Report: iTunes 9 to support DVD ripping, Facebook

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  • Reply 21 of 67
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by astrosmash View Post


    Fake and stupid. Stop posting this crap.



    Really- I totally agree- just stirs up a bunch of Pollyanna fantasies and what-ifs.
  • Reply 22 of 67
    Not only is this irresponsible reporting--far too many *major* problems with those 'screenshots' have already been discovered, not to mention obvious issues with things like DVD ripping--the title is also misleading. Very disappointing content, AppleInsider.
  • Reply 23 of 67
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post










    perhaps but not until the days that blu-ray is bigger than DVDs so who would want to pirate a DVD.



    The movie studios yield a lot more weight than the music industry. It will never happen.
  • Reply 24 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Magic_Al View Post


    I doubt Hollywood will ever allow DVD ripping. It would confuse their public stance that copying DVDs under the DMCA is always illegal. They feel entitled to make you buy the same movie multiple times to make up for piracy of other movies.



    "Digital copy", including an iTunes-ready file on the DVD in addition to the regular DVD data, is not a great deal for video quality because you have two copies of the movie on the DVD which means the bitrates must be lower than if there was one. Unfortunately only videophiles and technical purists would whine about that, as proven by the market's indifference to "superbit" DVDs that eschew bonus features in favor of using the full disc capacity for the feature film at maximum quality.



    Yeah, the only way I can see this happening in iTunes is if it encodes the file for use on iPhones/iPods and if the conversion and removal of the DVD CSS also requires an iTunes account because it applies FairPlay to the file so it can't be freely distributed and played.
  • Reply 25 of 67
    irelandireland Posts: 17,684member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    A crime? Pffft.

    At least you can play a DVD in any other DVD player whereas not so with music purchased at iTunes.



    What's DRM?
  • Reply 26 of 67
    nicuknicuk Posts: 4member
    Deleted
  • Reply 27 of 67
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    If iTunes 9 has the ability to import DVDs (decent quality for Apple TV playback), I will die a very happy man.



    If true, this is the best news since Apple implemented gapless playback.
  • Reply 28 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nicuk View Post


    The version I have installed is running on the upcoming Snow Leopard. I do not know if the version is 32 or 64 bit.



    SYSTEM PROFILER and ACTIVITY MONITOR will both tell you if it's 64-bit.





    PS: It's odd that iDVD opened up and not DVD Player.
  • Reply 29 of 67
    virgil-tb2virgil-tb2 Posts: 1,416member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


    but that isn't what it is. Digital copy is done one of two ways

    1. a second disk that has the device friendly version

    2. a download code for itunes



    the second is the more common. ...



    And both of them suck.



    I've bought a few discs with digital copies now and almost all are just stupid marketing ploys that force you to go to the website of the media company that's ripping you off for the disc in the first place.



    <sarcasm> Sure, I *love* to pay 40 or 50 bucks for something that's only worth ten and then be forced to watch advertisements before I watch the movie and then be forced to go to a website to view more advertisements and promotions before I get my digital copy. </sarcasm>



    Even one of the ones I bought that had a second disk with the digital copy on it also required me to go to some stupid website to "authorise." The one movie I bought that had a plain old digital copy on the disc with no fussing around gave me a file that had no better quality than the average torrent download, but was at least twice the size of the average torrent download, and it wasn't even HD. It also stuttered when it played.



    I think the so-called digital copy thing is just a marketing game the studios are playing with us. It's pretty obvious that they haven't actually thought much about what the end user actually wants.



    What most people want in a digital copy is just to be able to buy a good quality movie at a reasonable price and to be able to own it free of DRM. What most people want in terms of a physical disc is the ability to move the movie off the disc onto their computer for archiving and their portable devices or TVs for watching, also without DRM.
  • Reply 30 of 67
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,147member
    Ripping DVDs in iTunes is a great feature. It means no more 3rd party apps and kludging to do what one should have been able to do from day one.



    Will it allow ripping to Apple TV? Probably not.



    Will it rip all DVDs? Probably not. Probably only so-called "digital copy" disks that don't actually have a digital copy. No more downloading.



    I'd rather see a blue-ray drive and an HDMI output port on new Macs, but this is an iTunes thread, not a Mac thread.
  • Reply 31 of 67
    floccusfloccus Posts: 138member
    Just what we need, something else to clutter up and further degrade facebook. I really don't care what my friends are listening to, and if I did I could simply ask them. Facebook was so much better before the era of constant status updates and all those damn quizzes and apps.



    As for these iTunes 9 features, DVD ripping will not be allowed, playback is possible (although I don't see why you'd want to use iTunes to do so). Support for other MP3 players is a v. small possibility. You can tell by how crappy the main tab for that Samsung player is that iTunes doesn't support native sync. I could however see Apple capitulating a bit and licensing the ability to sync to Palm and others, b/c then it just gives Apple one more thing to make fun of Palm for (Palm is so lame that they have to use OUR music management software!) Blu-ray support is pointless if no Macs have factory installed Blu-ray drives, although supporting burning Blu-ray discs could be a first step.
  • Reply 32 of 67
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,582member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jensonb View Post


    Do you know why that's never going to happen? Because that's a dumb name. Almost every replacement name people come up with for iTunes is not as good as iTunes, and most are retarded (iHub is a popular one which is equally stupid). Even if you got a name as good as iTunes, it wouldn't be good enough, because iTunes already has brand recognition. Brand recognition is worth a lot - it cuts down on marketing.



