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GPS in iPhone?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Anyone read the legal information on their iphone? There is a paragragh that states:

If you use location based products and services, such as Google Maps for our mobile, you may be sending us location information. This information may reveal your actual location, such as GPS data, or it may not, such as when you submit a partial addess to look at a map of the area.

GPS built in but not activated? Preparing for the next release?
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

...

GPS built in but not activated? Preparing for the next release?

Doesn't mean that at all. However, if you are trying to conceal your whereabouts from someone who wants to find you, then the information you enter may be more valuable than your GPS location. Google Maps gives a hint at where you intend to go and the path you intend to follow to get there. If you search for a specific business, then anyone looking for you knows within a meter or so where you want to go. A combination of such information gives any group that wants to find you several high-probability locations to look for you or to keep track of your movements. As I said before, this is potentially more valuable than your specific location at one instant.
post #3 of 8
[mission impossible] da da da da da da da da da da da da da da beedadoo beedadoo [/mission impossible]
post #4 of 8
brings up a good question though ...

I got the impression that the iPhone didn't have a GPS chip....

But, I was also under the impression that such a chip was MANDATORY in US sold cell-phones (something to do with 911 service IIRC.)

So... IF the GPS chip IS in there, why not make it useable to apps ??
From out there on the moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, "Look at that!" -...
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From out there on the moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, "Look at that!" -...
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post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post

...

But, I was also under the impression that such a chip was MANDATORY in US sold cell-phones (something to do with 911 service IIRC.)

...

No, GPS is not mandatory. However, it is my understanding that all cell phones must be able to reach 911 even before activation. It is my impression that the iPhone does not comply with this law. Suffice it to say, I did not test my iPhone on 911 before I activated it. The location of a cell phone can be determined within certain limits by triangulating from nearby cell towers. This is not nearly as accurate as GPS, but it is sufficient in many locations.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

No, GPS is not mandatory. However, it is my understanding that all cell phones must be able to reach 911 even before activation. It is my impression that the iPhone does not comply with this law. Suffice it to say, I did not test my iPhone on 911 before I activated it. The location of a cell phone can be determined within certain limits by triangulating from nearby cell towers. This is not nearly as accurate as GPS, but it is sufficient in many locations.

It does comply with the 911 law. I dialed it while waiting for my activation, and waiting, and waiting. Needless to say I ended the call as soon as it started to ring. Must have been fast enough as I didn't get a call back.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by physguy View Post

It does comply with the 911 law. I dialed it while waiting for my activation, and waiting, and waiting. Needless to say I ended the call as soon as it started to ring. Must have been fast enough as I didn't get a call back.

Or they just didn't care. When I was a paramedic, we would routinely get "light ups" that would show an incoming caller only to disconnect in a split second. Some dispatchers wouldn't call back, some would. Almost all the time it was a kid or somebody like you testing the system.

FYI, your information is displayed on the screen BEFORE your phone starts ringing. There is a about a five second delay while the caller information is routed through Miami and then to your local ESAP.

Some places do not have enhanced-911, so if you're city/county does not have E-911 then they had no idea who attempted to call them.

Finally, those that call with "Quick Service" have no way of receiving an incoming call. So your inactivated cell phone wouldn't display a phone number, and there would be no way for them to call you back. If you called from an inactivated land line, they would have the address but couldn't call you back. That usually results in a visit from an officer or deputy.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by physguy View Post

It does comply with the 911 law. I dialed it while waiting for my activation, and waiting, and waiting. ...

That's a relief.
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