Report: iTunes 9 to support DVD ripping, Facebook

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  • Reply 41 of 67
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    We had a topic here a few weeks ago about dvd ripping. Since i own about 400 dvd's

    Ifelt it would be nice to have the best of them on my macs . well the topic explained how to rip the dvd 's .

    and it has one extra step that sucks ,but i set it up at night and most times its a dig file by morn .and with boots you just drop the files on your drive and hit play .



    So weeks later i now have 45 digital movies for instant watching .I would love for a magic itunes convert button.
  • Reply 42 of 67
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    And which movies were those? I have a few Blu-Rays with digital copies, I just entered the code into iTunes, and it downloaded, I didn't have to go to any website.



    He bought back to the future 3 and dumb and dumberer
  • Reply 43 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    There is actually something much more intuitive than itunes that does this. Its called CloneDVD/AnyDVD. Yea you have to do it in Windows, but its head and shoulders above anything else out there.



    I completely agree, at least on the AnyDVD part. For the uninitiated, it's a driver that installs and transparently decrypts discs. It works on DVDs, Blu-ray, HD-DVD, CD-Audio, and more, and means you can simply drag the VIDEO_TS folder onto your hard drive -- or anything else you want. It not only handles basic CSS but also nearly every other method, including BS Plus. It's probably the most solid and frequently updated decryption software available.



    Sadly, it's only for Windows, and even more sadly, it's both commercial and proprietary. I've been thinking about the possibility of a FUSE or kernel filesystem for Linux/*BSD that basically does the same thing, removing CSS and other annoyances before passing control to UDF. I of course have nowhere near the ability (or guts, to fight the DMCA, as I live in the USA) to do so, but it's nice to dream.
  • Reply 44 of 67
    idunnoidunno Posts: 645member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Messiah View Post


    I would LOVE to be able to rip my DVDs to my hard disk!!!



    Yeah, I know I can do it right now with Handbrake etc. - but I would love to be able to do it through something as intuitive as iTunes.



    I would be able to save so much space if I could bin the physical media and dump all the ripped files onto my Drobo.



    That is exactly what I did, but (shh...) I sold all the physical media on eBay and cleaned up!
  • Reply 45 of 67
    The advantage Apple would have in letting other devices sync through iTunes would be extracting a licensing fee from the makers of other devices. Apple would then broaden control of music distribution through the iTunes Store, and still earn money from other device makers. This situation is probably preferable for them then having a court case rule against them to open up the iTunes platform in a situation where they earn no royalties.



    As to the DVD ripping, that might finally be an incentive to start buying DVDs again.
  • Reply 46 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ianmac47 View Post


    As to the DVD ripping, that might finally be an incentive to start buying DVDs again.



    Which is a reason why Apple wouldn?t want to spend money and time add that feature. They do have a digital download store to maintain and grow. Unless Apple has secured enough of the entire market to see a trend that can?t be stopped from overtaking the PC and home theater (which doesn?t seem possible at this time) there is no reason to offer such a service.
  • Reply 47 of 67
    palegolaspalegolas Posts: 1,289member
    If they really go through with this I'd be hoping that they produce an advanced quicktime or mp4 with embeded audio tracks and subtitles, so that one could actually have the full DVD with all interactive elements but in a compressed format. Maybe that's part of Cocktail?

    Also it makes sense Apple is trying to get movies into its devices other ways than with the iTunes Store. The majority of the world still can't buy movies on iTunes you know. So the AppleTV is pretty lame in most parts of the world.



    Ripping a DVD is most likely gonna end up, as people here pointed out, as a protected mp4. And it can play on the users machines that are tied to its own iTunes account. Maximum 5 machines, right? The digital copy act will probably be logged to the iTunes account. It sounds reasonable enough.



    A potential risk however could be that once the encryption happens ON THE MACHINE and not remotely on the iTunes server it probably won't be long til somebody breaks it.
  • Reply 48 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palegolas View Post


    A potential risk however could be that once the encryption happens ON THE MACHINE and not remotely on the iTunes server it probably won't be long til somebody breaks it.



    As I understand it, the FairPlay DRM for iTS content is done in iTunes once the file has been pre-porcessed by the user?s machine. The servers are just sending the requested data, not doing the legwork for tailoring the encrypted file for each user account.
  • Reply 49 of 67
    cu10cu10 Posts: 294member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


    that law has existed in the US for years. pretty much since things like ipods were first released. the way the law is written you are supposed to own the CD and if you trash it, sell it, give it away, you delete the digital copy (no one ever does). and no allowing others to just copy your digital copy. which of course many folks do.



