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Stock-outs of Apple's AirPort Extreme could hint at new 802.11ac model  

post #1 of 75
Thread Starter 
Availability of the AirPort Extreme base station has run out at some major third-party resellers, potentially signaling that an updated model with support for 802.11ac could be en route.

As of Monday, the online stores of both Amazon and Best Buy were out of stock of Apple's AirPort Extreme Wireless Base Station. Limited availability of the AirPort Extreme comes as Apple is gearing up for a major holiday shopping season, where the company is expected to introduce numerous new products.

Limited availability of Apple hardware is often a sign that the company is phasing out current models in anticipation of the debut of updated hardware. The AirPort Extreme was last given a minor spec bump in June of 2011, when it gained a 2.8 times power boost for stronger Wi-Fi connections.

AppleInsider first reported in January that Apple could begin deploying support for the new 802.11ac specification this year, adding so-called "Gigabit Wi-Fi" to new AirPort base stations.

AirPort Extreme


The 802.11ac standard is the latest revision of Wi-Fi, but it has not yet been formally adopted, and isn't expected to be ratified until early next year. The lack of finalization and 802.11ac-compatible devices on the market has not, however, stopped some companies from publicly releasing the first 802.11ac routers this year.

Client devices compatible with the 802.11ac standard are expected to be available by the end of this year, with widespread adoption picking up in 2013. But Apple has a history of being ahead of the curve with the release of new wireless standards.

In January of 2007, Apple announced that its new AirPort base stations and Apple TV set-top box included support for draft 802.11n specifications that had not yet been finalized. The company also secretly included support for "draft-n" in its previously released Core 2 Duo Macs.



Apple's support for 802.11n came nearly three years ahead of the formal ratification of the Wi-Fi standard in October of 2009.

While still officially under development, 802.11ac promises initial speeds of around a gigabit, which is significantly faster than the 450-megabit speeds that can be achieved with the current standard, 802.11n. The new Wi-Fi standard will also keep network performance at high levels when multiple devices are connected to the same router.
post #2 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Limited availability of the AirPort Extreme comes as Apple is gearing up for a major fall, where the company is expected to introduce numerous new products.

Really? Perhaps Fall quarter?

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

post #3 of 75
Does this mean the iPhone 5 might get it too?
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
post #4 of 75
Wireless hula hoop! I want one.
post #5 of 75
time to get the last gen refurb
post #6 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Does this mean the iPhone 5 might get it too?

Well, if all rumors are correct and we get an iPad Mini and rMBP 13" plus refreshes of iPod models including Wifi added to the nano...then this would be a very good time to upgrade to 802.11ac.  Purportedly as fast as CAT5 connections over Wifi.  Would be just what the iPads/iPods/iPhones and MB's need for that extra something over everyone else...not that they need any more help.

 

Sucks for me since I just upgraded to the AP Ext. a few months ago.

 

Addition: I'm kind of surprised they didn't adopt it in the July Macbook refresh.  That would be my only queue that we won't see 802.11ac until next year's refresh.

post #7 of 75
Or they might just ditch it. Airport Express now looks pretty similar to Aiport Extreme, so they might just go along with one of them.
post #8 of 75
I was wondering when they were going to announce 802.11ac. Linksys and others have announced routers, but I'm not sure how well they are selling. Obviously the final specs have not been finalized, but I'm sure if they announce something ahead of time, they either know what the final specs are or can alter it with Firmware if need be.

Either way, 802.11ac is MUCH needed.
post #9 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Does this mean the iPhone 5 might get it too?

 


I would highly doubt it.  For one, it's not needed, 802.11n is plenty fast for a phone especially when it's still faster than the fastest LTE networks today.  Also, the iPhone never got the fastest wifi connectivity in the past for its time.  e.g. The iPhone 3GS still only had 802.11g when 802.11n had been in use for years, but not ratified (finally) for a few more months after the 3GS introduction.  802.11ac hasn't been ratified yet, so I don't think it would be used in an iPhone till then and until most networks are already using the new standard for compatibility reasons and not necessarily speed.  (Though backward compatibility has been pretty good since 802.11g anyway.)  

