nicoteo

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nicoteo
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  • Apple employees threaten to quit as company takes hard line stance on remote work

    So, I have lots of work experience with this stuff. They are not required to turn over medical records. Apple doesn't need their records or diagnosis unless the employee chooses to share it. What employees DO need to do is have their doctor fill out paperwork outlining what accommodations are needed based on the individual job description which HR would provide for this purpose. The employer DOESN'T need to agree to them for every job. For example, if someone is hired specifically to drive a fork-lift and their accommodations prevent them from reasonably being able to do the duties of the job (i.e. they cannot operate machinery for more than 15 minutes at a time or something), the employer can say no, sorry, you can no longer do the job you were hired for. At that point the employer will engage in a process to figure out another suitable position for the employee so that the accommodations can be followed. Pay may or may not be the same.  If none, then the employee is out of luck and often at that point should be considering the type of work they are trying to do. Perhaps disability or another type of job is better with the change in abilities.

     I went through this myself and chose to start my own business instead of trying to make my employer work around my ever-increasing needs. I am ALL for employee rights...but nobody is entitled to keep a job they can no longer reasonably do without undue hardship on the company they are working for and its needs. For clarity I'm focusing most on the employee with ADA accommodations that they think will be later denied). Most employers will allow accommodations that are temporary in nature (during an accident recovery for example). If the accommodation is permanent, they're going to have to prove it as well as prove they can still complete the job they were hired for. Working from home is a very tricky one because there is so much liability. For example, if you're working using your dining room chair and your back becomes hurt, is it worker's comp? Is it your own personal injury? Most companies want to avoid this kind of stuff if possible because what happens is so many people try to take advantage. At the same time, I expect Apple to be open-minded and at the forefront of a healthier work/life balance for employees. If the employees can reasonably work from home and complete their jobs, Apple could easily work with their legal department to facilitate the process. It really all comes down to what jobs these people are doing and if Apple has reasonably tried to accommodate needs.
    riverkorandominternetpersonIreneWdewmeforegoneconclusionred oaknadrielJWSCdysamoriaspock1234
  • Leaked images of revamped iPad Pro and iPad mini show few changes

    melgross said:
    flydog said:
    melgross said:
    What I’ve wanted is for Apple to put the FaceTime sensors and front cameras on a long side. It’s ridiculous that they have it in the portrait position. Who really uses an iPad that way most of the time? This is a horizontal device. FaceTime isn’t as useful because on the side, it doesn’t always work, because you hold it by the sides.
    Everybody who is not watching a video.  It's not a "horizontal" device.  It was designed to be used primarily in portrait mode since that is optimum for consuming most content.  
    A few of you guys are out of sync. Maybe a small handful out if every hundred use it vertically. I’ve been to conferences where hundreds of people are using ipads, and everyone is horizontal. Maybe you guys are using. It for some odd games, but the pro are serious tools, and we don’t buy them to just watch video.
    I'm a medical professional (and an artist on the side) who also goes to lots of conferences and I can count on one hand the people out of hundreds who I've seen using it horizontally. Also out and about in the Bay Area / San Francisco and in Portland, Oregon (live in both cities), I pretty much exclusively see iPads being used in portrait mode. I do serious work using serious tools as well, and using it in Portrait has no bearing on how serious a tool it is or how serious one's work is. What a ridiculous comment to make. It also has nothing to do with "games". I don't even play games on either of them. They are are integral part of my medical work and my research as well as my art and photography. As I mentioned in another comment, when I'm creating art, I'll use whatever orientation I need at the time....I agree with you that of course the Smart Cover is designed for horizontal use as well as the keyboard covers...by necessity. Has no bearing on intended use orientation and provides no meaningful information as to Apple's intentions either other than nobody is going to want a narrow keyboard. Using the Smart Cover vertically is a pain? How so? It folds back flat. Zero issues. And if you want to prop up the iPad with the SmartCover, then yes, use it horizontally. Another design choice out of necessity. The iPad isn't that lightweight and a case design that could prop it up in portrait would need to have quite some design to prevent the iPad from falling back. The iPad is intended to be used however you want in the end, and it's equally intended to be used in portrait as it is landscape. You're literally creating an issue that isn't there. And your insistence that using it in portrait is somehow wrong and unintended by the maker is also ridiculous. How hard is it to not cover up the camera in landscape? I'll tell you. Not hard at all. 
    muthuk_vanalingam