FCC to investigate markets where iPhone is not available

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 87
    bigmc6000bigmc6000 Posts: 767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    Sorry, but this is just baseless obfuscation and FUD strewing.



    Sorry indeed... The guy asks a good question (maybe he does take it a little too far but the root of his concerns are valid) and you write it off as FUD because you don't want to answer with the obvious "Gov't mandating of luxury markets doesn't work."



    There's a reason the XM Sirius merger went through - it's a luxury market - just like the iPhone and broadband internet. (What about all the poor people living in places that do have smart phones and broadband but can't afford it let alone a computer to access it - still can't see the forest for the trees huh?)
  • Reply 42 of 87
    bigmc6000bigmc6000 Posts: 767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Providing internet and cellphone access to rural areas would make sense for all these reasons too - for instance, a farmer can check on real-time futures prices for commodities, can call people (e.g., hired help, suppliers, customers) from his tractor in the middle of his farm, can access distance-learning resources to educate himself and his family, etc.



    And, putting those in place would be a jobs program too (although that is not the best reason).



    The article clearly states that they are talking only about iPhone and other smart phones not cell phones at all. As the market currently exists you can use a random POS phone to get quotes fed to you on soybeans or corn or whatever the farmer is growing. Also, said farmer doesn't need a smart phone to call people.



    Also, that's a nice jab there at the end - he's a farmer so he obviously must need an education - I swear, some of you people who think you're so much better because you've had the internet and live in the city...
  • Reply 43 of 87
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,631member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    Sorry indeed... The guy asks a good question (maybe he does take it a little too far but the root of his concerns are valid) and you write it off as FUD because you don't want to answer with the obvious "Gov't mandating of luxury markets doesn't work."



    No, it's simply fear-mongering and doesn't deserve a response, which would legitimize it, beyond pointing that out.
  • Reply 44 of 87
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,943member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    Also, that's a nice jab there at the end - he's a farmer so he obviously must need an education - I swear, some of you people who think you're so much better because you've had the internet and live in the city...



    Nice one, he is a farmer because he probably wants to be a farmer and that is not a bad thing, in some regards that is a really good thing compared to the alternatives. Oh some argue those old one room school houses provided better educations too so doing online classes in a downgrade.
  • Reply 45 of 87
    bigmc6000bigmc6000 Posts: 767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    No, it's simply fear-mongering and doesn't deserve a response, which would legitimize it, beyond pointing that out.



    Uhhuh... (don't want to legitmize your response anymore than just saying that either)
  • Reply 46 of 87
    bigmc6000bigmc6000 Posts: 767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post


    Nice one, he is a farmer because he probably wants to be a farmer and that is not a bad thing, in some regards that is a really good thing compared to the alternatives. Oh some argue those old one room school houses provided better educations too so doing online classes in a downgrade.



    What are books anyway??? I mean, there's no possible way a kid could learn proper history or math or science or biology unless they are using a text that was updated just last week. I mean, history is changing all the time and math, wow, I mean, yesterday 2+1 = 4 tomorrow - who knows!! *sarcasm*
  • Reply 47 of 87
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,943member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beauty of Bath View Post


    There are essentially two models for rights.



    1) You have the right to do anything you want unless prohibited. - Was the US



    2) You have the right to do nothing other than that which is expressly permitted. - China



    Which system would you prefer?





    .



    Oh Driving when it was consider traveling was right, but our government turned it into a privilege to they can tax it.
  • Reply 48 of 87
    When has it been the law that an item MUST be available for sale everywhere?



    I don't think the iPhone is a "utility" device / service.



    As much as I hate AT&T the FCC should stay out of this.
  • Reply 49 of 87
    magic_almagic_al Posts: 325member
    It may come as a surprise to anyone who doesn't live here that the iPhone is not sold or supported in most of the Great Plains states such as South Dakota. There is GSM coverage in the larger towns and corridors, but it's not AT&T. AT&T will not let you sign up with a zip code from this area. You can't "legitimately" activate an iPhone, but you can unlock and jailbreak and sign up with whatever GSM carrier will have you. If you sign up with AT&T using the zip code of a different city, but use partner coverage all the time, eventually they'll cancel you for excessive roaming.



