Apple acquires iPad trademark from Fujitsu

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple obtained the "entire interest" in the iPad trademark from Fujitsu last week, according to a filing published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.



As reported by Patent Authority, Fujitsu Frontech North America Inc. assigned Apple the rights to the iPad trademark on March 17.



Fujitsu originally began using the iPad trademark in 2003 for its Windows CE-based handheld devices aimed at mobile Point Of Sale in retail (pictured below), a couple years after Apple introduced the iPod. The company was assigned the iPad trademark for a "hand-held computing device for wireless networking in a retail environment."







A USPTO examining attorney later refused Fujitsu's registration of the trademark in 2004 on the basis that the name was merely descriptive of the device. The company successfully contested the refusal.



Last spring, the USPTO notified Fujitsu that its iPad trademark application was "abandoned in full" because it failed to respond to a 2008 request within six months. Fujitsu then refiled the trademark application and it was "revived to pending status" last summer.



In September, Apple initiated proceedings challenging the validity of Fujitsu's trademark. The issue was repeatedly extended in October and December filings as the two companies deliberated the trademark rights.



The final resolution granted Apple the trademark just a few weeks before the iPad is scheduled to go on sale. It is not detailed in USPTO filings whether (or how much) Apple paid for the trademark assignment.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 42
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    Just one MORE reason that Steve really needs to start dropping the 'i' from new products... Sure it can clearly be argued that its almost a 'brand' on its very own however everyone and their brother has used AND abused it TO DEATH and then back and then TO DEATH again.



    So.. Apple... either start trademarking anything and everything you could possible imagine wanting a (tm) for in the next 10 or 20 years or move on already.. Things DO get stale after a while. \
  • Reply 2 of 42
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    Problem solved.
  • Reply 3 of 42
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post


    Just one MORE reason that Steve really needs to start dropping the 'i' from new products... Sure it can clearly be argued that its almost a 'brand' on its very own however everyone and their brother has used AND abused it TO DEATH and then back and then TO DEATH again.



    So.. Apple... either start trademarking anything and everything you could possible imagine wanting a (tm) for in the next 10 or 20 years or move on already.. Things DO get stale after a while. \



    Agreed. Apple has to stop wasting money on these kinds of things.
  • Reply 4 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dave K. View Post


    Agreed. Apple has to stop wasting money on these kinds of things.



    You're right. Steve obviously has no idea what he's doing and it shows in Apple's quarterly reports and in the stock price.
  • Reply 5 of 42
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post


    Things DO get stale after a while. \



    Numbers, please.



    Every shred of material evidence points to the continued (and growing) effectiveness of Apple's "i" naming scheme.
  • Reply 6 of 42
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,738member
    Is Fujitsu still marketing the iPad POS device?
  • Reply 7 of 42
    diracdirac Posts: 4member
    The statement "Apple acquires iPad trademark from Fujitsu" cannot be supported form the article's account the way I read it. We don't know exactly how Apple came to be granted it, or whether Fujitsu was paid.



    A bit more accuracy would be nice, otherwise thanks for the reports.
  • Reply 8 of 42
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    The success or failure of any trademarked name is reflected in the success of the product bearing that name, often reflected in sales.



    A far as the iPad goes, the signs are more than encouraging. The "pad" jokes are by this time old, and most of the industry has moved on to what the product itself represents (save for a few juvenile members on Apple forums), which is something quite impressive, to say the least. Sales are rightly expected to follow suit.
  • Reply 9 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    The success or failure of any trademarked name is reflected in the success of the product bearing that name, often reflected in sales.



    A far as the iPad goes, the signs are more than encouraging. The "pad" jokes are by this time old, and most of the industry has moved on to what the product itself represents (save for a few juvenile members on Apple forums), which is something quite impressive, to say the least. Sales are rightly expected to follow suit.



    What he said.
  • Reply 10 of 42
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Numbers, please.



    Every shred of material evidence points to the continued (and growing) effectiveness of Apple's "i" naming scheme.



    Don't you mean "circumstantial"? I doubt there is material evidence on this matter. And yes, I consider the popularity of the products in question to be circumstantial to the case because it does not eliminate numerous other reasons that the product may be popular, it's difficult or maybe even impossible to narrow that down.
  • Reply 11 of 42
    elrothelroth Posts: 1,201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Don't you mean "circumstantial"? I doubt there is material evidence on this matter. And yes, I consider the popularity of the products in question to be circumstantial to the case because it does not eliminate numerous other reasons that the product may be popular, it's difficult or maybe even impossible to narrow that down.



    Would you agree that it has not been shown that people (other than you) are tired of the i names? It's pretty likely that the i names are a boon to sales - easy to say, easy to remember, simple and short. Marketing 101.



