Apple releases MobileMe Gallery software on iPhone App Store

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple released its fifth first-party App Store application Thursday with the free MobileMe Gallery, allowing users to view photos and videos from the cloud-based service on their iPhone or iPod touch.



The MobileMe Gallery app (iTunes link) lets users select an album with a tap and flick back and forth through photos, pinch to zoom, or rotate into landscape view. The software also automatically stores photos that have been viewed, so they can be accessed again even without a network connection.



Friens' publicly shared content can also be accessed by choosing their name from contacts or entering their MobileMe member name. It also includes a scrolling sampler at the top that gives users access to recent photos.



Users must enter their MobileMe member name and password to see their list of published movies and photos. A MobileMe subscription is required.



The free, 0.7MB application requires iPhone OS version 3.1 or later. Features of the software, according to Apple, include:



View your entire gallery including password protected and hidden albums

Flick through photos and pinch to zoom in for more detail

Rotate iPhone to see photos in landscape

View your friends' gallery photos and movies

Access previously viewed photos when offline

Easily share a link to an album from iPhone







Prior to MobileMe Gallery, Apple released only four total applications on its App Store. Another, MobileMe iDisk, is also centered around the company's MobileMe service. It allows users to access their iDisk anywhere from their iPhone and view popular file types like Microsoft Office and iWork '09 documents and presentations, as well as PDFs.



The other Apple-created applications are Remote, Keynote Remote, and Texas Hold'em. They are in addition to the native applications that come built-in to the iPhone and iPod touch.



With iPhone OS 3.0, MobileMe users were given the "Find My iPhone feature, which can be used to remotely pinpoint a lost or stolen phone. MobileMe is the successor to Apple's .Mac. The service debuted in 2008.



«1345

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 89
    Very nice! About time, too.
  • Reply 2 of 89
    Quote:

    Apple releases MobileMe Gallery software on iPhone App Store





    And it begins...





    I don't like my stuff being on the "cloud", especially in a unencrypted format.



    Isn't Google finally realizing the mistakes they made?





    Just because you have nothing to hide shouldn't mean you give up your right to privacy.
  • Reply 3 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    And it begins...





    I don't like my stuff being on the "cloud", especially in a unencrypted format.



    Isn't Google finally realizing the mistakes they made?





    Just because you have nothing to hide shouldn't mean you give up your right to privacy.



    What the hell are you on about again?



    It's like Flickr.
  • Reply 4 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    What the hell are you on about again?



    It's like Flickr.





    Would you put your private photo's of your 16 year old daughter sunning on the beach in Hawaii while in her bikini on Flickr? Possibly to be photoshoped into cp and circulated on the internet?



    I don't think you would.





    So what's protecting those photo's on MobileMe? From being hacked?



    Nothing, and that's my point.





    Encryption of the files should at least be optional. But as always Apple, like Google, throws your privacy right out the window.



    They operate from a position that "nothing can go wrong" when instead they should be operating from "lets make things as secure as possible so nothing does go wrong"



    If it wasn't for Unix under OS X, it would have been pawned long ago.
  • Reply 5 of 89
    warpwarp Posts: 17member
    Just downloaded this app. It was a bit difficult to use my Gallery from the iPhone prior to this. From my 3GS I could upload photos and videos to it, but it wasn't easy to view them or share a link to them from the iPhone. Thanks, Apple!



    BTW, I wonder if the iDisk and Gallery app functionality could be consolidated into a single app? Why have two slots consumed to use the same cloud service? Just a thought.
  • Reply 6 of 89
    feynmanfeynman Posts: 1,087member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    View your entire gallery including password protected and hidden albums







    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Would you put your private photo's of your 16 year old daughter sunning on the beach in Hawaii while in her bikini on Flickr?



    I don't think you would.





    So what's protecting those photo's on MobileMe?



    Nothing, and that's my point.





    Encryption of the files should at least be optional. But as always Apple, like Google, throws your privacy right out the window.



    I imagine this means, if you have public photos then there is no encryption, if they are password protected, you will have to enter the password.



