10 Things I hate about OS X

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  • Reply 41 of 77
    dmwogandmwogan Posts: 36member
    The thing that drives me nuts is not being able to click a letter on the keyboard instead of mousing over to the button in a dialogue box. For example, in Safari, when it asks if you want to save password, it'd be nice to just type 'N' for not now or never..whatever. It works in MS Office for mac, but nowhere else really. Maybe firefox. It'd be nice if the actual OS would have this functionality.



    Also, the dock is pretty crappy if you ask me. I prefer the old method of have the menu in the upper right hand corner to switch between apps.



    While we're on it, the apple menu. I miss the old apple menu from System 7 / OS 9 where it actually had functionality. Thats about all I can think of right now.
  • Reply 42 of 77
    chuckerchucker Posts: 5,089member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by dmwogan

    The thing that drives me nuts is not being able to click a letter on the keyboard instead of mousing over to the button in a dialogue box. For example, in Safari, when it asks if you want to save password, it'd be nice to just type 'N' for not now or never..whatever. It works in MS Office for mac, but nowhere else really. Maybe firefox. It'd be nice if the actual OS would have this functionality.



    Many alerts have keyboard shortcuts. Often, a "Don't ?" action is associated with Cmd-D, and a "Cancel" one with Esc. You should try those.



    There's also always keyword navigation so you can select with tab and trigger with space.
  • Reply 43 of 77
    irelandireland Posts: 17,794member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by dmwogan

    Also, the dock is pretty crappy if you ask me.



    The dock is the greatest thing since that English guy invented sliced bread if you ask me. (the Earl of sandwich by the way)
  • Reply 44 of 77
    If you want the old menu back I'd advise getting classicmenu (http://www.sigsoftware.com/classicmenu/). It works like the old menu and I'd say has more functionality. You can also switch back to the regular menu by holding option down. The app also includes the classic menu icon
  • Reply 45 of 77
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ipodandimac

    OS X is by no means perfect, but I can think of over 100,000 reasons I hate Windows and they all fall under one category.



    100,000 Reasons: Viruses
  • Reply 46 of 77
    blascockblascock Posts: 153member
    Why do people hate the dock so much?

    And without a dock how would you navigate? Im new to macs so I never had the classic OS experience. If it was so good why didnt they keep it?
  • Reply 47 of 77
    dmwogandmwogan Posts: 36member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Chucker

    Many alerts have keyboard shortcuts. Often, a "Don't ?" action is associated with Cmd-D, and a "Cancel" one with Esc. You should try those.



    There's also always keyword navigation so you can select with tab and trigger with space.




    nice. I'll try those. I knew about the ESC, but not about apple-D etc...
  • Reply 48 of 77
    dmwogandmwogan Posts: 36member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Ireland

    The dock is the greatest thing since that English guy invented sliced bread if you ask me. (the Earl of sandwich by the way)



    Yeah, I just don't find much use for the dock. I usually open stuff with either spotlight or quicksilver. I always found it easier to switch apps with the application switcher menu back in the day.
  • Reply 49 of 77
    1337_5l4xx0r1337_5l4xx0r Posts: 1,558member
    I always found it easier to switch apps with Command Tab, and switch through windows with Command-`, or use Exposé for either.



    Neruda: I have no idea what your talking about. I use 3+Ghz P4-based XP boxes at school, and for simple file navigation/multithreading/task switching, they crawl as compared to this 867mhz G4 powerbook from 4 years ago. In fairness to MS, XP is like 5 years old, but still, very weak.
  • Reply 50 of 77
    gene cleangene clean Posts: 3,481member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R

    I use 3+Ghz P4-based XP boxes at school, and for simple file navigation/multithreading/task switching, they crawl as compared to this 867mhz G4 powerbook from 4 years ago.



  • Reply 51 of 77
    turnwriteturnwrite Posts: 372member
    Personally, I don't love or hate the Dock.



    What I miss about OS 9 is just the multiple ways of doing things.