    There's no reason for not being able to use an iPhone here besides AT&T being exclusive and not wanting to be here. I'm glad the FCC is looking into this.



    "I don't think the iPhone is a "utility" device / service." Who's to say what phone service in 2009 should consist of? Technology advances but we're not all entitled to advance with it? When you pay your phone bill part of it is a tax for universal access. As a country we believe telephone technology is critical to modern life and must be available to all. What if 100 years ago we said, only urban areas can have voice telephones, everyone else can settle for telegraph or pony express?
  • Reply 50 of 87
    I live in Eastern Oregon, and you can't get the iPhone here, either. Somehow, I've made it through my day to day routines without an iPhone, or some gov't bureaucrat manhandling private businesses for my supposed self-interest.

    NO ONE is being denied essential services here. Leave the private sector alone, let the free market work! If there is profit incentive to have an iPhone over here, it will come in due time.
  • Reply 51 of 87
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,185member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    Also, that's a nice jab there at the end - he's a farmer so he obviously must need an education - I swear, some of you people who think you're so much better because you've had the internet and live in the city...



    That is an idiotic statement. And, you sound pretty thin-skinned too.



    Lots of people - urban/rural, executives/farmers, poor/rich, men/women - need continuing education. Sometimes, you can live in a place where the economics of bricks-and-mortar education provision are such that it does not get provided at all. Virtual learning is a tremendous tool in that regard, and access to it can truly change lives.



    If anyone is being condescending it is you, when you so blatantly imply that a cell phone will suffice for these folks, since their lives' needs can be met with technology from three decades ago. In today's high-tech (incl. in farming), knowledge-driven, networked, rapidly-changing world, being connected to the internet and having access to tools such as smartphones are for everyone, including farmers.



    Stick to the issue at hand, which is simply: are the benefits worth the costs.
  • Reply 52 of 87
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    They aren't talking about forcing AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, et al. to provide service in rural areas. This is about customers in rural areas not having the choice to get iPhones, Pres, etc. even though there are wireless companies in their areas willing to provide them service, simply because one of the large companies has them locked out. Clearly this is not in best interest of consumers, and the idea that there is a "second class" of citizens in this country who ought not be able to enjoy the benefits of living in this country simply because of the accident of their place of residence is entirely elitist and undemocratic.



    And, yes, every home in this country ought to have broadband access, although, not necessarily via fiber optics. Lack of access to communications technology, just like lack of access to education, undermines our democracy and when the business practices of large companies go against the public interest, it is the obligation of our government to intervene.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    Ok, seriously, wtf? You CHOSE to live where you live. If you chose to live in a place that's remote you give up some of the luxuries of living urban. Is the senate going to get together to figure out why BFE Montana doesn't have a 12 screen, DLP, stadium seating, 7.1 surround cineplex as well? Personally I could live without the iPhone more than I could a decent movie theatre...



    Honestly, this sense of entitlement that so many people seem to have needs to stop. 99% of what people think are 'rights' anymore are actually privileges (like driving).



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    Sorry indeed... The guy asks a good question (maybe he does take it a little too far but the root of his concerns are valid) and you write it off as FUD because you don't want to answer with the obvious "Gov't mandating of luxury markets doesn't work."



    There's a reason the XM Sirius merger went through - it's a luxury market - just like the iPhone and broadband internet. (What about all the poor people living in places that do have smart phones and broadband but can't afford it let alone a computer to access it - still can't see the forest for the trees huh?)



    ITS a free trade issue .



    YOU CANNOT RESTRICT THE SALE OF A PRODUCT IN A REGION OF THIS COUNTRY ,



    Coors beer found this out .



    Also the federal and state gov't grant the phone companies the right to exist thru a series of trade offs, the phone companies get miles and miles of good roads to drive there trucks . They also get many right's of way like > to put up all those poles and wires.