 

The iPhone is going to use the least power hungry Wifi radios, and right now I'm sure it's the current 802.11n (2.4 GHz only) radio.

post #10 of 75

Ok ... overkill.  802.11n gives you dual band and 450 Mbps goodness - with great range.  Now, if you are sitting on a SSD RAID and feel the need to stream dozens of 1080p video to a couple dozen HDTV sets in your house - then perhaps this is for you.  Face it, whether you are a fan of DSL or cable - neither of these deliver half the bandwidth that 802.11ac utilizes.  Even the much vaunted Google Fiber, which may have 1 Gbps on the local network - will have bandwith much lower than this.  I'm luck to see 16 Mbps on my cable - and my hard drives are incapable of supporting more than quick bursts of speeds anywhere close to what the 802.11n standard gives.

 

Until we see ISP's offering bandwidths 10-50x faster than they are currently delivering - this is a standard that just doesn't make any sense.

 

That said ... I still want one.

post #11 of 75
There is only one thing I need from the AE, more than 3 ethernet ports! But I am sure, Apple, in its quest to make everything smaller/thinner without regard to the needs of the people that are actually using it, will probably drop all wired ports.

Rant over...cool 802.11ac.

-kpluck

P.S. on a completely unrelated note, my god does the site redesign suck.

Do you use MagicJack?

The default settings will automatically charge your credit card each year for service renewal. You will not be notified or warned in anyway. You can turn auto renewal off.

Do you use MagicJack?

The default settings will automatically charge your credit card each year for service renewal. You will not be notified or warned in anyway. You can turn auto renewal off.

post #12 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

... 802.11ac is MUCH needed.

For what?  Perhaps commercial use, but the Apple routers are not designed for heavy industrial/commercial use (ie. Hospitals, factories, businesses).  Your best ISP is still stuck at speeds that make 802.11n seem about a decade ahead of their time.

 

Now, if you have a bunch of SSD's in a RAID configuration (you will not see sustained Gigabit datarates with non-SSD drives) and feel the need to stream more than 6 streams of 1080p video, simultaneously - then 802.11ac should work well.  But, if you only have a a few streams of 1080p video you have to watch simulatneously - the 802.11n should work just fine.

post #13 of 75

I wonder if they will also tweak the "new iPad" (so-called iPad 3), to include this after a certain manufacturing date.

 

Typically, when everyone is at home -- we have 3-6 iPads going most afternoons and evenings -- so this would be a real boon for households with many iDevices.

 

In another thread I speculated that one of the reasons for the "new iPad" name was to allow tweaking of device capabilities between major releases.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I have been thinking about this a bit since the new iPad was announced as "the new iPad" instead of the "iPad 3".

 

Apple, obviously, made an overt effort to remove the generational number from the iPad... similar to the way Apple names other products -- it's an iMac 27" not an iMac 27" 2 (or 2012), and a MacBook Air...

 

Why would they do that?  

 

I can think of several reasons:

  • delink the device from a presumed [annual] release cycle
  • allow [more] configuration/bundlng options within the device 
  • delink the device from major technology availability
  • allow intermediate upgrades
  • allow more flexibility in manufacturing, distribution and pricing
  • be more aggressive competitively

 

You can probably think of a few other reasons.

 

It will be interesting if the Wednesday announcement includes the "the new iPhone"  or the "iPhone 5" (6, or whatever).

 
 

 

This, faster WiFi, would also differentiate the iPad(s) from the latest Amazon, Google and MS (whatever, whenever) announcements.

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
post #14 of 75

Ugh, now I have to find someone to whom I can sell our as-yet-unused current-gen model… Knew I shouldn't have bought it until we got the house rewired. 

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
post #15 of 75
When none of their Macs support it? With the iPhone & iPad not being able to utilize it? I reckon if their new iMac refresh had the hardware it could be possible.

I'd rather they did a PoE Express. I'd buy 4 at launch.
post #16 of 75
Originally Posted by ChristophB View Post
When none of their Macs support it?

