Startup developers represent one in five on Apple's App Store

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Despite the fact that it will be two years old this summer and now has more than 150,000 applications, Apple's App Store for the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad remains a place where startups and independent software creators have a fair shot at success.



An estimated one in five iPhone developers are companies founded specifically to create applications for the iPhone, according to the latest Flurry Smartphone Industry Pulse survey. That represents the second-largest category of developers behind only preexisting online companies, including giants like Google, Facebook and eBay. Those established brands take up 22 percent of the iPhone developer share.



"This means that the barrier to entry is still low enough for start-ups to enter and innovation to flourish," Flurry noted. "However, those days may be numbered as 'discoverability' has become a significant issue, and now 'marketing muscle' is starting to count more in the App Store."



Now that the iPhone has reached "critical mass" with 70 million iPhone and iPod touch units worldwide, the analytics firm predicted that 2010 will become the year that major brands begin to take over the App Store. This will be further driven by the introduction of the iPad, due to launch on April 3, which has generated interest among traditional media companies in the forms of newspapers, books and magazines.



The third-largest segment of developers, traditional gaming companies like EA and Activision, represent 19 percent of the total developer pie. But those developers also far exceed their presence, garnering 36 percent of the total revenue generation. Native iPhone developers come in second with 21 percent share, while online brands take 14 percent, tied with traditional media.



"Given the specialized skill-set required to build a compelling game, it's no surprise that traditional game companies lead this category, including companies such as Electronic Arts and Activision," the report noted.







Last month, Flurry reported that App Store developer interest had nearly tripled following the unveiling of the iPad. The trend has continued in the latest report, with a "significant increase" in new application starts maintained through the month of February.



Apple has pitched the launch of the iPad as a "whole new gold rush" for developers, as the device and its 9.7-inch screen will run existing App Store software as well as new applications designed specifically for the hardware and its larger touchscreen. First released in January, the iPhone 3.2 beta software development kit allows developers to create iPad-specific software.







The App Store has proven successful for a variety of companies, from upstart developers such as Tapulous, which earns nearly $1 million per month, to established companies like personal navigation provider TomTom, which recorded more than 100,000 sales of its GPS application for the iPhone. In January, Apple revealed that App Store downloads had topped 3 billion less than 18 months after it first opened.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    There' still too much garbage to sort through...
  • Reply 2 of 27
    hittrj01hittrj01 Posts: 753member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    There' still too much garbage to sort through...



    All that means is that the iPhone is the dominant platform in its respective field. Every dominant platform has plenty (too much) shovelware to sort through. Windows, Wii, PlayStation 2 back in the day, etc. There are some real gems, but not all of the 150,000 can possibly be expected to be of high quality. It's our responsibility as the customer to show these developers what we consider worth our money.
  • Reply 3 of 27
    finetunesfinetunes Posts: 2,065member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    There' still too much garbage to sort through...



    Like all else, the bad ones will die and the good ones will prosper. Just have to keep up on review and wom.
  • Reply 4 of 27
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    There' still too much garbage to sort through...



    And what would you suggest to eliminate the garbage?



    And while you are at it, how would you get rid of all the millions of garbage applications for Windows, Macs, Linux, etc.



    Better yet, how would you tell us if they were garbage?
  • Reply 5 of 27
    Wow, the first few replies quoted me. That has to be a personal record for me. I know there is always garbage on all platforms, desktop or mobile, and it's hard to sort through it all. There is no perfect way to filter them out. I know I never look past the top 25 or so in any catagory I browse. I feel if it isn't top 25, it can't be that good for my purposes. I think my issue lies with small developers or those who program by themselves. It's hard for them to compete against bigger, more established companies. The review system also needs a revamping because people sometimes use it as a suggestion box instead of reviewing the substance.
  • Reply 6 of 27
    woohoo!woohoo! Posts: 291member
    The problem with the App Store is this:





    There is only 20 apps with just icons and a names on a page in iTunes. It takes 10-15 seconds to load each page. The name alone doesn't describe the apps at all.



    No descriptions on the main page, meaning one has to click on a app to see more and this takes another 10-15 seconds. There are hardly any reviews.