    Like, to launch an app you had the Apple Menu OR desktop icons OR the Launcher OR popup folders with "button" icons.



    To switch between apps you had the little corner menu OR you could tear it off and make a little Draggy Switcher Thing which you could change the size and orientation of.



    In OS 9, you could customize your little heart out.



    Remember the Appearance Control Panel that actually let you change the appearance of your computer (OS X's sucks.)



    In OS 9, you could do things YOUR way. It seems like in OS X, there is only ONE way to do everything, and lots of the customization has been taken away.
  • Reply 52 of 77
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,608member
    I really hate Mac keyboard navigation. It's important to me because much of what I do shouldn't require the mouse. It makes me sick to say it, but Windows does a better job in this regards. The pathetic keyboard access that is provided os clunky and slow. The fact that even Apple can't standardize keyboard commands across applications is also disappointing. The worst example for keyboard integration is Excel-- hundreds of keyboard commands to remember (different from Windows version), and the only way to jog your memory on them is through Help!



    I also dislike the "simplified" (read dumbed-down) user interface masquerading as an "easy to use" interface. It's a shame that you can't have an "expert" mode, or at least make applications remember you like the verbose Save dialogue box. I can handle a little extra screen clutter if related options are grouped together.



    The need for dragging things to the trash can also drives me nuts...



    As for the Dock... I don't understand the problems. Make the icons small and you have a fairly uncluttered place to put them without the pit-falls of them being on the desktop.
  • Reply 53 of 77
    Quote:

    Originally posted by dmwogan

    Yeah, I just don't find much use for the dock. I usually open stuff with either spotlight or quicksilver. I always found it easier to switch apps with the application switcher menu back in the day.



    Does anyone know of a way to turn off the Dock? It would be great to create a little more real estate on the desktop. I would love an always-available Applications menu....perhaps positioned right next to the Apple menu.
  • Reply 54 of 77
    I find the keyboard shortcut for navigating through tabs in Safari a pain. I have to contort my fingers to press Command-Shift-right or left arrows. Is there another way?



    Speaking of keyboard navigation... I find it unintuitive to navigate to and open files, folders, and apps in the Finder. Why won't the Return key open something? Instead, you have to press Command-Down Arrow key. Am I missing something?
  • Reply 55 of 77
    I can't believe no one has mentioned the horrible network performance! I can remember in 1988, on System 6.0.5, I could go to my Chooser and log onto a server faster than I can now. Bear in mind, I'm talking LocalTalk! I think it had a max throughput of 115Kbps! What gives? Apple needs to relegate SAMBA to Windows interoperability only and bring back the Chooser and Appletalk. Selecting a server is a joke. I hate that WindowsXP/2000 networks so much faster/better than MacOSX!



  • Reply 56 of 77
    rolandgrolandg Posts: 632member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R

    I always found it easier to switch apps with Command Tab, and switch through windows with Command-`.



    This is the one thing I just can't find out how to do - and Command (which is the Apple key, right?) -` still doesn't work for me - at least in Safari. Is ` the apostrophe character or the accent grave one?



    Also, is there a keyboard short cut to refresh a folder's contents (equivalent to the F5-key in Windows)?



    Quote:

    Neruda: I have no idea what your talking about. I use 3+Ghz P4-based XP boxes at school, and for simple file navigation/multithreading/task switching, they crawl as compared to this 867mhz G4 powerbook from 4 years ago. In fairness to MS, XP is like 5 years old, but still, very weak.



    I just had to work on an 1800+ Athlon XP system running Windows XP and it was very slow which IMO is due to an active virus monitor.



    One other thing I'd like to see in OS X is a more intuitive way of starting applications. On a fresh OS X install the user has to open the applications folder either by first opening the harddrive or by choosing it from the Finder's "go to" menu. There needs to be a more accessible way besides dragging it into the dock since opening the menu by holding down the mouse button takes very long as it seems to reread the contents every time.
  • Reply 57 of 77
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,841member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by cheezr33t

    I can't believe no one has mentioned the horrible network performance! I can remember in 1988, on System 6.0.5, I could go to my Chooser and log onto a server faster than I can now. Bear in mind, I'm talking LocalTalk! I think it had a max throughput of 115Kbps! What gives?







