Microsoft reveals Office for Mac 2011 will be 32-bit only

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Set for release this fall, Microsoft's forthcoming Office for Mac 2011 will only be available as a 32-bit product because it hasn't completely transitioned to Cocoa for Mac OS X.



Microsoft's Mac OS X development team, MacBU, updated its official website this week to note that its members are at WWDC 2010 this week, taking part in Apple's developer sessions. The team revealed that their focus has been to increase compatibility between the Windows and Mac versions of Office, which means a 64-bit option on the Mac won't happen this year.



"Our work to increase compatibility means we haven?t completed the transition of moving the entire user interface over to Cocoa yet," Jake Hoelter, product unit manager with MacBU wrote. "And because Apple's frameworks require us to complete the move to Cocoa before we can build a 64-bit version, Office 2011 will be 32-bit only."



Elements of the newest Office for Mac, including the ribbon user interface, are built on Cocoa, the development layer of Mac OS X. And the all-new version of Outlook has been built from the ground up with Cocoa for the Mac.



Hoelter said that Office for Mac 2011 will still look and feel "great," Cocoa or not. He said the biggest advantage in having a 64-bit application is the larger memory capacity.



"Most users with typical or even larger-than-average document content will not notice a difference in performance," he said. "Where 64-bit can make a difference for people working with huge amounts of data, such as those creating very large Excel files with data in millions of cells, or PowerPoint presentations with thousands of high resolution images."







He also noted that the Windows Office Engineering team has recommended that most people buying Office for Windows stick with the 32-bit version, even though it will also be available in 64-bit. The team said the 32-bit version in Windows offers the best compatibility.



Hoelter said the MacBU team supports Cocoa because it makes it easier for them to give applications the look and feel that Mac users want. In the future, he said, the team plans to go further with Cocoa.



"Meanwhile," he said, "I think customers are going to be really happy with the improvements in compatibility, collaboration, and user experience we're bringing in Office 2011."



The new version of Office for Mac promises greater feature parity with its Windows version, including improved support for Exchange and reincorporated support for Visual Basic for Applications. It also has a similar look to Office 2010 for Windows, adding the ribbon interface found in previous Windows versions.



Office for Mac 2011 will also add co-authoring tools to allow multiple users the ability to work on files from Word, PowerPoint or Excel from different locations. Microsoft Web Apps can also be accessed, allowing users to share Office documents from any machine with an Internet connection. And Microsoft has said the new ribbon interface gives "the best of both worlds" by using the classic Mac menu and Standard Toolbar.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 114
    minderbinderminderbinder Posts: 1,703member
    Fail.



    Give me a yell in a couple years when you finally get your act together, maybe I'll consider it then.
  • Reply 2 of 114
    cory bauercory bauer Posts: 1,286member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    ... it hasn't completely transitioned to Cocoa for Mac OS X.



    Take your time, Microsoft. I mean it's only been about eight years since Apple started strongly suggesting all developers move their apps to Cocoa and xCode.



    Office is the most bloated, resource-eating, slow-as-hell collection of programs on the platform. Seriously, HD After Effects renders are less taxing on my Mac Pro than launching Microsoft Entourage.
  • Reply 3 of 114
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,148member
    Do most users need 64 bit office? No.

    Does it run in 64-bit snow leopard? Yes.

    Will this stop most users from updating? Not likely.



    Is this good for iWork? Yes.



    Is it a fail? Not really.
  • Reply 4 of 114
    ktappektappe Posts: 771member
    Why is MS's MacBU at WWDC? There are no Mac tracks at WWDC. It's all iOS.
  • Reply 5 of 114
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,616member
    Why do the Windows and Mac versions look so different? It seems completely pointless to have one application that runs of two different platforms and not have identical visual functionality layout. They may have different colors and such but it seems ridiculous to have different layouts and different naming conventions.
  • Reply 6 of 114
    chronsterchronster Posts: 1,894member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post


    Take your time, Microsoft. I mean it's only been about eight years since Apple started strongly suggesting all developers move their apps to Cocoa and xCode.



    Office is the most bloated, resource-eating, slow-as-hell collection of programs on the platform. Seriously, HD After Effects renders are less taxing on my Mac Pro than launching Microsoft Entourage.



    Then don't use it. It's that simple lol

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post


    Do most users need 64 bit office? No.

