Dual core GPU's? Will it happen?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
When do you think we will begin to see use of dual core GPU's in consumer computers (i.e. iMac, and notebook lines)?



Is there a need for this or do GPU's work differently than regular cpu's because of current software?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    the next-gen nvidia cards I read have two cores.



    They also use GDDR4 ram. They are going to be an outrageous jump in performance, and they are supposed to offer full directx 10 support.



    I read this awhile ago though, so I could be wrong.
  • Reply 2 of 20
    programmerprogrammer Posts: 3,453member
    This is a bit of a non sequitur -- current GPUs have 4-16 vertex engines and 12-24 pixel engines, each of which can be considered a "core" in the sense that it is executing its own (shader) program. The SLI nVidia cards are two of these chips running in parallel and dividing the workload between them. GPUs are way ahead of CPUs because they are focus on a specific problem (graphics), and one that happens to be embarrassingly parallel.
  • Reply 3 of 20
    Quote:

    Originally posted by tensdanny38

    the next-gen nvidia cards I read have two cores.



    They also use GDDR4 ram. They are going to be an outrageous jump in performance, and they are supposed to offer full directx 10 support.



    I read this awhile ago though, so I could be wrong.




    asus already has them out for retail purchase. newegg is selling them.
  • Reply 4 of 20
    Quote:

    Originally posted by giddyup69

    asus already has them out for retail purchase. newegg is selling them.



    no no, I meant the geforce 8 series cards. They are a totally new product coming out in like 6 months.
  • Reply 5 of 20
    banchobancho Posts: 1,517member
    Didn't 3dfx have some Voodoo cards with more than one GPU on them before they got bought out?



    Here's a link that shows 3dfx had versions of the Voodoo 5 with 2 and even 4 cores on them. Pretty cool stuff. Imagine dual core versions of some current GPUs



    http://video-cards.carte3d.com/3dfx.php



    Here's a more current one from Nvidia:



    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...2E16814122232R
  • Reply 7 of 20
    xoolxool Posts: 2,460member
    I would expect that dual core GPUs are only a matter of time. We've seen dual card systems but that's pretty wasteful. GPUs will probably skip the dual-processor stuff and go straight to dual core if they can.
  • Reply 8 of 20
    wmfwmf Posts: 1,164member
    Dual-core CPUs exist because massive CPU cores, even though they're better, cost too much to design. Designing massive GPU cores doesn't seem to be a problem, so I suspect ATI and nVidia will continue on that course.
  • Reply 9 of 20
    programmerprogrammer Posts: 3,453member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Xool

    I would expect that dual core GPUs are only a matter of time. We've seen dual card systems but that's pretty wasteful. GPUs will probably skip the dual-processor stuff and go straight to dual core if they can.



    Can't you read? GPUs are already 24 or more cores, so saying they will go "dual core" is just clueless.



  • Reply 10 of 20
    xoolxool Posts: 2,460member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Programmer

    Can't you read? GPUs are already 24 or more cores, so saying they will go "dual core" is just clueless.







    While technically correct, I don't believe that's the intention of the thread. I think the discussion revolves around taking multiple GPU systems and glomming them together. Current CPUs (and GPUs) are made of a number of components and we're not talking about them individually but treating them as a single unit.
  • Reply 11 of 20
    rickagrickag Posts: 1,626member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Xool

    While technically correct, I don't believe that's the intention of the thread. I think the discussion revolves around taking multiple GPU systems and glomming them together. Current CPUs (and GPUs) are made of a number of components and we're not talking about them individually but treating them as a single unit.



    This may be a dumb statement, but I never claimed to be an expert.

    As Programmer said the current GPU's have 24 or more cores. What would be the point of glomming together 2 GPU's and having to add the necessary components to get them to talk together, kind of like a dual core CPU. Why wouldn't the Graphics GPU designers just double the existing cores to 48 or more cores.
  • Reply 12 of 20
    mattyjmattyj Posts: 898member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by rickag

    This may be a dumb statement, but I never claimed to be an expert.

    As Programmer said the current GPU's have 24 or more cores. What would be the point of glomming together 2 GPU's and having to add the necessary components to get them to talk together, kind of like a dual core CPU. Why wouldn't the Graphics GPU designers just double the existing cores to 48 or more cores.




    They are and they have done - look at the Radeon X1900 XT, faster than a 7800/7900 (not sure about 7900 actually) because it has 48 cores as opposed to the nVidias 24.