    To go back to the previous page requires another 10-15 seconds to start the whole process over gain.



    I calculated it would take over 3-1/2 hours to review all the apps in just the education category alone!





    The App Store needs the spreadsheet style layout of iTunes combined with the short description nature of each app next to the name like one gets at VersionTracker or MacUpdate. This way one can just scroll through a list of a hundreds or all the apps available in a category with reviews, rating or whatever all on the same line. Saves considerable amount of time reviewing.



    Leave the icon for the last page where the download occurs, it's not needed elsewhere and just sucks bandwidth being displayed earlier.



    People don't buy based upon the icon first, that's how it's set up now and it's stupid.





    Also there isn't a way at Apple's website to review and search for all the App Store apps there neither.



    BUT one can with Dashboard widgets? WTF?





    Apple needs to create a better layout to review apps not only in iTunes, but on the web as well.



    The way it is now is likely responsible for the dismal per unit sales on the App Store. I say dismal because people buy hundreds of dollars worth of music and it has a list style layout, but the App Store doesn't. Strange.



    http://www.macpolls.com/?poll_id=577
  • Reply 7 of 27
    iluviluv Posts: 123member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Onhka View Post


    And what would you suggest to eliminate the garbage?




    Apple should invent a search engine. They could use it to search the App Store, and then they could use it to kill Goolgle!
  • Reply 8 of 27
    bartfatbartfat Posts: 432member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iLuv View Post


    Apple should invent a search engine. They could use it to search the App Store, and then they could use it to kill Goolgle!



    They already have a search engine for iTunes. But they decided not to use it to kill Google
  • Reply 9 of 27
    bstringbstring Posts: 104member
    "The people who create [Apple] apps serve at the landlord?s pleasure and fear his anger." http://bit.ly/aPuLmL



    "The big thing about the Web isn?t the technology, it?s that it?s the first-ever platform without a vendor. Apple apparently thinks you can have the benefits of the Internet while at the same time controlling what programs can be run and what parts of the stack can be accessed and what developers can say to each other."



    All mobile platforms have open access for startup developers. With Apple, they have many more potential customers and a corresponding number of competitors. The free apps created through sweat equity by thousands of startups bring Apple and its users great value. In return, the vast majority of developers see no revenue, ever. They do it for the love of it, apparently.
  • Reply 10 of 27
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post


    The problem with the App Store is this:

    [...]



    The problem with you is this:



    You've been shown many ways in many threads in which to find apps you want yet you still claim the only method is to use the iTS and go through each app one by one.



    Either you have a learning disability or you are simply trolling. Since I'd never call anyone a retard as that is offensive I'll have to assume you are a troll.
  • Reply 11 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Since I'd never call anyone a retard as that is offensive...





    To quote Michael Scott:



    You don't call retarded people retards. It's bad taste. You call your friends retards when they are acting retarded.
  • Reply 12 of 27
    sajsaj Posts: 19member
    My apps download also increased from January 2010..
  • Reply 13 of 27
    jupiteronejupiterone Posts: 1,564member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    There' still too much garbage to sort through...



    We hear this so many times in all threads about the App Store. I don't understand what people are doing. Are they going to the App Store thinking, "Hey, let's see what apps are in the App Store!".....and start going through, one by one checking things out? I agree that there is a lot of "garbage" out there, but why are you wading through it?



    When I go to the App Store it is either because 1) I'm looking for a specific solution so I type in keywords in the Search field or 2) I've heard of a really cool app and I type it's name in the Search field.



    Searching and categorization can always be improved, but I just don't understand why folks think that they have to look at each and every app to find something.
  • Reply 14 of 27
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post


    The App Store needs the spreadsheet style layout of iTunes combined with the short description nature of each app next to the name like one gets at VersionTracker or MacUpdate. This way one can just scroll through a list of a hundreds or all the apps available in a category with reviews, rating or whatever all on the same line. Saves considerable amount of time reviewing.



    You of all people would never be satisfied for anything that Apple comes up with.



    For those who are looking for sources besides a friend or colleague to help select new apps, I would suggest the following sites are available and worth perusing:Suggestions appreciated.



