Jonathan Ive's design direction

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 46
    As far as I am concerned, I don't think it will be colors as much as metalic. Look at the TiBook, the iPod, and the iBook. Yeah, before you say it, the iBook is all plastic. However when you look at it, it is a clean, slick looking machine that looks almost metallic. I think that Apple could go along these lines and make something with a metallic look and feel. Could you imagine a metallic blue, metallic red, and a metallic white?? Oh yes!! The Sapphire (bad speller, yes I know), Ruby, and Diamond iMacs!! Now you could have a FIELD DAY with marketing on those kind of names!!!
  • Reply 22 of 46
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    [quote]Originally posted by Mike Eggleston:

    <strong>Could you imagine a metallic blue, metallic red, and a metallic white?? Oh yes!! The Sapphire (bad speller, yes I know), Ruby, and Diamond iMacs!!</strong><hr></blockquote>



    What did I just get finished saying above? Man, it's like I'm not even here.



  • Reply 23 of 46
    Pscates. We get the picture already. It is possible for us to disagree with you, however.



    I personally wouldn't be surprised either way. Whether Apple kept/adapted colors, new or old, or abandoned colors; whether they went with a one-color design or multiple colors/shades/hues/tints/reflectivenesses/etc/etc. I look at it this way:



    Reasons to keep the colors:

    - Hallmark of iMac line

    - Coined the popular culture meaning of an iMac

    - Has come to represent Apple's new era, and especially Jobs/Ives design era, as well as the iMac

    - Gives consumers choice--consumers like that

    - Lets people coordinate computers with rooms, furniture, favorite colors, other hardware, whatever (I know a lot of dummies picked iMacs solely because they looked so cool, and you gotta admit a bright orange translucent computer looks much cooler than a mostly opaque white computer).

    - Still has room for change (list all of the colors Apple's changed the iMac lineup with through the 3 years it's been around)

    - Differentiates the iMac so it isn't all just like the rest of Apple's line (boring)

    - White, or gray, is just too close to beige and all of the other colors PCs are using today

    - Matches Aqua!



    Reasons not to have iColors:

    - Has been copied, and copied, and copied

    - Some fashion critics in the AppleInsider community think it is "passé"

    - Doesn't really match the rest of the Apple line

    - Non-bright colors is more subdued and sophisticated according to pro users like us (who should probably be buying the subdued and sophisticated Power Macs but oh well)

    - Retailers didn't warm up to the idea of stocking a bunch of different iMac colors at first



    IMHO it really could go either way--it might not be Ive's decision to make. What you or I want is, quite frankly, irrelevant to what Apple shall decide to do.
  • Reply 24 of 46
    If diamond is a color choice. I can almost gurantee this marketing phrase:



    "Diamond in the rough."
  • Reply 25 of 46
    [quote]Originally posted by Jonathan:

    <strong>I think that, now that the color thing has caught on with the rest of the world, it's not cool enough for Apple anymore.



    Seriously.</strong><hr></blockquote>

    and whatever it is apple has up their sleeves will be in the worlds hands a month or so after apple and then likewise will die out a year or so after. its the common trend
  • Reply 26 of 46
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    [quote]Originally posted by bradbower:

    <strong>Pscates. We get the picture already. It is possible for us to disagree with you, however. </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Actually, it's not, Bradley. Check the bylaws, down toward the bottom of page 23. Have your attorneys contact mine if there are any questions.
  • Reply 27 of 46
    Here are a couple of my favorite quotes related to product design and style. I use them here because I think they identify the principles that govern modern design and expalin style:



    Walter Crane:

    from the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society Catologue of the Second Exhibition. London, 1889, p.7.



    [quote]'plain materials and surfaces are infinitely preferable to inorganic or inappropriate ornament' <hr></blockquote>





    Dieter Ramms: (former Product Designer for Phillips Electronics)



    [quote]

    'Omit the unimportant, extenuate the positive'.

    <hr></blockquote>



    John. A. Walker

    from Design History and the History of Design. Pg.156 (Pluto Press 1989)



    [quote]Style is not a concept which can be sensibly applied to a single artifact: it is only valid in respect to artifacts considered as members of groups. To identify an object as belonging to a particular style necessarily implies the existance of other objects with features in common. And the specific character of one style is almost clearly seen when it is contrasted with others. <hr></blockquote>



    [ 12-13-2001: Message edited by: userone ]



    [ 12-13-2001: Message edited by: userone ]</p>
  • Reply 28 of 46
    satchmosatchmo Posts: 2,699member
    Psychology plays a role in the colour scheme of the new iMac.



    Apple's main focus these days are aimed at providing digital lifestyle solutions.



    A new iMac with bright colours may convey a sense of fun but also toy like image that isn't powerful or productive.

    Subdued colour schemes do the opposite and create a sense of seriousness, power and professionalism.



