AT&T reveals high-speed HSPA+ will reach 250M Americans in 2010

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
AT&T this week announced that its high-speed HSPA+ data network upgrade will bring theoretical maximum 14.4Mbps download speeds to more than 250 million Americans by the end of 2010.



The exclusive iPhone carrier in the U.S. plans to cover most of America with its network upgrade, which will double speeds on the company's existing 3G network, AT&T Operations CEO John Stankey disclosed at a Reuters event. According to Engadget, the upgrade could realistically offer most users download speeds between 7.2Mbps and 14.4Mbps.



Currently, the theoretical maximum speed for AT&T's 3G network is 7.2Mbps, thanks to an upgrade that was initiated last year with the launch of the iPhone 3GS. High Speed Packet Access 7.2 rollout began in late 2009, with initial expansion to six major U.S. cities. The theoretical maximum bandwidth is only possible under ideal conditions, and does not mean that most users will attain those speeds on their mobile device.



Last year, AT&T said it planned to offer HSPA 7.2 speeds in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets by the end of 2010, but this week's announcement -- while not offering any specifics on which cities will receive the upgrade -- suggests that AT&T is ahead of schedule in deploying the high-speed 3G network. The iPhone 3GS is a HSPA 7.2-compatible phone.



Of course, HSPA+ is just a step on the transition to LTE, or Long Term Evolution, a next-generation 4G data network that AT&T plans to begin deploying in 2011. In February, AT&T revealed that it had partnered with Alcatel-Lucent and Ericsson in preparation for next year's commercial deployment of the high-speed 4G network, which will require the installation of new equipment.



The coming transition to LTE networks, of which AT&T competitor Verizon will also be a part, is expected to cost U.S. carriers an estimated $1.78 billion each in the first year alone. AT&T's 2010 network expansions, which include HSPA+ rollout and preparation for LTE, will be a part of between $18 billion and $19 billion in capital expenditures for the company this year.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 89
    smiles77smiles77 Posts: 668member
    Bring it on. The network has definitely been faster where you get it, it's just that Delaware's state population of 800,000 is less than most major cities. Signal is great, but only when you can get it.
  • Reply 2 of 89
    kiweekiwee Posts: 102member
    So we can expect the next iPhone to support this then..

    Our networks are running it already so I'm just waiting for compatible hardware.
  • Reply 3 of 89
    bartfatbartfat Posts: 433member
    When the hell is 14.4 Mbps coming to landline broadband, let alone wireless broadband? Actually, come to think of it, 7.2 Mbps is faster than my cable connection at home. Something is seriously wrong in the ISP business...
  • Reply 4 of 89
    ktappektappe Posts: 808member
    I get plenty of AT&T signal....just rarely get throughput in spite of how many bars I have. I can't count how many times a day I have to tap OK to "Unable to reach server" on my iPhone. Can AT&T please fix 3G before they start spending all this $ on upgrading to the next great thing?
  • Reply 5 of 89
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bartfat View Post


    When the hell is 14.4 Mbps coming to landline broadband, let alone wireless broadband? Actually, come to think of it, 7.2 Mbps is faster than my cable connection at home. Something is seriously wrong in the ISP business...



    Its due to the Telcos buying out or burying the local/regional ISPs and seeing as their bread and butter is mostly in Wireless they drive that first and the ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+/VDSL/VDSL2/FTTH/FTTN, etc., last.
  • Reply 6 of 89
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,369member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwee View Post


    So we can expect the next iPhone to support this then..

    Our networks are running it already so I'm just waiting for compatible hardware.



    Let's put it this way if the new iPhone doesn't support 14Mbps then why bother?



    Dave
  • Reply 7 of 89
    @wizard69:



    STOP SCREAMING!

    The iPhone version works great on my iPhone.

    Let's just calm down.

    OK?
  • Reply 8 of 89
    walshbjwalshbj Posts: 864member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JoeDyndale View Post


    @wizard69:



    STOP SCREAMING!

    The iPhone version works great on my iPhone.

    Let's just calm down.

    OK?



    iPhone formatted site doesn't work great on my iPhone.



    I live in Charlotte - one of the first 6 cities slated to get the network upgrade last year. I notice little speed difference, though they have filled in a notable gap in a highly populated area I often travel to.



    Every little bit helps, but I wouldn't hold my breath expecting service anywhere near the theoretical max.
  • Reply 9 of 89
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    This is great and all, and this speed increase also means that some other issues will likely be resolved, but AT&T already bests everyone in the US in terms of speed. What they need to is market their pushing of the UMTS Operating Band V (850MHz), more 3G in more places, and evidence and promises of more reliability. AT&T needs to learn a little about marketing from Apple and Verizon.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bartfat View Post


    When the hell is 14.4 Mbps coming to landline broadband, let alone wireless broadband? Actually, come to think of it, 7.2 Mbps is faster than my cable connection at home. Something is seriously wrong in the ISP business...