    Remember, it is not something that one person can make a decision on. Only you know what is good for you. After all you have been telling your parents that since the day you could talk.
  • Reply 15 of 27
    molochmoloch Posts: 46member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    There' still too much garbage to sort through...



    This worries me. I want to port my Windows Mobile app to the iPhone, but if nobody will even be able to find it in the deluge of 100 variants each of fifteen different baseball stats apps, then why should I even bother?
  • Reply 16 of 27
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Moloch View Post


    This worries me. I want to port my Windows Mobile app to the iPhone, but if nobody will even be able to find it in the deluge of 100 variants each of fifteen different baseball stats apps, then why should I even bother?



    For sure nobody will find it if you try to port you Windows Mobile app to the iPhone.



    More important, this is not the place to be asking that question. Do some homework. You'll do yourself a favor.
  • Reply 17 of 27
    woohoo!woohoo! Posts: 291member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Onhka View Post


    [*]VersionTracker iPhone http://www.versiontracker.com/iphone/[*]MacUpDate for iPhone http://m.macupdate.com/iphone.php

    [/LIST]





    Thanks, my eyes are not as good as they were.





    Quote:

    Suggestions appreciated.





    Be less of a troll when responding.
  • Reply 18 of 27
    An App I found on the App store that has helped me find apps is "PositionApp". It lists the apps that are moving up or down based on downloads by country. Its greatest strength is the Browse feature. You can browse by country to get started. From there you can select a category. It separates them by Free or Paid apps. From there, just scroll down to see the position of apps from 1 to whatever. It even lets you track the position of a favorite app.



    I would love to know where they get their information from. Its a great database. It took me a while to get use to the UI, but its worth the effort. Best of all, its free.
  • Reply 19 of 27
    woohoo!woohoo! Posts: 291member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post


    We hear this so many times in all threads about the App Store. I don't understand what people are doing. Are they going to the App Store thinking, "Hey, let's see what apps are in the App Store!".....and start going through, one by one checking things out?



    That's what they are doing because they hear about the App Store so they go check it out. People are complaining for a reason and I've become one of them.



    Quote:

    I agree that there is a lot of "garbage" out there, but why are you wading through it?



    When I go to the App Store it is either because 1) I'm looking for a specific solution so I type in keywords in the Search field or 2) I've heard of a really cool app and I type it's name in the Search field.



    Searching and categorization can always be improved, but I just don't understand why folks think that they have to look at each and every app to find something.





    Because people are looking for something useful, but don't have a specific need in mind. They are browsing the store. Like people do in knickknack shops filled with all sorts of things that appear to have no use, but people say "hey I can use that on this or that". Sometimes you get the customers who just walk right in and say "hey I want this, do you have it?" but most times people just browse and buy for other reasons. Perhaps they got a iPod Touch as a gift and now need to fill it up.



    For instance I scrolled through several thousand apps just now on VersionTracker and found a app called iBenge or something, supposed to save one money as they can look up a products symbol and see if they can get it cheaper on the internet or if it's just about the same price in the store.



    Now I didn't know this app existed or that I had a need for it, but immediately thought "hey I could use this on a mobile device!" So I added it to my list of apps to get.



    So you see, people want to be exposed to all the apps and make a decision which ones they could really use, and perhaps like me, before they buy a iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch.



    Now the problem of course is like I stated above in my earlier post, that the App Store is slow to navigate and review apps in great quantity. VersionTracker or MacUpdate is much better suited UI for the task, but the App Store is where everyone goes first and meets it's slow icon based interface and get annoyed, thus they complain.



    After reviewing a few thousand apps on VersionTracker, I can say a lot of them have little practical use. Some just duplicate the functionality of websites in paid app. I got a computer for that.



    But I want to look, there is over 150,000 apps and there's got to be gems in there someplace.
  • Reply 20 of 27
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,558member
    At some point there has to be an improvement in locating apps. I'd like to see the tagging of apps a "split the difference" proposition, where 1/2 or more of the weight of the search takes into account users tag descriptions for apps.
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