    The difficulty is finding that fine balance between not alienating consumers (kids, teens) by creating something too slick and not doing something as garish as the Dalmation look that would turn off parents and adults.
  • Reply 29 of 46
    They can always introduce variety later on like they did with the original iMac.



    I believe this is what might happen.



    But i agree we will see some white, grey, silver stuff until then. I think the idea is to let the Aqua interface on the screen steal the show.
  • Reply 30 of 46
    amorphamorph Posts: 7,112member
    [quote]Originally posted by pscates:

    <strong>



    What did I just get finished saying above? Man, it's like I'm not even here.



    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Who are you again?
  • Reply 31 of 46
    How about a white/transparent iMac, but with different color glowing apple (ala the (T)iBooks) on the back? The different colors would be indicative of the level of iMac it is. How hard would it be to switch the color of the apple out? I'm not sure how those form-factors would work. If there is three levels of iMac, then have the low-end be Bondi (a nostalgic factor), then the next ruby, then grape, or something like that. Have the latter two colors correspond with the best selling colors ever. Just a thought.

    -CT
  • Reply 32 of 46
    robbyrobby Posts: 109member
    how about something see through like the 17" studio display.
  • Reply 33 of 46
    I agree with the minimal design direction Apple is taking. I think it will be difficult for any designer with a strong minimal aesthetic to do "colors" again.



    For the first time the entire Apple line is really looking beautiful. The design is more logical and things are converging in concept.



    The Quicksilver colors lend themselves very well to an "imac" an even an "ipod", the question is how do you keep a unified look yet still have a distinct look for each product...



    The white on white ibook is industrial design at it's most beautiful. A white on white tower would be shockingly beautiful I think.



    But rather than colors I'm thinking an ibook in:



    White on white, grey on grey, charcoal (near black) on near black. Those three colors would look really sleek and make it personally difficult to choose. As it is, I can't decide which is more beautiful, the Titanium powerbook or the white ibook. Give me a tonal tower and I might go mad....
  • Reply 34 of 46
    if they ditch colors they'll have to replace the indigo iMac "computer" button in osx's finder toolbar. I never liked those icons anyway.
  • Reply 35 of 46
    emaneman Posts: 7,204member
    [quote]Originally posted by Ventral:

    <strong>if they ditch colors they'll have to replace the indigo iMac "computer" button in osx's finder toolbar. I never liked those icons anyway.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Even if they don't ditch colors they'll have to update that button since the LCD iMacs will look different.
  • Reply 36 of 46
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    I have the solution for everyone... Hypercolor iMacs...remember those? Ah...the early 90s.



    Seriously, I think colored iMacs might still be in. Mac OS X is colorful. The new paper bags at the Apple Stores have red Apple logos. The iMac was available in 6 colors at its peak, the iBook was only ever available in 3 colors at any one time.



    On the other hand, having only one ore two "shades" may be a lot better in the long run, making the customer's choices much less difficult.
  • Reply 37 of 46
    emaneman Posts: 7,204member
    [quote]Originally posted by Eugene:

    Seriously, I think colored iMacs might still be in. Mac OS X is colorful. The new paper bags at the Apple Stores have red Apple logos<hr></blockquote>



    I may be wrong, but I think the only reason why the bags have a red Apple logo is for the holidays.



    [ 12-17-2001: Message edited by: EmAn ]</p>
  • Reply 38 of 46
    Well as far as the colourful new OS, I find that the direction seems to be towards a colourful experience ONSCREEN. As much as I hate to see it, the logical direction of the consumer line (i-products) tends to be in the direction of the snow/ice white colours of the new ibook (which I've ordered myself) and the snowwhite imac.



    Will we see a graphite ibook? Or even an INDIGO!?! I digress.



    Personally, I love the icebook. I just spent CAN$3250 on the 600 combo. HOWEVER, The design philosophy behind this "sterilization" or "hospitalization" of the i-line really scares me a little. While apple seems to be focussing on their revolutionary new XP kicking OS which looks beautifully accentuated against a sleek, white computer...



    ..will consumers dig a computer that doesn't have the same 'flair' inherant in the hardware itself?



    Definetly an innovative way to go ahead with the digital hub strategy, the more i think about it, the more it makes sense.





    Maybe I'm just feeling sad because I never owned a colourful imac/book



    MY TWO PENNIES



    --Pres
  • Reply 39 of 46
    smirclesmircle Posts: 1,035member
    Originally posted by satchmo:

    [quote]A new iMac with bright colours may convey a sense of fun but also toy like image that isn't powerful or productive.

    Subdued colour schemes do the opposite and create a sense of seriousness, power and professionalism.<hr></blockquote>



    I guess this has to be the reason wintel computers by and large never deviated from beige.
  • Reply 40 of 46
    [quote]Originally posted by Smircle:

    <strong>Originally posted by satchmo:

    I guess this has to be the reason wintel computers by and large never deviated from beige.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Actually, there were a number of attemps at the use of color by the wintel camp, they just never became popular.
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