    The telecoms also can act in certain restricted ways as a monopoly.



    The federal gov't and the state gov't spend billions subsidizing the cost of the past and current wiring of America and all those far flung roads we build and maintain that they use .



    Because the Gov.;t understands the importance of a free and easy access to communication ,we do these things to keep the lines open. Democracy is build on these kind of freedoms ,



    And broadband is fast going from a luxury to a needed item . Leaving 10 percent of the population out in the cold is against treating the american population in a fair and equal manner



    With in reason

    WITH IN REASON the telecom;s will have to wire the whole country as best as they can , and make sure that all there products are made available in some way and form .



    THERE IS NO SECOND CLASS IN AMERICA



    The taxes small town America pays ensures equal treatment when the gov't supports any industry.



    I think it sucks the way SMALL town USA is sometimes treated. And apple should be told about this shabby shit going on

    i am from nyc
  • Reply 53 of 87
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beauty of Bath View Post


    There are essentially two models for rights.



    1) You have the right to do anything you want unless prohibited.



    2) You have the right to do nothing other than that which is expressly permitted.



    Which system would you prefer?





    .



    hey the bumper sticker crowd is here
  • Reply 54 of 87
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    This is hilarious.

    After all the pissing and moaning from everyone about exclusivity, and how much greater it would be if Apple would just sell an unlocked phone, you all suddenly get all 'libertarian' about the 'free market' and choices.

    What a bunch of hypocrites.

    This is exactly what the FCC should be doing... busting up the collusion between handset makers and cell phone monopolies.

    Go get 'em.
  • Reply 55 of 87
    Seriously, does the FCC have nothing better else to do?! If they're going to be this ridiculous then, they need to find out why Verizon doesn't have FIOS in my area!!!



    Not services are GUARANTEED in all areas that's why you check the map.
  • Reply 56 of 87
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    My iPhone doesn't even work underwater. The coverage is not only lousy, but the iPhone stopped functioning after just a few seconds. I feel cheated. Above all else, the FCC should look into underwater cell phone rights.
  • Reply 57 of 87
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IchiroBoston View Post


    When has it been the law that an item MUST be available for sale everywhere?



    I don't think the iPhone is a "utility" device / service.



    As much as I hate AT&T the FCC should stay out of this.



    FCC- Freaking C*ck council.
  • Reply 58 of 87
    bigmc6000bigmc6000 Posts: 767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    That is an idiotic statement. And, you sound pretty thin-skinned too.



    Lots of people - urban/rural, executives/farmers, poor/rich, men/women - need continuing education. Sometimes, you can live in a place where the economics of bricks-and-mortar education provision are such that it does not get provided at all. Virtual learning is a tremendous tool in that regard, and access to it can truly change lives.



    If anyone is being condescending it is you, when you so blatantly imply that a cell phone will suffice for these folks, since their lives' needs can be met with technology from three decades ago. In today's high-tech (incl. in farming), knowledge-driven, networked, rapidly-changing world, being connected to the internet and having access to tools such as smartphones are for everyone, including farmers.



    Stick to the issue at hand, which is simply: are the benefits worth the costs.



    My bad, I speak from the actual experience of living in this area and think having a regular ol' cell phone is just fine. You made absolutely no compelling argument whatsoever for smart phone vs regular phone. You said you wanted them to be able to call people when they needed help - k, check and you said you wanted them to be able to access real time futures quotes (which really is pointless since they can't sell sh!t until it's farmed and even then it takes time to actually sell it - checking a few times a day is more than enough - having relatives in the industry I can tell you that for a 100% certainty).



    How exactly am I being condescending to my own heritage? I think people can get along just fine with regular cell phones - I think 100% of us could just along just fine with regular cell phones - the feds don't need to be spending our money (which they already seem to have perfected sadly) on regulating a luxury market.



    *sarcasm* Personally I think every American should have a Porsche dealer within 20 mins of their house so they can have access to this luxury that so obviously makes life so much better *sarcasm*



    I am being condescending to you because you, just like so many other people, seem to think you know whats best for other people. How about you concern yourself with what's best for you and stop projecting your personal values (like an addiction to technology) onto others who don't share your addiction.