    I guarantee you Apple has researched it, and they know what they're doing. Do you think they just pulled the "iPad" name out of a hat? You'll notice they did not go for the name iTouch - they used iPod Touch instead. They also did not continue the "iBook" name - they went to MacBook. They know what they're doing
  • Reply 12 of 42
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elroth View Post


    Would you agree that it has not been shown that people (other than you) are tired of the i names? It's pretty likely that the i names are a boon to sales - easy to say, easy to remember, simple and short. Marketing 101.



    I guarantee you Apple has researched it, and they know what they're doing. Do you think they just pulled the "iPad" name out of a hat? You'll notice they did not go for the name iTouch - they used iPod Touch instead. They also did not continue the "iBook" name - they went to MacBook. They know what they're doing



    I don't think it's just me, note that I'm not the one that brought it up in this thread. I would agree that the benefits probably outweigh the negatives, at least for now. But as for material evidence? I doubt that exists for either way.
  • Reply 13 of 42
    kibitzerkibitzer Posts: 1,113member
    This is really about branding. A naming convention can earn instant perception among consumers across a family of products that have proven themselves successful. The common name format helps to overcome awareness barriers to the introduction of any new product. Consumers - almost without conscious thought - identify what category it occupies (electronics, food, etc.), who makes it, and where it can be purchased, while accepting that it will fit within the envelope of established expectations for other brands within the family. For leading consumer businesses, brand extensions through naming conventions can offer a powerful marketing advantage over competitors.



    iMac

    iPod

    iTunes

    iPad

    iBooks



    Big Mac

    McNuggets

    McCafe

    McMuffin

    McDouble

    McGriddle

    McSkillet

    McChicken

    McRib
  • Reply 14 of 42
    The Fujitsu's iPad is very very bad! Better Apple's one!
  • Reply 15 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post


    Just one MORE reason that Steve really needs to start dropping the 'i' from new products... Sure it can clearly be argued that its almost a 'brand' on its very own however everyone and their brother has used AND abused it TO DEATH and then back and then TO DEATH again.



    So.. Apple... either start trademarking anything and everything you could possible imagine wanting a (tm) for in the next 10 or 20 years or move on already.. Things DO get stale after a while. \



    Ha ha ha - Is that like a fate worse than a fate worse than death?
  • Reply 16 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post


    This is really about branding. A naming convention can earn instant perception among consumers across a family of products that have proven themselves successful. The common name format helps to overcome awareness barriers to the introduction of any new product. Consumers - almost without conscious thought - identify what category it occupies (electronics, food, etc.), who makes it, and where it can be purchased, while accepting that it will fit within the envelope of established expectations for other brands within the family. For leading consumer businesses, brand extensions through naming conventions can offer a powerful marketing advantage over competitors.



    iMac

    iPod

    iTunes

    iPad

    iBooks



    Big Mac

    McNuggets

    McCafe

    McMuffin

    McDouble

    McGriddle

    McSkillet

    McChicken

    McRib



    You missed McSh*t - that's the only thing I use them for!
  • Reply 17 of 42
    adamwadamw Posts: 114guest
    Apple seems to have done the right thing here. Even if it cost tens of millions of dollars, the iPad product name should bring in a large sum of money for Apple. By buying this already approved and published trademark for IPAD, they can use it as leverage to get the USPTO to expand and approve the iPad mark in Apple's pending iPad trademark applications in other classifications to cover a wider number of trademark uses. They can also go after the other, newer pending iPad marks by other people and get them invalidated due to this prior trademark they bought.
  • Reply 18 of 42
    msnlymsnly Posts: 378member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by adamw View Post


    Apple seems to have done the right thing here. Even if it cost tens of millions of dollars, the iPad product name should bring in a large sum of money for Apple. By buying this already approved and published trademark for IPAD, they can use it as leverage to get the USPTO to expand and approve the iPad mark in Apple's pending iPad trademark applications in other classifications to cover a wider number of trademark uses. They can also go after the other, newer pending iPad marks by other people and get them invalidated due to this prior trademark they bought.



    I don't believe they bought it.
  • Reply 19 of 42
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    The success or failure of any trademarked name is reflected in the success of the product bearing that name, often reflected in sales.



    A far as the iPad goes, the signs are more than encouraging. The "pad" jokes are by this time old, and most of the industry has moved on to what the product itself represents (save for a few juvenile members on Apple forums), which is something quite impressive, to say the least. Sales are rightly expected to follow suit.



    I keep reminding these same people they've been using a different kind of "pad" (pictured below) for years already so the joke isn't that clever.



  • Reply 20 of 42
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by STecchino View Post


    I keep reminding these same people they've been using a different kind of "pad" (pictured below) for years already so the joke isn't that clever.







    So true!



    I've always liked the ThinkPad name.



    In ThinkPad, however, there's the "Think" at the beginning of the name, which makes the rest sound like a single word, or else it takes away a bit of the emphasis from "Pad."



    What might have been funny at first was that Apple was essentially calling it just a "Pad" by using the iPad name.



    Regardless, it would appear (at least now) that Apple made the right decision by choosing "IPad." It's another addition to the successful "i"-naming lineup. Of course, this all assumes the iPad will be a success.
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