would have cost them as much or more in direct and intangible costs.  No legal merits required. 
    watto_cobradewmejony0
  • Reply 8 of 19
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 217member
    Did the throttling apply only when in situations where the peak battery was diminished (perhaps due to age or temperature)?  Or did the throttling apply even in situations where there was a new battery and the temp was reasonable?

    If they are throttling for all batteries, then they have reduced peak performance.  This performance downgrade might be seen as an attempt to get people to upgrade to a newer phone.

    If the throttling only occurred in situations where the phone was sure the battery could not keep up, the throttling seems much more reasonable.

    It boils down to whether the throttling applied only to phones in situations where the phone would crash, or if it also applied to all phones, including those that had a good enough battery to keep up with peak performance.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 19
    loopless said:
    It wasn’t limited to aging batteries. The voltage supply problems could happen with brand new batteries that were being used at charge levels below 20% or used in cold temperatures. That’s just the way that lithium ion technology works when it’s at the smartphone size level.

    This was a lawsuit that never really had any merit. 
    He is correct, it had no merit and was an issue whipped up into a frenzy by the tech press and various government entities looking for a excuse to bring down Apple.

    The 10.2.1 iOS release notes DO mention the throttling aka power management .... but no-one reads release notes,.

    "iOS 10.2.1

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.

    It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone."



    All Apple had to do was use a notification to the user that their phone was in limp mode until the battery was recharged or replaced. Maybe you are OK with Apple dicking you as a customer but apparently not everyone is.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 19
    Settling <> found guilty. 
    Settlements sometime saintly are cheaper than seeing it through and winning eventually. 

    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 11 of 19
    Isn't it a bit 20th century to be sending out checks? Get with the times USA!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 19
    Looking forward to receiving my check. 
  • Reply 13 of 19
    loopless said:
    It wasn’t limited to aging batteries. The voltage supply problems could happen with brand new batteries that were being used at charge levels below 20% or used in cold temperatures. That’s just the way that lithium ion technology works when it’s at the smartphone size level.

    This was a lawsuit that never really had any merit. 
    He is correct, it had no merit and was an issue whipped up into a frenzy by the tech press and various government entities looking for a excuse to bring down Apple.

    The 10.2.1 iOS release notes DO mention the throttling aka power management .... but no-one reads release notes,.

    "iOS 10.2.1

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.

    It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone."



    Do you have a screenshot of this? Not that I don’t believe you, but because I tried to find if the info was included in the release notes back when this happened & couldn’t find anything. I don’t think Apple was doing this to make people upgrade their phones. 
  • Reply 14 of 19
    In relation to the comment about armchair lawyers and real ones, often lawyers who practice do not get the best deal for their client, often believing, sometimes erroneously, that doing a deal to get something is better than actually doing the job they are employed to do.  I work in law and see it all the time, on occasion to my own detriment.
  • Reply 15 of 19
    jimh2jimh2 Posts: 642member
    Settling <> found guilty. 
    Settlements sometime saintly are cheaper than seeing it through and winning eventually. 

    It is past time for companies to start litigating these lawsuits in court. Until a stand is taken they will continue whether they lack merit or not. It will take some losses, but once the wins are rolling in the firms “volunteering” their services will dry up and so will the lawsuits. 

    The “settlement solution” has created a network of lawyers whose expertise is extracting settlements. I doubt most are prepared to take it to court. The same is true for the auto wreck lawyers who know the insurance companies will settle. I’d like to see a move to the British legal system where the plaintiff pays all legal bills for both parties if they lose. This too would clamp down on frivolous suits. 
    wonkothesane
  • Reply 16 of 19
    XedXed Posts: 2,704member
    jimh2 said:
    Settling <> found guilty. 
    Settlements sometime saintly are cheaper than seeing it through and winning eventually. 

    It is past time for companies to start litigating these lawsuits in court. Until a stand is taken they will continue whether they lack merit or not. It will take some losses, but once the wins are rolling in the firms “volunteering” their services will dry up and so will the lawsuits. 

    The “settlement solution” has created a network of lawyers whose expertise is extracting settlements. I doubt most are prepared to take it to court. The same is true for the auto wreck lawyers who know the insurance companies will settle. I’d like to see a move to the British legal system where the plaintiff pays all legal bills for both parties if they lose. This too would clamp down on frivolous suits. 

  • Reply 17 of 19
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,539member
    Woo hoo. Now all of these iPhone owners can snatch an Apple Vision Pro for only $3406.83. 
  • Reply 18 of 19
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,871member
    Isn't it a bit 20th century to be sending out checks? Get with the times USA!
    They should have sent Apple Gift Cards...Apple most likely would have made money off that. 
  • Reply 19 of 19
    It was a real surprise to see that show up in my bank account early Saturday morning. I had totally forgotten about it and wondered why I got money from Apple. 

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