After clean install: connecting iPhone to iTunes, will I lose iPhone contents?

Posted:
in Genius Bar edited January 2014
Just did a clean install of Snow Leopard on my MacBook. When I connect my iPhone to the new iTunes, what do I have to do to make certain I don't wipe my iPhone?



Don't want to lose contacts, SMS messages, settings, etc.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    go to iTunes Preferences (before connecting the iPhone.)

    In the "Devices" tab, make sure that the box is checked to PREVENT automatic Syncing.



    Now, DON'T SYNC !



    You'll want to restore your address book, iTunes folder, calendars, etc ON YOUR MAC prior to syncing the iPhone. I've not ever had to start from a clean slate, but I believe that iTunes doesn't give you the option of restoring that stuff FROM THE PHONE.
  • Reply 2 of 24
    Better yet, don't do the so-called clean install unless you are recovering from some sort of catastrophe.
  • Reply 3 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post


    go to iTunes Preferences (before connecting the iPhone.)

    In the "Devices" tab, make sure that the box is checked to PREVENT automatic Syncing.



    Now, DON'T SYNC !



    You'll want to restore your address book, iTunes folder, calendars, etc ON YOUR MAC prior to syncing the iPhone. I've not ever had to start from a clean slate, but I believe that iTunes doesn't give you the option of restoring that stuff FROM THE PHONE.



    I'm with you on the first half, especially setting Preferences not to automatically sync.



    As for the second, I think I found my answer (took a while) at Apple support. Regarding syncing:



    The first time you sync your device, you are asked if you want to merge data, replace data on the device, or replace the data on your computer. When you choose to merge information, any differences between the data will be mingled together. If you choose to replace information, information from either the computer or device will overwrite the information on the other. These options can not be undone. After that, anytime you connect your device to your computer, iTunes opens and syncs with your device according to the settings in iTunes.



    So you can move iPhone content to iTunes, but only at the inaugural link.
  • Reply 4 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Better yet, don't do the so-called clean install unless you are recovering from some sort of catastrophe.



    I clean install about once a year -- keeps the system fast and lean.
  • Reply 5 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    I clean install about once a year -- keeps the system fast and lean.



    ... and Jesus is coming back, too.

  • Reply 6 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post


    ... and Jesus is coming back, too.





    The ultimate clean install?
  • Reply 7 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post


    ... and Jesus is coming back, too.





    What am I missing?
  • Reply 8 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    What am I missing?



    The joke? Just a wild guess, mind you.
  • Reply 9 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    The joke? Just a wild guess, mind you.



    Do enlighten me.
  • Reply 10 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    Do enlighten me.



    Your belief that a "clean install" makes your system "fast and lean," is just that -- a belief (i.e., not supported by fact). Unless you're regularly adding all kinds of weird software to your system, then it makes no difference at all. But the nuke and pave approach does take a lot of time, which apparently leads you to believe that it's worthwhile.
  • Reply 11 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Your belief that a "clean install" makes your system "fast and lean," is just that -- a belief (i.e., not supported by fact). Unless you're regularly adding all kinds of weird software to your system, then it makes no difference at all. But the nuke and pave approach does take a lot of time, which apparently leads you to believe that it's worthwhile.



    I see. No chance of picking up any ugly little odds and ends from the vast reaches of the Interweb that might get properly yanked by a clean install?
  • Reply 12 of 24
    Yes, it was intended as a joke. (and also a not-so-subtle dig at people who believe in either scenario.)



    I have yet to be presented with any evidence that a seemingly "normal" OSX installation would run "better" if installed from scratch.

    Now, it is certainly POSSIBLE that there might be something lurking in there that slows things down... depends on what type of sites you frequent perhaps. If your system is obviously running slow, and Click-2-Flash doesn't fix things, then yes, a clean install might be in order. But if things are running relatively smoothly, there's no reason (that I've heard) to think a "clean" install would make things any better.

    It does, in fact, introduce a whole host of headaches though. Your iTunes/iPhone/iPod syncing dilemma being just one of them.
  • Reply 13 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    I see. No chance of picking up any ugly little odds and ends from the vast reaches of the Interweb that might get properly yanked by a clean install?



    Actually, no. No chance at all.
  • Reply 14 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Actually, no. No chance at all.



    Really? No chance at all that our OS's can pick up bugaboos? Any reason your post directly contradicts KingOfSomewhereHot's?
  • Reply 15 of 24
    I have never had a bugaboo in my system, and I wouldn't know where to find one if I wanted it.



    Seriously, if you're going to nuke and pave once a year (and God forbid, recommend this practice to anyone else), you'd bloody well better be able to justify it on some other reasonable basis than something maybe could have possibly in some murky and undocumented and unknown fashion, gone wrong, and nuke and pave is the only solution.
  • Reply 16 of 24
    Ok... never say "Never", (or "at all".)



    But really, at the moment, from a statistical standpoint at least, you can honestly say there is "No chance at all."



    It's just part of the way UNIX is designed. It is certainly possible, if you're good at that sort of thing, to design some nefarious virus or malicious code... but to get it to actually spread throughout the installed user base is nearly impossible.