 

Yes. How do you think standards get adopted? And we don't know if they don't support it; Apple might be able to "turn on" 802.11ac on the newest models like they did with N.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
post #17 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Ok ... overkill.  802.11n gives you dual band and 450 Mbps goodness - with great range.  Now, if you are sitting on a SSD RAID and feel the need to stream dozens of 1080p video to a couple dozen HDTV sets in your house - then perhaps this is for you.  Face it, whether you are a fan of DSL or cable - neither of these deliver half the bandwidth that 802.11ac utilizes.  Even the much vaunted Google Fiber, which may have 1 Gbps on the local network - will have bandwith much lower than this.  I'm luck to see 16 Mbps on my cable - and my hard drives are incapable of supporting more than quick bursts of speeds anywhere close to what the 802.11n standard gives.

 

Until we see ISP's offering bandwidths 10-50x faster than they are currently delivering - this is a standard that just doesn't make any sense.

 

That said ... I still want one.

 

Our household video library of 1,000 videos resides on a Promise Pegasus 12 TB RAID attached to the latest iMac 27" with Thunderbolt.  This can be feeding up to 7 iPads (more likely 3 or 4) at any given time.  We also have NetFlix and Hulu Streaming from the Internet.  I think this would be a boon for the next 5 years. 

 

If the new iMacs, Airports and iPads have this -- we will probably upgrade.

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
post #18 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

...on a completely unrelated note, my god does the site redesign suck.

I agree.

AI needs more ads on the front page. They may not realise it but they appear to have left a complete section in the middle that actually has useful information and content (apart from the fact that some of the text appears to be in a hard-to-read one 'Retina-pixel' wide font only). ;-)

And they really don't seem to like iOS devices, do they?
post #19 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Ugh, now I have to find someone to whom I can sell our as-yet-unused current-gen model… Knew I shouldn't have bought it until we got the house rewired. 

eBay is your friend.

A greedy little fee-charging friend, but a friend nonetheless. ;-)
post #20 of 75

The 6th Generation AE (Airport Extreme) will support the new 5th Generation 5G WiFi based on the new 802.11AC standard; which is expected to remain in draft until next year.  Broadcom already has a chip to utilize this called BCM4335.  My prediction is that the first Apple product to utilize this will be the iPad IV in March 2013.

post #21 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yes. How do you think standards get adopted? And we don't know if they don't support it; Apple might be able to "turn on" 802.11ac on the newest models like they did with N.

Maybe.

Not this way.

Teardowns would have revealed the ac chipsets. Broadcom debuted the mobile versions in late july. Teardown info I read on the 2012 MBs still had a BC n solution. I looked for it when debating on a Retina 15" purchase and figured I'd hold off till the subtle refresh in Q1. And isn't the wifi on the iPad being fronted by an SD I/O interface? That won't approach n speeds.
post #22 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

There is only one thing I need from the AE, more than 3 ethernet ports! But I am sure, Apple, in its quest to make everything smaller/thinner without regard to the needs of the people that are actually using it, will probably drop all wired ports.
Rant over...cool 802.11ac.
-kpluck
P.S. on a completely unrelated note, my god does the site redesign suck.

 

Yeah, clearly Apple's staggering success is because it creates products 'without regards to the needs of the people that are actually using them'. What you meant to say was, it makes products without regards to the needs of niche people such as yourself, who don't represent the needs of the MAJORITY of the people who use the product. Try to look beyond your own specific situation and realize that there's probably a very small percentage of people who need more than 3 wired connections to their router, seeing as the majority of all purchased devices these days are wireless. How many people have more than 3 wired devices in the same room as their router, or willing to run ethernet cables through their walls? I can't imagine that this would be a practical requirement in anything other than an office environment, in which case needs are totally different and an AE might not be the best choice of device anyway. Yes, Apple does tend to draw a line in the sand somewhere between functionality and design aesthetic, but this line is usually rational and reasonable. 

 

On another note, would be sweet as hell if the next iPhone had 802.11ac, even though I probably wouldnt take advantage of it for a long time.  

post #23 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

Our household video library of 1,000 videos resides on a Promise Pegasus 12 TB RAID attached to the latest iMac 27" with Thunderbolt.  This can be feeding up to 7 iPads (more likely 3 or 4) at any given time.  We also have NetFlix and Hulu Streaming from the Internet.  I think this would be a boon for the next 5 years. 