    I looked and could not find that clause.



    http://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#114



    Please share the URL, thanks.
  • Reply 50 of 67
    I'd be more than surprised if the DVD copying rumor is even close to be true. The MPAA has tried to stop copying of any sort of the DVD standard, even protected managed copying. An old college buddy of mine just successfully argued the legal case for the MPAA against Realnetworks. If the MPAA was looking to do a deal with Apple, why prosecute Real for doing something similar?
  • Reply 51 of 67
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post


    Which is a reason why Apple wouldn?t want to spend money and time add that feature. They do have a digital download store to maintain and grow. Unless Apple has secured enough of the entire market to see a trend that can?t be stopped from overtaking the PC and home theater (which doesn?t seem possible at this time) there is no reason to offer such a service.



    A really good way to grow their digital video download service is to sell more AppleTVs so people can watch the movies on their TV. To sell more AppleTVs they need to make it a more attractive option to justify the upfront hardware cost. They do that by making it capable of playing the DVDs you already own.



    The iPod might have very well been a failure if you couldn't rip your CDs to play the music you already owned. It was only once there was a critical mass of iPod before iTunes music sales really took off. I think Apple has been short-sighted with the AppleTV by going straight for the forced iTunes sales for content rather than trying to first build a critical mass of hardware like they did with the iPod.
  • Reply 52 of 67
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post


    Which is a reason why Apple wouldn’t want to spend money and time add that feature. They do have a digital download store to maintain and grow. Unless Apple has secured enough of the entire market to see a trend that can’t be stopped from overtaking the PC and home theater (which doesn’t seem possible at this time) there is no reason to offer such a service.



    there is a long list of $20 - $30 apps on the internet that will rip any protected DVD, bypass the DRM and make the file iphone compatible in one step. buying music on the internet is one thing, people prefer DVD's to ITunes because DVD players are cheap. you can already get cheap blu-ray players for less than $200
  • Reply 53 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    A really good way to grow their digital video download service is to sell more AppleTVs so people can watch the movies on their TV. To sell more AppleTVs they need to make it a more attractive option to justify the upfront hardware cost. They do that by making it capable of playing the DVDs you already own.



    The iPod might have very well been a failure if you couldn't rip your CDs to play the music you already owned. It was only once there was a critical mass of iPod before iTunes music sales really took off. I think Apple has been short-sighted with the AppleTV by going straight for the forced iTunes sales for content rather than trying to first build a critical mass of hardware like they did with the iPod.



    The ATV seems to be neglected by Apple and if nothing is done, it's soon going to be forgotten...
  • Reply 54 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CU10 View Post


    I looked and could not find that clause.



    http://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#114



    Please share the URL, thanks.



    Thnaks for that.
  • Reply 55 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post


    <sarcasm> Sure, I *love* to pay 40 or 50 bucks for something that's only worth ten and then be forced to watch advertisements before I watch the movie and then be forced to go to a website to view more advertisements and promotions before I get my digital copy. </sarcasm>



    Where the heck are you buying DVD's for $40 to $50 for? Sarcasm is more effective if it's at least realistic.



    Quote:

    Even one of the ones I bought that had a second disk with the digital copy on it also required me to go to some stupid website to "authorise."



    Weird, the "stupid" place every digital copy I have required me to go was iTunes. That's the ONLY way an iTunes copy can work is to associate it with your iTunes. Again, if you're going to make stuff up, at least let it be realistic.



    Quote:

    The one movie I bought that had a plain old digital copy on the disc with no fussing around gave me a file that had no better quality than the average torrent download, but was at least twice the size of the average torrent download, and it wasn't even HD. It also stuttered when it played.



    Why would a DVD include an HD version of a movie anyway? Digital copies are intended for portable media players and since there's no (mainstream) PMP capable of playing even 720p HD content, an HD copy would sort of be a waste. As for the stuttering, sounds like either your computer or PMP sucks.



    Quote:

    What most people want in terms of a physical disc is the ability to move the movie off the disc onto their computer for archiving and their portable devices or TVs for watching, also without DRM.



    Sorry, but I think you're way on that assertion. I doubt the vast majority of the public gives a crap about doing anything with the disc other than putting it in their player and having it play. Which already works quite well. It's mostly only geeks on tech websites that really give a crap about digital copies. And as one of those geeks, I don't give a crap about digital copies.
  • Reply 56 of 67
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by caliminius View Post


    W

    Sorry, but I think you're way on that assertion. I doubt the vast majority of the public gives a crap about doing anything with the disc other than putting it in their player and having it play. Which already works quite well. It's mostly only geeks on tech websites that really give a crap about digital copies. And as one of those geeks, I don't give a crap about digital copies.



    Well if you are one of the millions of buisness travelers

    having 10 or 15 top movies available can be a godsend on a long boring trip .

    and at night in the hotel room you can also play your movie's .

    So digital copies have a place right now instead of dozens of discs being carried around.



    That why the MBA is such a hit . Reducing all the junk and weight we carry on longs trips makes good sence .