    On the other hand... with the inefficient way most things are coded these days, just about ANY program you run could be accused of slowing down your OS unnecessarily. (Yes, I learned to code in a time when system resources were valuable and your code was graded on efficiency... Likely before many of you were even born. )
  • Reply 17 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    I have never had a bugaboo in my system, and I wouldn't know where to find one if I wanted it.



    Seriously, if you're going to nuke and pave once a year (and God forbid, recommend this practice to anyone else), you'd bloody well better be able to justify it on some other reasonable basis than something maybe could have possibly in some murky and undocumented and unknown fashion, gone wrong, and nuke and pave is the only solution.



    Your opening statement is logically inconsistent; you assert you've had no computer issues but also admit that if you did you don't know what they'd look like, where they'd be or how to respond to them.



    Basically, you've just admitted you're in no knowledgeable position to offer advice on the matter, but here you are doing so, and pointedly at that. What's more, in the absence of hard facts, your advice works just as well in reverse, which is no advice at all.



    You clearly have very strong negative opinions about nuking and paving, but give no definite reason why. You claim it's pointless to erase and install as a preventative against unknowns, but acknowledge the unknowns are just as unknown to you, so how can you know, much less be so adamant about it?



    "God forbids" and "bloody wells" are a wee bit too emotional, not to mention condescending -- which has been your tone in this thread -- but minus facts or reference points beyond yourself, it's all just noise.
  • Reply 18 of 24
    c-bearc-bear Posts: 111member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post


    Ok... never say "Never", (or "at all".)



    But really, at the moment, from a statistical standpoint at least, you can honestly say there is "No chance at all."



    It's just part of the way UNIX is designed. It is certainly possible, if you're good at that sort of thing, to design some nefarious virus or malicious code... but to get it to actually spread throughout the installed user base is nearly impossible.



    On the other hand... with the inefficient way most things are coded these days, just about ANY program you run could be accused of slowing down your OS unnecessarily. (Yes, I learned to code in a time when system resources were valuable and your code was graded on efficiency... Likely before many of you were even born. )



    Although your Jesus comment was apropos of nothing and needlessly insulting to anyone reading who happens to hold that belief -- this post at least has some measure of knowledge and reason behind it.



    I'll also note that you actually offered help for the original question posed here, which is appreciated.



    Clean installs are indeed extreme but I think mitigate reasonable unknowns.



    Why is it so difficult to get malicious code to spread through an installed user base?
  • Reply 19 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    Your opening statement is logically inconsistent; you assert you've had no computer issues but also admit that if you did you don't know what they'd look like, where they'd be or how to respond to them.



    Basically, you've just admitted you're in no knowledgeable position to offer advice on the matter, but here you are doing so, and pointedly at that. What's more, in the absence of hard facts, your advice works just as well in reverse, which is no advice at all.



    You clearly have very strong negative opinions about nuking and paving, but give no definite reason why. You claim it's pointless to erase and install as a preventative against unknowns, but acknowledge the unknowns are just as unknown to you, so how can you know, much less be so adamant about it?



    "God forbids" and "bloody wells" are a wee bit too emotional, not to mention condescending -- which has been your tone in this thread -- but minus facts or reference points beyond yourself, it's all just noise.



    What a ludicrous response. No, I never "asserted" that I never had any computer issues. In fact I never referenced any frequency or type of computer issues at all, so your implication is without a shred of justification. What I'm saying is quite clear. One more time for the cheap seats: If you are taking the drastic action of starting your Mac from scratch on an annual basis, then you'd better have a good reason. Since apparently the best reason you are able to articulate is the vague possibility of "bugaboos" and "malicious code" that you cannot seem to name, then I think it's obvious that you don't actually have a good reason. You are wasting your time, and risking data loss, to no good cause.



    I'm perfectly aware that this is a religious issue for some. Nuking and paving makes them feel better, and no logic need be applied. Well, if it feels good, do it -- all I can ask is that you don't recommend this procedure to anyone else. It's the classic solution in search of a problem.
  • Reply 20 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    Although your Jesus comment was apropos of nothing and needlessly insulting to anyone reading who happens to hold that belief --



    A lot of jokes are like that... I can't help it if people have absurd beliefs.







    Quote:
    Originally Posted by C-Bear View Post


    Why is it so difficult to get malicious code to spread through an installed user base?



    Well... The number one reason is an economic one (always follow the money! ). The installed user base for OSX (and UNIX variants in general) is so small, statistically, that it's not worth the time to write code that targets it. Windows targeted malfeasance is ever-so-much more likely to show results.



    Two... it's just the way Unix is designed... It's much harder to get code onto a system without the users knowledge. No, it's not impossible, but it is harder.

    As for "Clean Install" ... you could always just go to your start-up items and delete the things you don't want running in the background. If it doesn't start-up, then it's not running and it's not using system resources. The OS really is designed to run for years and years without problems... Mine goes for months at a time without even restarting. Processes are much easier to delete than they are with Windows... I'm not saying there's anything wrong with Windows if you like it, the 2 OS's are just designed with different priorities.
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