 

If the new iMacs, Airports and iPads have this -- we will probably upgrade.

Ummm, are you aware that it only takes 4-8 Mbps to stream 1080p at 24 frames per second?  Thus, your present 802.11n will EASILY stream 10 devices - and leave you plenty left over for multiple streams of Netflix (which is still going to face a bottleneck at your ISP).

post #24 of 75

802.11AC isnt just useful for streaming HD video and large files.  SSD drives, Network Storage and upto 1Gbs internet connections are all available right now.  While very few have access to 1Gbs internet, both Verizon & Comcast offer 300+Mbs packages to those who want to pay for it.  Dont be surprised if those speeds continue to double or cheapen.. as other ISP's play catchup.  Hardware upgrades have considerably increased the horsepower of consumer devices like the AppleTV3, BluRay playback & 4K UltraHDTV.   And software upgrades to iOS & OSX now allow entire desktop/screen mirroring and sharing.  

 

I welcome any future AC products to help cut down on the network hiccups, buffering and helping all of these networked devices work as seemless as possible.  While my 2010 Airport Extreme dual band N router already can stream, mirror and transfer files at reasonable rates.  Its still area that can be improved on in terms of both speed & latency.  One area where this is very noticeable is when streaming an HD movie file and fast forwarding or rewinding.  I also notice hiccups and stuttering when switching from one Apple TV to another.  I have 4 ATVs in my home, so its pretty common for me to start watching a movie in the living room or basement.. and finish watching it in bed.

 

I can only imagine how much more my network will bog down when I finally get 6TB RAID5/6 Synology NAS up and running.. and begin using all of my data from it, including machine backups and media libraries.  Lastly one must also consider the sheer number of wireless devices now hanging off a single home/small office router.  I have counted 12 wifi devices that are currently connnected to mine, with several of those streaming gig+ HD video files (Xbox360, PS3, iPads, ATV's, etc).  So a faster processer, larger range 2012 Apple Extreme AC router to handle the main powerlifting NAS/LAN/Internet duties is welcomed.  I could then convert my 2010 dual band N model to bridge duty to help the weak signal areas in the basement & backyard.  I was honestly planning on getting a $99 2012 Airport Express dual band to accomplish that anyways.

 

Remember data storage, usage & transfer is only going to INCREASE in the future.  If a new standard is here, why not begin to support it now.. instead waiting a few years.

post #25 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

P.S. on a completely unrelated note, my god does the site redesign suck.

Completely agree with you on this comment. So much harder to read, very little contrast and harder to tell what text is the actual article. I couldn't find where to log in to make this comment until I came into the actual forum.

post #26 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

 

Addition: I'm kind of surprised they didn't adopt it in the July Macbook refresh.  That would be my only queue that we won't see 802.11ac until next year's refresh.

 

Could be one of two reasons.  The first is that despite the fact that 802.11ac chips were available at the launch of the Ivy Bridge MacBooks doesn't mean that Apple could get them in the quantity that they would have needed to do a product launch.  Apple sells about 4 million Macs per quarter and 3/4s of them are MacBooks.  Since the entire Macbook Air/Pro line refreshed at the same time you'd need 3 million+ chips in order to keep Apple's supply chain happy and that may not have been in the cards.  The current crop of 802.11c routers are likely selling only in the hundreds or thousands to the early adopter geek crowd (especially since 802.11ac has virtually no major laptop vendor support yet).

 

The other possibility is that the current MacBooks already have the capability but were waiting for a refresh of the Airport Extreme/Time Capsule.  That's not likely since we live in the world of iFixit which tears down everything Apple makes and reports on chip vendors.  If Apple had snuck this in, I think we'd have known about it.

 

If the 802.11ac standard does happen, it could be in time for a desktop refresh since the new iMac is due (and the Mac Mini).

post #27 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

... 802.11ac is MUCH needed.

