Apple issues review guidelines for Mac App Store

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  • Reply 61 of 175
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post


    Just because something is true for your particular product doesn't mean that it's true in general. Do you think most copies of Microsoft Office, for example, are purchased in electronic form or via a boxed version?



    Clearly, some niche products aren't going to do well in a brick & mortar store (or even via mail-order) because they required educated customers to purchase them (that is, people have to know why they'd want to purchase "WebKnocker II" before they'd slap the money down for it). OTOH, if you had a product with genuine mass appeal *and* you advertised it properly, it would probably sell quite well in a B&M store. Of course, the advertising alone would cost you a lot more than 30%.



    The real question I'd ask you is: how do you think your product would sell via the app store and would it be worth 30% to you? How many people visit your web site each day? Would your product sales benefit by having millions of people browsing the app store each day? (granted, only a small percent might see your product, but is that number greater than those who would otherwise find your website?)



    Indeed some products are going to do better in stores than others, but I can't remember the last time I bought any software in a store, and none of my staff can either, and I can't think of anyone I know who has bought any software in physical form for the last several years. Even the big ones like the Adobe suite, I downloaded and purchased online.



    Will our products be in the App store? Yes, you bet.



    Do I think that 30% is a good deal? Yes.



    Do I think the model needs to be tweaked for desktop software vs mobile software? Yes, by having try before you buy, so that it's possible for customers to experience the full power of the software and be prepared to pay the higher price for high quality desktop software.
  • Reply 62 of 175
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post


    Wow. If this happens once a month to you, you might want to consider purchasing an automatic password generator program and use that :-) You obviously don't know how to choose good passwords :-)



    I use 1Password (brilliant software), and have a very strong password. Nobody has ever managed to access my account. All it takes is someone entering my apple id and any random password three times, and I'm locked out and have to go in and unlock it.
  • Reply 63 of 175
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post


    I saw no mention of in-app purchases. I wonder if they'll provide support for that?



    It's implied in the app store rules: "Apps that unlock or enable additional features or functionality with mechanisms other than the App Store will be rejected, except in cases where the application hosts plug-ins or extensions."
  • Reply 64 of 175
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    That may be true for companies that distribute their own software, but the majority of software is still sold in brick & mortar stores, where the discount is closer to 50%.



    Even when you use online distribution other than Apple's I doubt if the cut is much less than 30%.



    I don't know what sort of software you're buying, but I can't remember the last time I went into a store and actually walked out with a box of software... Maybe when I bought Leopard. Most of the software I buy is directly from the application developers over the internet. These guys are all going to suffer.
  • Reply 65 of 175
    rp2011rp2011 Posts: 159member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    All those things "will" benefit the user. Thank you apple.



    I completely agree. Honestly, as a consumer I can tell you right off that I would feel a heck of a lot safer downloading something from the Apple app store than anywhere else. I may even think twice about downloading from elsewhere. With the amount of malicious software and customer apprehensions, it will be in developers best interests to get the seal of approval.

    It will benefit everyone. If another competing app store offered this type attention to consumer protection I would shop there too. The last thing I want is the Android app type mess on my desktop. It's fine for geeks that have too much time on their hands, but not for the general consumer.
  • Reply 66 of 175
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,131member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rp2011 View Post


    I completely agree. Honestly, as a consumer I can tell you right off that I would feel a heck of a lot safer downloading something from the Apple app store than anywhere else. I may even think twice about downloading from elsewhere. With the amount of malicious software and customer apprehensions, it will be in developers best interests to get the seal of approval.

    It will benefit everyone. If another competing app store offered this type attention to consumer protection I would shop there too. The last thing I want is the Android app type mess on my desktop. It's fine for geeks that have too much time on their hands, but not for the general consumer.



    This.



    You guys are all computer savvy but put yourself into the shoes of the typical consumer who doesn't know who Panic or Rogue Amoeba is. How safe would you feel about buying software from a Dot Com named Rogue Amoeba?



    The Mac App Store is going to deliver "instant" credibility with consumer just as the App Store has.
  • Reply 67 of 175
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Akac View Post


    Most distribution mechanisms where the developer doens't have his own merchant account (most don't) take anywhere from 10-50%.



    Name three.
  • Reply 68 of 175
    The App Store is a step to be able to use your apps on any Mac you log into.