    I know people with broadband cable that is faster than the theoretical speeds of 802.11g (54Mbps). It's at the point where consumer router processing abilities are the bottleneck. I hope Apple updates the AirPort Extreme Base Station to deal with this growing issue.
  • Reply 10 of 89
    walshbjwalshbj Posts: 864member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post




    ...I know people with broadband cable that is faster than the theoretical speeds of 802.11g (54Mbps). It's at the point where consumer router processing abilities are the bottleneck. I hope Apple updates the AirPort Extreme Base Station to deal with this growing issue.







    Good info on that in this book:

    http://www.takecontrolbooks.com/airport-n
  • Reply 11 of 89
    beltsbearbeltsbear Posts: 314member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JoeDyndale View Post


    @wizard69:



    STOP SCREAMING!

    The iPhone version works great on my iPhone.

    Let's just calm down.

    OK?



    Actually it really sucks on the Iphone. The screen is small already, why would I want to reduce the screen size further with TWO useless banners.
  • Reply 12 of 89
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BeltsBear View Post


    Actually it really sucks on the Iphone. The screen is small already, why would I want to reduce the screen size further with TWO useless banners.



    Then vote in the Feedback section. Wizard69 is really just breaking forum rules and annoying forum posters with his huge sig. Link is in my signature.
  • Reply 13 of 89
    walshbjwalshbj Posts: 864member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Then vote in the Feedback section. Wizard69 is really just breaking forum rules and annoying forum posters with his huge sig. Link is in my signature.



    True that, but it WAS his giant sig that got the poll started. And the poll pretty much says it all. So what's up AI??
  • Reply 14 of 89
    Is this the same AT&T that said, IN NOVEMBER 2008, that we would have tethering "soon"?



    Seriously, they're stalling for time. Data speeds in downtown Sacramento took a huge dump about two months ago. I don't know what they're doing, but they don't seem to understand how to run a wireless data network. Maybe they should go back to just selling voice service.



    Oh wait, that's right, my iPhone doesn't work as a phone either.



    P.S. Grrrrrrr.
  • Reply 15 of 89
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    250 million by the end of this year? Great I'll be able to use it in my flying car that runs on oxygen and emits oxygen as waste.



    What a joke man, this is at least 5 years away outside some testbed mid sized cities on the east coast.
  • Reply 16 of 89
    satcomersatcomer Posts: 130member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by daverobeson View Post


    Is this the same AT&T that said, IN NOVEMBER 2008, that we would have tethering "soon"?



    I have been saying for years don't trust tech coming soon hype. Only believe what you can see and is selling. I seen to much vaporware in my life I have become a skeptic in my old age of telecom and tech industries press releases.
  • Reply 17 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JoeDyndale View Post


    @wizard69:



    STOP SCREAMING!

    The iPhone version works great on my iPhone.

    Let's just calm down.

    OK?





    Ok, this is funny. I actually agree with wizard69 and dislike the mobile site but this is a great post.
  • Reply 18 of 89
    bartfatbartfat Posts: 433member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I know people with broadband cable that is faster than the theoretical speeds of 802.11g (54Mbps). It's at the point where consumer router processing abilities are the bottleneck. I hope Apple updates the AirPort Extreme Base Station to deal with this growing issue.



    It supports up to 802.11n for wireless, which goes up to 108 Mbps. So I don't see anyone having over 100 Mbps internet in the US Even universities like UCI, which is the one I go to, only have 15 Mbps allocated to wireless users.
  • Reply 19 of 89
    14,4 Mbits that still lag behind most HSPA+ networks around the world at 21Mbits.
  • Reply 20 of 89
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bartfat View Post


    It supports up to 802.11n for wireless, which goes up to 108 Mbps. So I don't see anyone having over 100 Mbps internet in the US Even universities like UCI, which is the one I go to, only have 15 Mbps allocated to wireless users.



    I know. My comment used 802.11g as a comparison, though I know a Fin with speeds over 100Mbps.



    Regardless, what is a theoretical speed is NOT a statement of what the HW can handle. Try getting several people on 802.11n for their notebooks, 802.11g for their phones on the dual channel, using the 1000BASE-T all trying to send copious amounts of data over the internet and local network and you have issues. Commercial routers simply aren't powerful enough to deal with certain consumer user's needs.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by einsteinbqat View Post


    14,4 Mbits that still lag behind most HSPA+ networks around the world at 21Mbits.



    Who makes radios for mobiles that can handle that speed? I've only heard of it for USB broadband cards and used more for marketing between telcos than anything else.
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