For what?  Perhaps commercial use, but the Apple routers are not designed for heavy industrial/commercial use (ie. Hospitals, factories, businesses).  Your best ISP is still stuck at speeds that make 802.11n seem about a decade ahead of their time.

 

Now, if you have a bunch of SSD's in a RAID configuration (you will not see sustained Gigabit datarates with non-SSD drives) and feel the need to stream more than 6 streams of 1080p video, simultaneously - then 802.11ac should work well.  But, if you only have a a few streams of 1080p video you have to watch simulatneously - the 802.11n should work just fine.

 

Here are some reasons... 2K, 3K and 4K video.  The new iPad Retina has 1 Million more pixels than a 1080p HDTV.   The iPad can be coerced to play 2K video.   Final Cut Pro X handles 4K and 2K natively.  These are coming technologies.

 

I can play a 4K (4096x2304) or 2K(2048x1152)  QuickTime video mirrored AirPlay from my iMac to my AppleTV via WiFi Airport Extreme...  The 4K looks good on the HDTV, better on the Mac.  The 2K looks better on the iPad than on the iMac.

 

My point is that these technologies (2K and 4K digital) are here and being used -- we are going to want to stream them around the home or small office.

 

BTW, 4K is 1 Gig bps.


Edited by Dick Applebaum - 9/10/12 at 12:41pm
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
post #28 of 75
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post
BTW, 4K is 1 Gig bps.

 

Is that H.264 or HEVC? That's the key here.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
post #29 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

Our household video library of 1,000 videos resides on a Promise Pegasus 12 TB RAID attached to the latest iMac 27" with Thunderbolt.  This can be feeding up to 7 iPads (more likely 3 or 4) at any given time.  We also have NetFlix and Hulu Streaming from the Internet.  I think this would be a boon for the next 5 years. 

 

 

Dick, you're not normal.  Take that as you will :)

post #30 of 75

3 things I'd like to see in a new Airport, in this order:

 

1. Built-in cable modem

2. Additional power/range boost

3. More bandwidth

post #31 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Here are some reasons... 2K, 3K and 4K video.  The new iPad Retina has 1 Million more pixels than a 1080p HDTV.   The iPad can be coerced to play 2K video.   Final Cut Pro X handles 4K and 2K natively.  These are coming technologies.

 

I can play a 4K (4096x2304) or 2K(2048x1152)  QuickTime video mirrored AirPlay from my iMac to my AppleTV via WiFi Airport Extreme...  The 4K looks good on the HDTV, better on the Mac.  The 2K looks better on the iPad than on the iMac.

 

My point is that these technologies (2K and 4K digital) are here and being used -- we are going to want to stream them around the home or small office.

 

BTW, 4K is 1 Gig bps.

Just one question ... how do you intend to source that 4K? 

 

Internet won't be ready for the forseeable future.  No media - I question whether this will even be accepted by the public in any meanful manner.  I recall how 3D was presented, and it failed to impress. Blu-Ray isn't selling as hoped, either. 

 

When HDTV's came out, they were in the $10K range - the 4K sets are coming in at $20K - so in maybe 5-10 years, the prices will be in the range that the average consumer can comtemplate them.  But, in the meanwhile, we will need to revamp our entire internet infrastructure (ie. Fiber). 

 

Any way you look at this - we are 5-10 yrs before anything is remotely likely to happen.  With that said, why buy a 802.11ac router now, when the 802.11n standard is market dominant, inexpensive, well supported and is overkill for the internet speeds that 95% of the internet users have?  The HDTV was a dramatic improvement over the conventional TV experience - I haven't seen a 4K demo, but I just don't see myself tossing my 5 yr old 50" plasma away, and dropping that sort of money on a TV with a "better than HD" picture.  It's simply an issue of "how good, is good enough".  I submit that the market will simply say "HDTV is "good enough".".

 

As for the 4K, I'd wager your favorite adult beverage that this will be dismissed by the masses as yet another "fad", just like 3D, just like Blu-Ray, and just like the SA-CD audio format.  Are these formats superior?  Maybe, but it's always about the bang for the buck.

post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

For what?  Perhaps commercial use, but the Apple routers are not designed for heavy industrial/commercial use (ie. Hospitals, factories, businesses).  Your best ISP is still stuck at speeds that make 802.11n seem about a decade ahead of their time.