    EDIT: Virtual learning is 100% overrated - really... If you really think it's that much better than you really truly are delusioned by your addiction to technology (math doesn't change, spelling and grammar don't change, most everything except for evolution doesn't change science and history, despite the efforts of many, doesn't change either - a book and a good teacher can do amazing things...) Also, if someone wants to be a farmer what's the point in making then learn a bunch of stuff that doesn't even remotely matter to them? I had to take Mythology in college to fill a general education requirement - yeah, it's had a HUGE impact on my life. Knowing a whole bunch of sh!t makes you a good Jeopardy contestant - not an intelligent person. We really shouldn't worry too much about nurses knowing advanced calculus or mathematicians knowing the names of all the organs in the human body. But I suppose that's an argument for another day
  • Reply 59 of 87
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    My bad, I speak from the actual experience of living in this area and think having a regular ol' cell phone is just fine. You made absolutely no compelling argument whatsoever for smart phone vs regular phone. You said you wanted them to be able to call people when they needed help - k, check and you said you wanted them to be able to access real time futures quotes (which really is pointless since they can't sell sh!t until it's farmed and even then it takes time to actually sell it - checking a few times a day is more than enough - having relatives in the industry I can tell you that for a 100% certainty).



    How exactly am I being condescending to my own heritage? I think people can get along just fine with regular cell phones - I think 100% of us could just along just fine with regular cell phones - the feds don't need to be spending our money (which they already seem to have perfected sadly) on regulating a luxury market.



    *sarcasm* Personally I think every American should have a Porsche dealer within 20 mins of their house so they can have access to this luxury that so obviously makes life so much better *sarcasm*



    I am being condescending to you because you, just like so many other people, seem to think you know whats best for other people. How about you concern yourself with what's best for you and stop projecting your personal values (like an addiction to technology) onto others who don't share your addiction.



    EDIT: Virtual learning is 100% overrated - really... If you really think it's that much better than you really truly are delusioned by your addiction to technology (math doesn't change, spelling and grammar don't change, most everything except for evolution doesn't change science and history, despite the efforts of many, doesn't change either - a book and a good teacher can do amazing things...) Also, if someone wants to be a farmer what's the point in making then learn a bunch of stuff that doesn't even remotely matter to them? I had to take Mythology in college to fill a general education requirement - yeah, it's had a HUGE impact on my life. Knowing a whole bunch of sh!t makes you a good Jeopardy contestant - not an intelligent person. We really shouldn't worry too much about nurses knowing advanced calculus or mathematicians knowing the names of all the organs in the human body. But I suppose that's an argument for another day



    Huh? Smartphones are meant to act like mini computers in people's lives. Normal phones are just for calling, SMS and basic stuff, not for other intensive activities. Smartphones are a plus for those who can afford it IMO.
  • Reply 60 of 87
    vineavinea Posts: 5,585member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lafe View Post


    I agree. I live in a rural area, and can't figure out why no senators are working to get me

    3G or DSL. We need connectivity. The posters who are slamming you and saying that

    those of us who choose to live in rural areas just have to suffer the inconvenience are not

    looking at the whole picture. Every area in the US should have these basic things, not just

    where the population density makes it super-profitable. I've been to rural areas in Europe

    where there is 3G. I've been to small villages in Bulgaria where ordinary people have

    affordable high-speed internet in their homes. Why is it there? Because the government

    and corporations care to provide service, knowing that it helps keep people connected,

    educated, buying things, etc. It's the right thing to do.



    If they can do it, why can't "the greatest, richest country in the world" do it?



    Have you looked at a map? Rural areas in Europe are not far from major metro areas.



    If you want high speed then buy it. Hughes sells satellite internet services at 1-5 MBps. That's on par with my WiMax service but slower than my FiOS.



    http://www.satellitestarinternet.com...FZVB5godghe1AA
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