    If your 16 year old daughter is vacationing at the beach in her bikini, I imagine you would have those password protected so they would be private. How much more secure do you want?
  • Reply 7 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by warp View Post




    BTW, I wonder if the iDisk and Gallery app functionality could be consolidated into a single app? Why have two slots consumed to use the same cloud service? Just a thought.



    my thoughts exactly.
  • Reply 8 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Would you put your private photo's of your 16 year old daughter sunning on the beach in Hawaii while in her bikini on Flickr?



    I don't think you would.





    So what's protecting those photo's on MobileMe?



    Nothing, and that's my point.





    Encryption of the files should at least be optional. But as always Apple, like Google, throws your privacy right out the window.



    What are talking about? Then don't put private photos up on Webshots, flickr, Photobucket, etc., for the world to see. No one is talking about protecting private content that you shouldn't have put up anywhere in the first place.



    View your entire gallery including password protected and hidden albums



    Does that answer your question??



    Why are your "arguments" always all over the place?
  • Reply 9 of 89
    akacakac Posts: 510member
    Don't put pictures on the net you don't want others to see. Its that simple. But for those that you do - what's the problem? Be responsible.
  • Reply 10 of 89
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    Apple also regrets not buying Flickr. Seriously, Apple is sitting on billions. Buy Twitter now or regret it forever.
  • Reply 11 of 89
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Feynman View Post


    I imagine this means, if you have public photos then there is no encryption, if they are password protected, you will have to enter the password.



    If your 16 year old daughter is vacationing at the beach in her bikini, I imagine you would have those password protected so they would be private. How much more secure do you want?





    Password protected is not encrypted.



    Two different things my friend.





    Password protected means the files themselves are not accessible without the password, but that's trivial to bypass if your hacked into the system hosting the pictures.



    Encrypted means the files themselves are scrambled and can only be unscrambled with the password on the device itself, using the processor on the device.



    What that does is if someone who wants to see your private pictures has to hack your device, when you got it turned on and within range of wifi or cell, AND break the encryption or wait till you do.



    This is much harder to do and less of a reward, than hacking the entire MobileMe system with a simple password protection and getting ALL the pictures from everyone. Like it already has occurred for other "cloud" based systems and even Facebook.
  • Reply 12 of 89
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    What are talking about? Then don't put private photos up on Webshots, flickr, Photobucket, etc., for the world to see. No one is talking about protecting private content that you shouldn't have put up anywhere in the first place.





    The difference between online hosting (Webshots, flickr, Photobucket etc.), is that it's not a private device like the iPhone is. People knowing upload their pictures to a public site.



    The iPhone and MobileMe integration gives the impression it's a private device, when it's not.



    People will take private photo's of themselves with the iPhone, store them in the "cloud" on MobileMe thinking it's private with a password protected, but not encrypted, like a option it should have.
  • Reply 13 of 89
    I'd use my MobileMe Gallery for my pictures and videos and love every minute of it, if Apple would only give us more, preferably unlimited, space.



    Instead, they cripple the photo/video-sharing arm of the MobileMe service with an antiquated 20GB limit.



    20GB is fine if you just bought your first digital camera. For about a week. But otherwise, it moots MobileMe as a Flickr alternative.



    Too bad too, given how slick the MobileMe Gallery otherwise is, and this new little slice of app-loveliness.



    Oh well.
  • Reply 14 of 89
    If your 16 year old daughter was sunning in a bikini on a beach in Hawaii, lots of people have already seen her in the bikini. What's the difference between that public appearance and the risk of someone seeing it posted on the net?



    Heck, if she's like most teens and tween, she's already had someone snap a picture of her in it, then SMS it to all her friends, who forwarded it to the rest of the school.



    She's probably also posted it on Facebook in her public profile that has 1000+ "friends" she's never really met.



    It's probably on her MySpace page as well.



    Not to mention some pervert with a telephoto or hidden camera up close has already snapped a few dozen pictures of her and posted them someplace as well.