 

 

If you have  a large house and are receiving the wireless signal through multiple walls/floors, the wifi speed can easily start to bottleneck the internet speed. It's not 450Mbits wherever you are as long as you have signal, it starts to degrade the second you step away from the router. 

And that's not even considering faster local uses like transferring files between computers and streaming HD movies. 450Mbits is about 60 MB, most modern hard drives can read/write faster than that alone, let alone RAID or SSDs. 

post #33 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by tipoo View Post

 

If you have  a large house and are receiving the wireless signal through multiple walls/floors, the wifi speed can easily start to bottleneck the internet speed. It's not 450Mbits wherever you are as long as you have signal, it starts to degrade the second you step away from the router. 

And that's not even considering faster local uses like transferring files between computers and streaming HD movies. 450Mbits is about 60 MB, most modern hard drives can read/write faster than that alone, let alone RAID or SSDs. 

 

I used to think the same thing, but you have to understand what the 450 Mbps number means.  It's not comparable to Hard drive transfer rates.

 

Specifically, you don't actually get 60 MBps on a 450 Mbps wireless connection.  Actual data throughput is 1/2 to 1/3 of that number, so now you're down to 20-30 MBps throughput in real life.  See, for example, the second post on this thread.  http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1666359

 

Second, as you point out, you basically have to be on top of the router to see the full speed.  Add a wall or some distance, and suddenly you drop that by half again, so your 450 Mbps is now only around 100 Mpbs, which is a little over 10 MBps actual transfer speed.

 

Third, the 450 number is the whole wireless network, not each computer.  Unlike a wired network, it's it's not a full duplex number.

 

I have the current generation Airport Extreme, which does up to 300 Mbps on my MacBook Air.  When Time Machine is backing up, it saturates the wireless and slows down my internet connectivity.  And I don't have an especially fast hard drive or anything like that.

 

Bottom line is that your real word throughput is only a fraction of that 450 Mbps number, even under optimal conditions.  Add in some distance, and you're no longer looking so hot.  So better/faster wireless isn't just something for super power users.

post #34 of 75
@hodar,

I have 350KB/s down and 20KB/s up... Life it good and fast in my neck of the woods...
post #35 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

@hodar,
I have 350KB/s down and 20KB/s up... Life it good and fast in my neck of the woods...

That should be Megabits per second not Kilobytes per second.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

post #36 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

Our household video library of 1,000 videos resides on a Promise Pegasus 12 TB RAID attached to the latest iMac 27" with Thunderbolt.  This can be feeding up to 7 iPads (more likely 3 or 4) at any given time.  We also have NetFlix and Hulu Streaming from the Internet.  I think this would be a boon for the next 5 years. 

 

If the new iMacs, Airports and iPads have this -- we will probably upgrade.

 

My household has a video library of about 600 titles residing on a Drobo attached to a Mac Mini (2009).  I must not be living right. :-(

post #37 of 75
Originally Posted by Sevenfeet View Post
My household has a video library of about 600 titles residing on a Drobo attached to a Mac Mini (2009).  I must not be living right. :-(

 

Maybe just not as long yet.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
post #38 of 75
The site redesign reminds of SpyMac from back in the day.
I miss SpyMac.... especially JuicyApple.
post #39 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

There is only one thing I need from the AE, more than 3 ethernet ports! But I am sure, Apple, in its quest to make everything smaller/thinner without regard to the needs of the people that are actually using it, will probably drop all wired ports.
Rant over...cool 802.11ac.
-kpluck
P.S. on a completely unrelated note, my god does the site redesign suck.

Ever hear of an ethernet switch?

post #40 of 75
Well, as of Monday night, Amazon does have it. They didn't have it about about 3-4 weeks ago, but as I said, they do now. And Best Buy has it in stores, although not available for shipping for online orders. So I don't know if there really is this "limited availability" the article refers to.

And kpluck, I couldn't agree with you more about the site redesign!
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AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Stock-outs of Apple's AirPort Extreme could hint at new 802.11ac model