    There is more to a GPU than these cores, which is why a Dual GPU option if properly optimised by game hardware would yield some great results (as long as the card in question has double the memory a single GPU usually has).
  • Reply 13 of 20
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mattyj

    They are and they have done - look at the Radeon X1900 XT, faster than a 7800/7900 (not sure about 7900 actually) because it has 48 cores as opposed to the nVidias 24.



    There is more to a GPU than these cores, which is why a Dual GPU option if properly optimised by game hardware would yield some great results (as long as the card in question has double the memory a single GPU usually has).




    Common Misconception. The X1900XTX only has 16 Pixel Pipelines (The different "cores" you guys are talking about) but 48 shader units. It looks like they won't be going dual-core per-se, but will have more and more cards in an SLI/CrossFire array. We're already up to four 7900GTXs. BTW, it's a see-saw in terms of the 7900GTX vs. the X1900XTX. No one has any definete data and when you go to different sites, they're all over the place.
  • Reply 14 of 20
    mattyjmattyj Posts: 898member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by theapplegenius

    Common Misconception. The X1900XTX only has 16 Pixel Pipelines (The different "cores" you guys are talking about) but 48 shader units. It looks like they won't be going dual-core per-se, but will have more and more cards in an SLI/CrossFire array. We're already up to four 7900GTXs. BTW, it's a see-saw in terms of the 7900GTX vs. the X1900XTX. No one has any definete data and when you go to different sites, they're all over the place.



    That is true. Isn't this also true of the nVidia cards (at least the 7800) so I've heard - 16 pipelines and 24 shader units. I've heard these been dubbed "half cores" or something like that. However for the sake of this argument I think such inaccuracies won't make much difference. As I said, there is more to a GPU than shader pipelines.



    Dual GPU cards would be nice because not everyone wants to pay for a decent SLI board, which are more costly that normal single slot boards.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    mmmpiemmmpie Posts: 628member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Xool

    While technically correct, I don't believe that's the intention of the thread. I think the discussion revolves around taking multiple GPU systems and glomming them together. Current CPUs (and GPUs) are made of a number of components and we're not talking about them individually but treating them as a single unit.



    GPUs will never go dual core. Modern GPUs are already designed in a very modular manner. If a process can provide double the space for a chip they will design a chip with double the resources. On top of that, a GPU resource ( shader, pixel pipeline ) is much smaller than a whole core, so increases in the number of resources can happen much faster as the amount of space required for one extra isnt double ( ie: GPUs can take advantage of small process improvements to improve performance ).



    What will continue to happen more and more is dual/quad card and chip designs. Why? Because at the threshold for economic chip production it is possible to go beyond that performance limit in a viable manner. ie: For a chip like the x1800 which is about as big a chip as can be made, it isnt possible to increase the chip size and maintain acceptable yeilds. But any two working x1800s can be selected and ganged together, getting well beyond the capabilities of the chip manufacturers limits.
  • Reply 16 of 20
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    I thought I say an article a few months back that Nvidia was looking into multi-cored designs for future GPU's? Maybe I was mistaken. \
  • Reply 17 of 20
    No, they probably will. When we hit 45nm.
  • Reply 18 of 20
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    SLI for notebooks is here. I am assuming this is what the poster means by a "dual core gpu" notebook

    http://www.slizone.com/object/slizone_notebooks.html



    a "dual core GPU" PC (non-notebook) is already out, i think asus has a dual core GPU card that you can SLI (so as to have four cores)
  • Reply 19 of 20
    xoolxool Posts: 2,460member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by sunilraman

    SLI for notebooks is here. I am assuming this is what the poster means by a "dual core gpu" notebook

    http://www.slizone.com/object/slizone_notebooks.html



    a "dual core GPU" PC (non-notebook) is already out, i think asus has a dual core GPU card that you can SLI (so as to have four cores)




    Yes, I'm glad someone gets what I (and the thread poster) are talking about! Technically state-of-the-art GPUs are already multi-core designs but it shouldn't be expected that two or more could be used to drive a single display. And like current CPUs, separate multi-processor systems will eventually be placed on the same silicon, reducing costs and sharing other components.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    To answer more clearly the original poster's question, Apple will pretty much NEVER EVER EVER use multicore GPUS. if ever, only very specialised apple solution providers will offer such things.



    edit: I guess never say never, but by NEVER I guess I mean the eternity in computer terms that is the span of 2 years.
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