    And we can also stop the pirates at the same time .
  • Reply 57 of 67
    antkm1antkm1 Posts: 1,441member
    personally, i think it's crazy that iTunes doesn't allow you to rip your own movies. This should have happened when they first released the Apple TV for sale, and is probably why the sales aren't through the roof right now. Yes, i know you can rip movies other ways, but i'm married to iTunes and not inclined to spend hours to do something that should already be available on iTunes.



    my other beef with the iTunes store is that you can't instant watch TV for free (at least the shows that are on free broadcasting networks, and that you can already watch on HULU with commercials). You can't even RENT a TV show! That's a good way for people not to come back to the iTunes store. I have no problems with HBO/Skinomax/Showtime TV shows with a "BUY" or god-forbid "RENT" button. But if NBC and HULU broadcasts their shows (with commercials) on their websites (for free), why can't iTunes?
  • Reply 58 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post


    personally, i think it's crazy that iTunes doesn't allow you to rip your own movies. This should have happened when they first released the Apple TV for sale, and is probably why the sales aren't through the roof right now. Yes, i know you can rip movies other ways, but i'm married to iTunes and not inclined to spend hours to do something that should already be available on iTunes.



    my other beef with the iTunes store is that you can't instant watch TV for free (at least the shows that are on free broadcasting networks, and that you can already watch on HULU with commercials). You can't even RENT a TV show! That's a good way for people not to come back to the iTunes store. I have no problems with HBO/Skinomax/Showtime TV shows with a "BUY" or god-forbid "RENT" button. But if NBC and HULU broadcasts their shows (with commercials) on their websites (for free), why can't iTunes?



    This isn?t iTunes fault. Apple oddly announced the AppleTV 6 months before they did a proper demo of the device. It was far from ready and people speculate that they did it to show the MPAA that Apple was serious about pushing their content to the TV and had a secure way to it. Apparently the MPAA didn?t bite because movies still didn?t show up on the iTune Store for at least another year later. Put the blame on the people that are trying to prevent us from doing it. Hopefully Apple has shown them that customers can rip it for free with no DRM with other apps so having iTunes do it while adding FairPlay to the file is the best way to protect their content.
  • Reply 59 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    A really good way to grow their digital video download service is to sell more AppleTVs so people can watch the movies on their TV. To sell more AppleTVs they need to make it a more attractive option to justify the upfront hardware cost. They do that by making it capable of playing the DVDs you already own.



    Blu-ray players and HD DVRs are pretty powerful machines and many of them have internet and home networking features. While the ones I?ve seen aren?t very slick and surely don?t connect to iTunes, I wonder if Apple might make go that route. It?s fraught with issues, like Blu-ray and DVRs competing with Apple?s digital download service. On top of that, the content holders may not like Apple being able to record TV shows and might have that in a contract. They might be able to license the AppleTV OS, but I doubt they would do that.



    Quote:

    The iPod might have very well been a failure if you couldn't rip your CDs to play the music you already owned. It was only once there was a critical mass of iPod before iTunes music sales really took off. I think Apple has been short-sighted with the AppleTV by going straight for the forced iTunes sales for content rather than trying to first build a critical mass of hardware like they did with the iPod.



    CDs are a different beast, the iTunes Store was created then and iTunes was only for Macs at the time. It would be great, no one denies that, but the RIAA and the MPAA are completely different animals. The AppleTV isn?t great, but no media extender is. There was just too much flux in the where the technologies could go to make it a great product. Now things are much more set it place. Now it?s time for Apple to strike with a good product which makes me think that AppleTV Take3 with new hardware will hit in September.



    I disagree with you about needing a bunch of different AppleTVs without content before including the iTunes Store. That is just a more expensive and convoluted situation with no way to win for Apple or the consumer. The first problem the AppleTV had was the lack of content. Now the content is finally there, and it was a slow hard battle for Apple according to all reports.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    there is a long list of $20 - $30 apps on the internet that will rip any protected DVD, bypass the DRM and make the file iphone compatible in one step. buying music on the internet is one thing, people prefer DVD's to ITunes because DVD players are cheap. you can already get cheap blu-ray players for less than $200



    There are good free apps, too.
  • Reply 60 of 67
    antkm1antkm1 Posts: 1,441member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post


    This isn?t iTunes fault. Apple oddly announced the AppleTV 6 months before they did a proper demo of the device. It was far from ready and people speculate that they did it to show the MPAA that Apple was serious about pushing their content to the TV and had a secure way to it. Apparently the MPAA didn?t bite because movies still didn?t show up on the iTune Store for at least another year later. Put the blame on the people that are trying to prevent us from doing it. Hopefully Apple has shown them that customers can rip it for free with no DRM with other apps so having iTunes do it while adding FairPlay to the file is the best way to protect their content.



    yeah, i was never blaming Apple. I just think it's an insane, crazy, ridiculous deal we have right now.
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