    Besides, in a few years, the meaning of "tunes" will change to include all the things people keep in iTunes. So, just give the language time to catch up and it will all make sense again.



    And, iMedia already doesn't make sense -- Apps aren't really media -- so the only thing left is iStuff, which is probably overly inclusive.
  • Reply 33 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    Besides, in a few years, the meaning of "tunes" will change to include all the things people keep in iTunes. So, just give the language time to catch up and it will all make sense again.



    And, iMedia already doesn't make sense -- Apps aren't really media -- so the only thing left is iStuff, which is probably overly inclusive.



    Coke no longer contains cocaine but we aren't rallying to change it's name. Diet, caffiene-free Pepsi has no sugar or caffiene to give you pep but you don't cry for that to be under a new name. It's silly to think that the name requires a change. The only reason to change the name of a product or company is if it fails and needs to be repackaged. Some examples are Play4Sure, Vista, .Mac.
  • Reply 34 of 67
    wobegonwobegon Posts: 764member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Apple is expected to release a new update to its iPod lineup in its September 9 event, which will likely also include an updated version of iTunes and possibly the long anticipated Apple TV 3.0 update adding support for HTTP Live Streaming, which has already shipped as part of iPhone 3.0 and will be part of the new QuickTime X in Mac OS X Snow Leopard.



    That is what I'm most interested in: Apple TV announcements.



    I certainly look forward to seeing what changes have been made to iTunes (namely the store itself; feels like it's in need of a facelift/speed up and the commenting system, especially for apps, is archaic) and iPods, but that's just it, those are all but guaranteed to receive attention.



    The Apple TV could use another revamp.



    - I want that wiimote-like pointer remote detailed in one of their patents for intuitive point-and-click menu browsing, web browsing, and perhaps manipulation of...third party Apple TV apps and games.



    - HTTP Live Streaming would be great for watching live (probably ad-supported) content of ANY kind, be it cable news, sports, or live video podcasts.



    - Hulu and/or Netflix InstantWatch integration would not only be big draws but they could also drive down movie and TV show pricing on iTunes.



    - Top it all off with playback of external, USB-tethered or Wi-Fi accessible DVD drives so users could watch their DVD collections through the Apple TV's slick, intuitive interface.
  • Reply 35 of 67
    chris_cachris_ca Posts: 2,543member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    If only this were true...



    Importing DVD's and Blu-ray should be as simple as clicking an import button in iTunes. It would be great if Apple were to take a stand on video DRM like they did with audio. Since the government is in the RIAA/MPAA's back pocket, we can only hope that another large company chooses to look out for the consumer \



    Since audio CDs did not (and still don't) have DRM, it is a different animal.
  • Reply 36 of 67
    There is always the possibility that iTunes could rip DVDs and still keep the DRM. Everyone is assuming that the ripping would leave a DRM free file, but there's no reason Apple couldn't keep either the original copy protection or add in a Fairplay key. Its not like videos are DRM free right now.



    Also, I think iTunes should be renamed Jukebox.
  • Reply 37 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post


    Yeah, the only way I can see this happening in iTunes is if it encodes the file for use on iPhones/iPods and if the conversion and removal of the DVD CSS also requires an iTunes account because it applies FairPlay to the file so it can't be freely distributed and played.





    In other words.. ripping a DVD in iTunes creates an iTunes Protected mp4 file! I'm thinking that ripping will occur for normal DVD's, and ripping for BluRay will be supported when BluRay ships those Discs that will support "1 legal copy". Who knows.. maybe BluRay Ripping will occur with the Protected MP4 file. This really isn't hard for apple to negotiate as they already sell hollywood movies that way.
  • Reply 38 of 67
    duecesdueces Posts: 89member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Messiah View Post


    I would LOVE to be able to rip my DVDs to my hard disk!!!



    Yeah, I know I can do it right now with Handbrake etc. - but I would love to be able to do it through something as intuitive as iTunes.



    I would be able to save so much space if I could bin the physical media and dump all the ripped files onto my Drobo.



    There is actually something much more intuitive than itunes that does this. Its called CloneDVD/AnyDVD. Yea you have to do it in Windows, but its head and shoulders above anything else out there.
  • Reply 39 of 67
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by webraider View Post


    In other words.. ripping a DVD in iTunes creates an iTunes Protected mp4 file! I'm thinking that ripping will occur for normal DVD's, and ripping for BluRay will be supported when BluRay ships those Discs that will support "1 legal copy". Who knows.. maybe BluRay Ripping will occur with the Protected MP4 file. This really isn't hard for apple to negotiate as they already sell hollywood movies that way.



    About time y'all caught up.



    "Apple can't support ripping commercial DVDs due to the DRM (although maybe they could make a deal with the studios to allow ripping if they then wrapped the resulting file in FairPlay)."



    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showp...5&postcount=78
  • Reply 40 of 67
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post


    And both of them suck.



    I've bought a few discs with digital copies now and almost all are just stupid marketing ploys that force you to go to the website of the media company that's ripping you off for the disc in the first place.



    Even one of the ones I bought that had a second disk with the digital copy on it also required me to go to some stupid website to "authorise." The one movie I bought that had a plain old digital copy on the disc with no fussing around gave me a file that had no better quality than the average torrent download, but was at least twice the size of the average torrent download, and it wasn't even HD. It also stuttered when it played.



    And which movies were those? I have a few Blu-Rays with digital copies, I just entered the code into iTunes, and it downloaded, I didn't have to go to any website.
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