    The Chooser was awful. Why have one (highly unstable) application to choose printers and servers? How are printers and servers related?



    In my experience, network performance of OS X >> network performance of OS 9.



    It is crazy to suggest OS X has poor networking performance compared to OS 9. The networking stack of OS 9 was poor in many respects, whereas OS X's core is BSD UNIX, famous for the quality of its networking implementation.



    Quote:

    Originally posted by cheezr33t

    Apple needs to relegate SAMBA to Windows interoperability only and bring back the Chooser and Appletalk. Selecting a server is a joke. I hate that WindowsXP/2000 networks so much faster/better than MacOSX!







    SAMBA is only for networking with Windows. You can use AFP (Apple File Protocol; "personal file sharing" tick box in sharing pane of system preferences) for sharing between Apple machines.



    And, OS X does have AppleTalk, but you don't need to activate it to use AFP.



    edit: What is bad is the Finder's threading, which can make the networking look bad. If the Finder is waiting for the network, it locks up the GUI and you can't do anything.
  • Reply 58 of 77
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,841member
    double post
  • Reply 59 of 77
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member
    Networking performance, or lack thereof, is definitely the weakest part of the Mac experience and has been for as long as I can remember (System 7.0.1). What kind of modern computer freezes when your small child unplugs the network cord or turns off power to the router? If BSD UNIX is so good at networking why do 4 year old Windows PCs transfer files so much faster than dual processor G5s?



    The Finder is slow and still prone to lock ups. I could excuse it when the ancient classic MacOS was trying to do cooperative multitasking, but this is BSD running on a multiprocessor machine. How many mainframes ever locked up when a user app crashed?



    I really hate that Spotlight can't find a file when I know one of the words in the filename, but not the first.



    I miss popup folders because they were better than folders in the Dock.



    After discovering Spark I no longer miss the utilities that allowed me to customize the Apple menu and/or assign keyboard shortcuts to those items. Hitting [control] M to launch or activate Mail is so intuitive and once you've got more than 6 apps open [command] tab is way too slow to switch from one app to another.
  • Reply 60 of 77
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mr. H





    The Chooser was awful. Why have one (highly unstable) application to choose printers and servers? How are printers and servers related?



    In my experience, network performance of OS X >> network performance of OS 9.



    It is crazy to suggest OS X has poor networking performance compared to OS 9. The networking stack of OS 9 was poor in many respects, whereas OS X's core is BSD UNIX, famous for the quality of its networking implementation.







    SAMBA is only for networking with Windows. You can use AFP (Apple File Protocol; "personal file sharing" tick box in sharing pane of system preferences) for sharing between Apple machines.



    And, OS X does have AppleTalk, but you don't need to activate it to use AFP.



    edit: What is bad is the Finder's threading, which can make the networking look bad. If the Finder is waiting for the network, it locks up the GUI and you can't do anything.




    perhaps i should clarify, i was trying to be brief...



    1. the chooser was not awful (font/da mover was awful). i worked at uswest when we hit appletalk's zone limit and 65,000 user limit and i could still navigate to a server in a fraction of the time it takes me now. bear in mind, i was using quadras and various '030 machines on 10baseT back then. with the current os you might as well smoke a cigarette while you wait for the server list to propagate over 1000baseT. i don't know if the chooser cached ZIP info or what, but macosx is 100 times slower when navigating to the server you want. it also takes much longer to present the user login/password screen. chooser was instantaneous.



    2. macosx is faster copying files. true.



    3. yes macosx uses bsd unix. and if the finder makes it a 100 times slower, what good is it? security and performance should not be mutually exclusive qualities.



    4. printer and servers are related. they are both network resources.



    perhaps my original post should have faulted the poor performance of the finder's implementation of the network browser and not macosx bsd networking?
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