    Does it run in 64-bit snow leopard? Yes.

    Will this stop most users from updating? Not likely.



    Is this good for iWork? Yes.



    Is it a fail? Not really.



    Thanks for posting the common sense early on this one. The thread will still be filled with funny comments though
  • Reply 7 of 114
    jpellinojpellino Posts: 618member
    Good lord - does someone at MS beat their interfaces with an ugly stick?



    "Microsoft reveals Office for Mac 2011 will be 32-bit only"



    In a related story, Ford Festivas will have cast, not forged cranks.
  • Reply 8 of 114
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,582member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by paxman View Post


    Why do the Windows and Mac versions look so different? It seems completely pointless to have one application that runs of two different platforms and not have identical visual functionality layout. They may have different colors and such but it seems ridiculous to have different layouts and different naming conventions.



    Because if they were identical, the Mac Office menu bar would just contain a single menu. for example, "Word", which would make for a pretty confusing user experience on Mac OS. The ribbon is confusing enough as it is for Windows users.
  • Reply 9 of 114
    user008user008 Posts: 2member
    Please MS enhance the Cyrillic support in Office 2011. It is impossible to create cyrillic custom dictionary in language different from Russian.



    In Office 2008 there is not Cyrillic support at all!
  • Reply 10 of 114
    dimmokdimmok Posts: 359member
    that means the Law of the Donkey is invoked here.....
  • Reply 11 of 114
    macinthe408macinthe408 Posts: 1,050member
    I mean, seriously, who needs a 64-bit version of Office now?



    This is the computer world's equivalent of Keeping Up with the Joneses. We don't need something, but gosh darn do we want it!



    For example, can you provide a plug-in that provides access to Twitter and Facebook that allows us to embed a live News Feed in an Excel worksheet's cell?



    What? Can't do it? What a crappy application.
  • Reply 12 of 114
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post


    Fail. Give me a yell in a couple years when you finally get your act together, maybe I'll consider it then.



    Yea... Well we should give em some credit that they made the COCOA transition while COCOA was still an active Apple technology.... Ummm it IS isn't it? I mean it's WWDC day 3 I'm sure SOMEONE from Apple MUST have mentioned it by now right? Right??
  • Reply 13 of 114
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ktappe View Post


    Why is MS's MacBU at WWDC? There are no Mac tracks at WWDC. It's all iOS.





    If I'm not mistaken, Steve Jobs stated at the beginning of his keynote video that there was, indeed, discussion and info available about the entire Mac environment ... all week long.
  • Reply 14 of 114
    dualiedualie Posts: 333member
    Nobody is even going to know the difference, or care. There is nothing in Office that can really benefit from 64bit anyway.
  • Reply 15 of 114
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    I am ready for this release. We are moving to Exchange 2010 and will benefit greatly from the new version of Office:Mac. I don't like iWork, there is no WordPerfect for Mac and OpenOffice doesn't work for my needs.
  • Reply 16 of 114
    technotechno Posts: 707member
    Apple is doomed!
  • Reply 17 of 114
    lfmorrisonlfmorrison Posts: 697member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post


    Fail.



    Give me a yell in a couple years when you finally get your act together, maybe I'll consider it then.



    I suppose iTunes is also a "fail" because it it still 32 bit and uses Carbon, and you won't consider using it until Apple finally gets its act together.
  • Reply 18 of 114
    Why is iTunes still 32 bit, 8 years after Carbon has been pronounced dead? For the same reason.
  • Reply 19 of 114
    Yeah, the whole 320bit thing doesnt bother me as much as the UI. Regardless of aesthetics... or that "Mac feel" apps tend to have over a typical Windows OS Experience... from my personal experience, i make the assumption that more and more people are bouncing back and forth between OS's now aday... and the UI needs to be identical. This has been a problem with MS Office for mac for the last years. I feel as though I have to learn two completely different sets of apps depending if I want to work on Office for mac or Office for PC.



    Do you think they are just trying to differentiate it for branding purposes? I'm really perplexed.
  • Reply 20 of 114
    commun5commun5 Posts: 36member
    The only thing that most people who still use Office will really care about in the 2011 Office for Mac will be how well the Mac Business Unit reimplements Visual Basic and whether the new Outlook will be functional. Everything else is window(s)-dressing.
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