Steve Jobs: iPad to offer Word support, $10 eBooks, 6 days of music

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Apple co-founder Steve Jobs revealed after Wednesday's iPad unveiling that the device will offer "the same" prices on e-books as Amazon's Kindle, the Pages app can export documents in Microsoft Word format, and it will offer nearly 6 days of continuous music playback.



The conversation between Walt Mossberg, of The Wall Street Journal, and Jobs was captured on video by BoomTown's Kara Swisher. Mossberg asked Jobs why customers would want to purchase books for the iPad, when they were rumored to cost between $13 and $15 while Amazon charges $9.99. Jobs responded by saying, "the prices will be the same."



"Publishers are actually withholding their books from Amazon, because they're not happy with it," Jobs added. The comment carried a different tone from his keynote, when Jobs complimented Amazon for pioneering the e-book market with the Kindle.



Mossberg also asked Jobs if he should write his review of the iPad in the Pages application, which will cost $9.99 in the App Store. The journalist said he would need to save it as a Microsoft Word document, though, because his editors "don't know anything about Pages."



Jobs told Mossberg that the mobile version of Pages would allow him to save the file as a Microsoft Word document.



"Write it in Pages, you could make a Word version and send it to your editors," Jobs said.



Mossberg also inquired about battery life on the iPad, and Jobs revealed the device will offer "140-something hours" of continuous music playback with the screen off, or nearly six days.



"It's all about the display," the Apple co-founder said of battery life. "Our chips don't use hardly any power."



As for the device's uptime when reading e-books, Jobs said he believes the 10 hours provided will be more than enough for most users. He discredited Mossberg's suggestion that a backlit LCD display, versus the e-ink on the Amazon Kindle, produces a "battery cost."



"You know, there isn't," Jobs said. "Because you just end up plugging it in. You end up docking it or whatever you're going to do with it. It's not a big deal. Ten hours is a long time. Because you're not going to read for 10 hours."







The iPad has a 9.7-inch LCD display that features IPS technology. The Hitachi-developed feature allows improved viewing angles and superior color reproductions on screens.



Later in the video, Mossberg also revealed that Jobs personally told him that the iPad would carry a price under $1,000. The statement suggests that the Apple CEO confirmed the existence of the device to Mossberg before it was formally announced Wednesday.



While the Journal reporter had assumed that the device would cost $999, Apple revealed Wednesday that the starting price of the iPad will be $499, with the most expensive model costing $829.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 159
    Good. I completely agree that compatibility with Word is necessary. Although this may not be direct indication of it, it still goes toward catering toward the business crowd. It has to if the iPad is to be success in the long run. I agree with the following artilce's message concerning the need to shape the iPad into a business machine (or at least make it more attractive to business customers):
  • Reply 2 of 159
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    This thing is beginning to sound more and more interesting.
  • Reply 3 of 159
    I would buy iPad if there was a Microsoft Word app. Though others may disagree, i am very tempted to fulfill the role of Desktop computer with iPad. My current Dell from 2003 belongs in a Housing Works or Salvation Army.
  • Reply 4 of 159
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    6 days of music? I'd say this is a slight bump from the 24 hour iPhone/music battery ability.
  • Reply 5 of 159
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Jobs wasn't implying that Apple's eBooks would be $10, he was implying that the Kindle eBooks were going to go up in price.
  • Reply 6 of 159
    They learned lessons all right from what Bergermeister's poll showed them.

    P.S. BTW, I can hardly imagine an editor who would agree to receive MS Word document.

    P.P.S. I'd be hugely obliged to Steve, if he explained to that ummm... interviewer how to physically export created documents (DOC, PDF, "whatever") from iPad...
  • Reply 7 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BRussell View Post


    Jobs wasn't implying that Apple's eBooks would be $10, he was implying that the Kindle eBooks were going to go up in price.



    Absolutely correct.
  • Reply 8 of 159
    It is it me (probably) or is the discussion about the iWork software getting short-shrift? I was absolutely amazed at the interface of these programs, particularly Keynote. How natural is it to have once taken a legal pad or other pad of paper and start "storyboarding" a presentation that you later had to write up on a computer? The potential is amazing and very impressive for what was demoed.



    At the expense of sounding ideological, can your netbook do that? In that manner? Isn't that what we're really looking at here? You can never satisfy everyone, but the implications that you're creating something that you later polish on a desktop (or even laptop on your desk) seems far beyond the accepted practice that a tablet computer *must* have a full-fledged desktop OS, replete with menu bars and other such stuff.
  • Reply 9 of 159
    This surprises anyone? Pages users already know that it saves as Word documents. It always has.
  • Reply 10 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    This thing is beginning to sound more and more interesting.



    "?beginning to??"



    Sent you private message.
  • Reply 11 of 159
    "The journalist said he would need to save it as a Microsoft Word document, though, because his editors "don't know anything about Pages.""



    Why does the pages file format even exist? Why couldn't Apple (who supposedly love open standards) have used ODF? Or at least have made pages a simple wrapper for ODF. You can't even export in ODF. Almost no one uses Pages and it's not compatible with any other program.
  • Reply 12 of 159
    galleygalley Posts: 971member
    Didn't Steve state that the 10-hour battery life was with Wi-Fi on? If so, then that's pretty good. I fully expected the iPod add to run for considerably longer.
  • Reply 13 of 159
    "Our chips don't use hardly any power."



    Means it uses a lot of power.



    Stevo needs to improve his english.
  • Reply 14 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freethinker View Post


    I would buy iPad if there was a Microsoft Word app. Though others may disagree, i am very tempted to fulfill the role of Desktop computer with iPad. My current Dell from 2003 belongs in a Housing Works or Salvation Army.





    Or you could get pages for 10 bucks and use that to create word docs
  • Reply 15 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Traqqer7777 View Post


    Good. I completely agree that compatibility with Word is necessary. Although this may not be direct indication of it, it still goes toward catering toward the business crowd. It has to if the iPad is to be success in the long run. I agree with the following artilce's message concerning the need to shape the iPad into a business machine (or at least make it more attractive to business customers):



    I thought iPhones already can handle Word and Excel?

    Anyway, Excel will be next no doubt.
  • Reply 16 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freethinker View Post


    I would buy iPad if there was a Microsoft Word app. Though others may disagree, i am very tempted to fulfill the role of Desktop computer with iPad. My current Dell from 2003 belongs in a Housing Works or Salvation Army.



    As an accountant and I am sure for millions of other business people- no Excel app - 100%, NO deal.
  • Reply 17 of 159
    Sorry Steve, I have over 25 days of continuous music, which would leave me little room for anything else on the iPad "thing".



    Then I have to pay for iWork, when I already have OpenOffice.





    So we see what's going on, your locking the machine down so you can sell your programs.



    Will you allow a version of the free Open Office to appear on the App Store?
  • Reply 18 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post


    I thought iPhones already can handle Word and Excel?

    Anyway, Excel will be next no doubt.



    Numbers files can import XLS files, and can also be saved/exported as such (as Keynote can PPT). I imagine these would be obvious functionalities.
  • Reply 19 of 159
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Will you allow a version of the free Open Office to appear on the App Store?



    Is there any evidence that it has been blocked by the App Store? Or is it that they've not written an App yet?
  • Reply 20 of 159
    You didn't know iWork exports Word Excel and PowerPoint?



    Really?
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