    Bottom line, if you don't want your 16 year old daughter to be seen by the rest of the world laying on a beach in Hawaii in her bikini, then you probably shouldn't let her out in a bikini on that beach.







    edit: disclaimer - meant to be totally tongue in cheek
  • Reply 15 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    And it begins...





    I don't like my stuff being on the "cloud", especially in a unencrypted format.



    Isn't Google finally realizing the mistakes they made?





    Just because you have nothing to hide shouldn't mean you give up your right to privacy.



    951 posts and most of them are dumping on something or someone.



    What a piece of work!
  • Reply 16 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mactripper View Post


    would you put your private photo's of your 16 year old daughter sunning on the beach in hawaii while in her bikini on flickr? Possibly to be photoshoped into cp and circulated on the internet?



    I don't think you would.





    So what's protecting those photo's on mobileme? From being hacked?



    Nothing, and that's my point.





    Encryption of the files should at least be optional. But as always apple, like google, throws your privacy right out the window.



    They operate from a position that "nothing can go wrong" when instead they should be operating from "lets make things as secure as possible so nothing does go wrong"



    if it wasn't for unix under os x, it would have been pawned long ago.



    for cryin' out loud, quit complaining about everything under the sun!!!
  • Reply 17 of 89
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Akac View Post


    Don't put pictures on the net you don't want others to see. Its that simple. But for those that you do - what's the problem? Be responsible.





    So your supposed to deny yourself the joy of private personal photo's on your mobile device just because Apple refuses to implement a encryption option?



    Come on!



    Have you ever gotten sh*tfaced drunk, took some embarrassing or misinterpreted pictures you later regret?



    Wouldn't it be nice to know that nobody at Apple, or hackers, or the cops could see those pictures?



    With a auto-encryption option turned on, all pictures uploaded to MobileMe would be encrypted.



    People are people, one size doesn't fit all.
  • Reply 18 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thismarty View Post


    I'd use my MobileMe Gallery for my pictures and videos and love every minute of it, if Apple would only give us more, preferably unlimited, space.



    Instead, they cripple the photo/video-sharing arm of the MobileMe service with an antiquated 20GB limit.



    20GB is fine if you just bought your first digital camera. For about a week. But otherwise, it moots MobileMe as a Flickr alternative.



    Too bad too, given how slick the MobileMe Gallery otherwise is, and this new little slice of app-loveliness.



    Oh well.



    This is no different than any other tedious complaint about MobileMe not being free. You can add more than 20GB if you pay for it. Like it or lump it.
  • Reply 19 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post


    This is no different than any other tedious complaint about MobileMe not being free. You can add more than 20GB if you pay for it. Like it or lump it.



    Clearly, I've chosen to lump it.



    But, this being a forum, I've added a little grumble about how I could like it.



    Thanks tons for putting up with all of us.
  • Reply 20 of 89
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post


    If your 16 year old daughter was sunning in a bikini on a beach in Hawaii, lots of people have already seen her in the bikini. What's the difference between that public appearance and the risk of someone seeing it posted on the net?



    Heck, if she's like most teens and tween, she's already had someone snap a picture of her in it, then SMS it to all her friends, who forwarded it to the rest of the school.



    She's probably also posted it on Facebook in her public profile that has 1000+ "friends" she's never really met.



    It's probably on her MySpace page as well.



    Not to mention some pervert with a telephoto or hidden camera up close has already snapped a few dozen pictures of her and posted them someplace as well.



    Bottom line, if you don't want your 16 year old daughter to be seen by the rest of the world laying on a beach in Hawaii in her bikini, then you probably shouldn't let her out in a bikini on that beach.







    edit: disclaimer - meant to be totally tongue in cheek









    Right, but at the beach either I or others are around to keep the perverts at bay. A guy with a camera taking pictures is going to raise suspicions and possibly break stalking laws (of children) depending which state or country it is.



    Now without encryption on MobileMe as a option, any pictures (even password protected) are nearly public domain and can be altered into illegal pictures.



    That's just one example of concern people have and why a encryption option should be available.
Sign In or Register to comment.