    To do that the license needs to be for multiple macs (but probably PER USER), the apps need to be self contained, they need to install very simply and in a standard way so the Mac can do it without user intervention and without restarting the Mac.



    It's all linked to an online model (Apple's data centre) that allows people to login anywhere and use their apps with their data.



    btw: Apple won't force people to use the App Store, but anyone who wants to move seamlessly between any Macs will be trying to make sure their apps are all from the App Store.
  • Reply 69 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mlaurencg4 View Post


    http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/



    This site is frequently ignored for days or weeks at a time, whereas MacUpdate provides daily releases of information regarding new additions to the plethora of software developed or improved upon for Apple Macs.



    Doesn't provide much confidence in the reliability of today's proposed AppStore.



    Quite the contrary. In the app store model the developers keep their apps updated, not Apple.



    If anything you have demonstrated why the App store will be far more successful than the downloads site could ever be.
  • Reply 70 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mario View Post


    I think it's really time to move on to more open and free platforms



    Hopefully ones that can assist you with reading comprehension as well
  • Reply 71 of 175
    this right here says it all

    "Apps that download other standalone apps will be rejected. Apps that install kexts (kernel extensions) will be rejected. Apps that require license keys or implement their own copy protection will be rejected. Apps that present a license screen at launch will be rejected. Apps may not use update mechanisms outside of the App Store.



    there is no way anyone like adobe or MS are gonna conform to that. that alone rules out 90% of the apps out there. Even if the app store tags an application simiar to how it does itunes music, it'll never stop people from sharing it illlegally if serialisation is removed..granted people pirate serials too, but not so easily. this would be asking developers to just throw their hands in air and let even the most amature of piraters to share apps like they are MP3s.



    the app store is pretty much a front to put your apps on map if you don't already got your own thing going. anyone that already has a strong brand would be giving up substancial profits and control of their product and simply won't do it with these rules.
  • Reply 72 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    That leaves out a lot of big Mac developers right there. I'm not sure how Omigraffle and Pixelmator (who have both said they were looking forward to the store AFAIK), are going to work around that.



    Probably by (eagerly) dropping their own schemes and using the standard tools provided by Apple.



    The fact that people like you see this as a negative just shows how little of the realities of software development you understand.
  • Reply 73 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Haggar View Post


    Even when Apple itself does not follow these rules for their own Mac applications?



    Sure - those applications just won't be distributed in the app store
  • Reply 74 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    Within a year's time, I'd bet money that Microsoft will "suddenly" decide to open their own Window's App Store.



    The Zune app store for Windows - coming to a photo copier near you
  • Reply 75 of 175
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,131member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    Probably by (eagerly) dropping their own schemes and using the standard tools provided by Apple.



    The fact that people like you see this as a negative just shows how little of the realities of software development you understand.



    How many developers love proclaiming "Inbox zero!" in their tweets. I think people are underestimating how much "support" costs in time and attention. The Mac App Store isn't going to eliminate support costs but it should reduce the "I lost my serial number" requests greatly.



    I think about how easy this Mac App Store could be for the newbie developer that has no street cred. Getting your app on the store means it's at least functioning like you've said it would and you only pay if the app sells. You wouldn't even have to run a huge website ..simply point to the store and let Apple pay your bandwidth costs with that 30%.



    It's not going to be a big deal for the larger companies but what they need to beware of is the smaller indie playing David to their Goliath.
  • Reply 76 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by strobe View Post


    Few developers are going to put up with this (let alone pay 30% for the privilege), and those that do will mostly be iPhone ports.



    Saving this to come back a year from now. Will also give you plenty of time to decide how you like your crow served.
  • Reply 77 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by strobe View Post


    30% is a shitty deal and dead in the water for anyone other than possibly iPhone developers who don't have the initiative to figure it out.



    Caw, caw...
  • Reply 78 of 175
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rhyde View Post


    Just don't give me any Mac Fart apps :-)



    AFAIK, nobody can "give you" what you "refuse to take".
  • Reply 79 of 175
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post


    Perhaps you can elaborate on the problems *you've* had with the iTunes store?



    That it's successful despite his irrational hate for it?
  • Reply 80 of 175
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Haggar View Post


    Even when Apple itself does not follow these rules for their own Mac applications?



    They own the store, they can do what they want. ..... build your own store, then you can do what you want.
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